8 Little Known Facts About the Temple

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The human body is an amazing thing. For each one of us, it’s the most intimate object we know. And yet most of us don’t know enough about it: its features, functions, quirks, and mysteries. Our series The Body explores human anatomy, part by part. Think of it as a mini digital encyclopedia with a dose of wow.

 

At the edges of the eyebrows, you’ll find the temple, the flat, tender side of the head where you often press your fingers to relieve a headache. In movies, one karate chop to this area can allegedly kill a person, but is this really true? What lies beneath that smooth surface of skin that’s so delicate? To learn more, Mental Floss spoke to Dr. Abbas Anwar, an otolaryngologist and head and neck surgeon at Southern California Head and Neck Medical Group in Santa Monica.

1. THE TEMPLE IS A JUNCTURE.

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It's technically where four skull bones—the frontal, parietal, temporal, and sphenoid—meet in the skull. This vulnerable juncture is called the pterion, which means "wing" in Greek but sounds like a kind of dinosaur.

2. IT REVEALS A DISTANT LINK TO REPTILES.

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The temporal bone itself is made up of five smaller parts, which fuse together before birth. One of these pieces, called the tympanic part, may be evolutionarily linked to the angular bone in the lower jaws of reptiles.

3. IT'S THE THINNEST PART OF THE SKULL …

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While these skull bones are "relatively strong," though thin, Anwar tells Mental Floss, the point at which they meet is the weakest point because there's no solid bone beneath them. "As such, this area is at risk with direct horizontal blows."

4. … WHICH IS WHY MAORI WARRIORS CRAFTED A SPECIAL WEAPON TO CRUSH IT.

maori stone club
Australian Museum, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

When Maori warriors of the first nations tribes of New Zealand and Australia went into battle, one weapon they took with them was the patu onewa, a flat, heavy club carved from stones such as basalt, and sometimes jade, for the specific purpose of delivering a fatal, crushing blow to the temple.

5. THE TEMPLE COVERS A MAJOR ARTERY.

historical medical illustration of head and scalp arteries
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Running below these bones is a large artery known as the middle meningeal artery. It supplies blood to the outer covering of the brain, the meninges. "If hit hard enough, one of the four bones at this point can fracture inward and lacerate the middle meningeal artery," Anwar explains. This can cause an epidural hematoma, essentially "a collection of blood that builds up around the brain and compresses it."

Severe bleeding can cause "catastrophic consequences" if not recognized and treated promptly, including brain herniation (bulging brain tissue), hemiparesis (weakness of one side of the body), and death.

6. IS YOUR TEMPLE A SACRED SPACE?

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Etymologists don't entirely agree on the meaning of the word temple, which has multiple origins. It may derive from the Latin word for time, tempus, according to a Dartmouth Medical School anatomy course: "The connection may be that with the passage of time, grey hairs appear here early on. Or it may relate to the pulsations of the underlying superficial temporal artery, marking the time we have left here."

It could also possibly hail from the Greek word temenos, meaning "place cut off," which would explain the idea of a temple of worship as well as that juncture of bones at the side of the head. 

In Old English, tempel meant "any place regarded as occupied by divine presence," which might be code for the brain as the residence of consciousness or God.

More likely it's related to the Greek pterion, which as you'll recall means "wing." In Greek mythology, Hermes, messenger of the gods, wore a helmet with wings, which were positioned over the temples.  

7. IT'S PRONE TO SKIN CANCER THAT'S HARD TO REMOVE.

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Surgeon Gabriel Weston writes in The Guardian that skin cancers frequently turn up in this area from over exposure to the Sun, which makes for a challenging surgical procedure. "It is often not possible simply to sew up the hole in the skin after cutting a cancer out, since doing so can easily distort the contour of the eye," he writes.

To get around the problem, Weston uses a special technique called a Wolfe graft. After cutting away the cancerous lesion, "I measure out a circle of equal size in the skin above the collar-bone (where the skin is similar) and remove it." He grafts this skin patch to the patient's temple "with tiny silk sutures." 

8. BRAIN FREEZE ISN'T IN YOUR BRAIN.

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Sometimes when you eat or drink something cold too quickly, you get brain freeze, which can feel like someone has taken knives to your temples. But the pain isn't actually in your brain at all, as brains have no pain receptors. While researchers haven't been able to determine a cause of what's technically called sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia, or sometimes HICS ("headache attributed to ingestion or inhalation of a cold stimulus"), they theorize that the painful freeze you experience is likely caused by a quick cooling of the blood in the back of your throat at the juncture your internal carotid and anterior cerebral arteries, which can cause spasms or constrictions of the arterial branches.

10 Facts About Your Tonsils

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iStock/Neustockimages

Most of us only become aware of our tonsils if they become swollen or infected. But these masses of lymphatic tissue in the mouth and throat are important immunological gatekeepers at the start of the airways and digestive tract, grabbing pathogens and warding off diseases before they reach the rest of your body. Here are some essential answers about these often-overlooked tissues—like what to do when your tonsils are swollen, and whether you should get your tonsils removed.

1. People actually have four kinds of tonsils.

The term tonsils usually refers to your palatine tonsils, the ones that can be seen at the back of your throat. But tonsillar tissue also includes the lingual tonsil (located in the base of the tongue), tubal tonsils, and the adenoid tonsil (often just called adenoids). "Collectively, these are referred to as Waldeyer's ring," says Raja Seethala, the director of head and neck pathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a member of the College of American Pathologists Cancer Committee.

2. Tonsils are one of the body's first responders to pathogens.

The tonsils are a key barrier to inhaled or ingested pathogens that can cause infection or other harm, Seethala tells Mental Floss. "These pathogens bind to specialized immune cells in the lining—epithelium—to elicit an immune response in the lymphoid T and B cells of the tonsil," he says. Essentially, they help jumpstart your immune response.

3. Adenoid tonsils can obstruct breathing and cause facial deformities.

If the adenoid tonsils are swollen, they can block breathing and clog up your sinus drainage, which can cause sinus and ear infections. If adenoids are too big, it forces a person to breathe through their mouth. In children, frequent mouth breathing has the potential to cause facial deformities by stressing developing facial bones. "If the tonsils are too large and cause airway obstruction, snoring, or obstructive sleep apnea, then removal is important," says Donald Levine, an ear, nose, and throat specialist in Nyack, New York. Fortunately, the adenoids tend to get smaller naturally in adulthood.

4. As many of us know, sometimes tonsils are removed.

Even though your tonsils are part of your immune system, Levine tells Mental Floss, "when they become obstructive or chronically infected, then they need to be removed." The rest of your immune system steps in to handle further attacks by pathogens. Another reason to remove tonsils besides size, Levine says, is "chronic tonsillitis due to the failure of the immune system to remove residual bacteria from the tonsils, despite multiple antibiotic therapies."

5. Tonsillectomies have been performed for thousands of years ...

Tonsil removal is believed to have been a phenomenon for three millennia. The procedure is found in ancient Ayurvedic texts, says Seethala, "making it one of the older documented surgical procedures." But though the scientific understanding of the surgery has changed dramatically since then, "the benefits versus harm of tonsillectomy have been continually debated over the centuries," he says.

6. ... and they were probably quite painful.

The first known reported case of tonsillectomy surgery, according to a 2006 paper in Otorhinolaryngology, is by Cornélio Celsus, a Roman "encylopaediest" and dabbler in medicine, who authored a medical encyclopedia titled Of Medicine in the 1st century BCE. Thanks to his work, we can surmise that a tonsillectomy probably was an agonizing procedure for the patient: "Celsus applied a mixture of vinegar and milk in the surgical specimen to hemostasis [stanch bleeding] and also described his difficulty doing that due to lack of proper anesthesia."

7. Tonsil removal was performed for unlikely reasons.

The same paper reveals that among some of the more outlandish reasons for removing tonsils were conditions like "night enuresis (bed-wetting), convulsions, laryngeal stridor, hoarseness, chronic bronchitis, and asthma."

8. An early treatment for swollen tonsils included frog fat.

As early practitioners struggled to perfect techniques for removing tonsils effectively, another early physician, Aetius de Amida, recommended "ointment, oils, and corrosive formulas with frog fat to treat infections."

9. Modern tonsillectomy is much more sophisticated.

A common technique today for removing the tonsils, according to Levine, is a far cry from the painful early attempts. Under brief general anesthesia, Levine uses a process called coblation. "[It's] a kind of cold cautery, so there is almost no bleeding, less post operative pain, and quicker healing. You can return to normal activities 10 days later," Levine says.

10. Sexually-transmitted HPV can cause tonsil cancer.

The incidence of tonsillar cancers is increasing, according to Seethala. "Unlike other head and neck cancers, which are commonly associated with smoking and alcohol, tonsillar cancers are driven by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)," he says. "HPV-related tonsillar cancer can be considered sexually transmitted."

26 Amazing Facts About the Human Body

Mental Floss via YouTube
Mental Floss via YouTube

At some point in your life, you've probably wondered: What is belly button lint, anyway? The answer, according to Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy, is that it's "fibers that rub off of clothing over time." And hairy people are more prone to getting it for a very specific (and kind of gross-sounding) reason. A group of scientists who formed the Belly Button Biodiversity Project in 2011 have also discovered that there's a whole lot of bacteria going on in there.

In this week's all-new edition of The List Show, Erin is sharing 26 amazing facts about the human body, from your philtrum (the dent under your nose) to your feet. You can watch the full episode below.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here.

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