7 Throwback Photos of 1980s NYC Subway Graffiti

In May 1989, after a 15-year-long campaign of slowly eradicating New York City’s subway graffiti train-by-train, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority officially declared the city’s subways graffiti-free. There’s still subway graffiti in New York City today, but now it's confined to rail yards far away from the stations and tunnels. By the time the trains make it back onto the tracks, they’ve been cleaned of any markings.

There was a time, though, when graffiti artists had near-free rein to use the city’s subway trains as their canvases, as much as the transportation agency tried to stop them. A new book of photography, From the Platform 2: More NYC Subway Graffiti, 1983–1989, is an ode to that period.

A photo taken at night shows a subway train tagged "Cav."

Its authors, Paul and Kenny Cavalieri, are two brothers from the Bronx who began taking photos of subway trains in 1983, during the heyday of New York City's graffiti art era. They themselves were also graffiti artists who went by the names Cav and Key, respectively. (Above is an example of Cav's work from 1988, and below is an example of Key's.) Their book is a visual tribute to their youth, New York's graffiti culture, and their fellow artists.

For anyone who rides the New York City subway today, the images paint a whole different picture of the system. Let yourself be transported back to the '80s in some of these photos: 

A subway car bears tags by "Damps" and "Key."
Some of Kenny (Key) Cavalieri's work, circa 1987.

Graffiti on a subway car reads "Dero" in blue letters.

Blue letters tagged on the exterior of a subway car read “Comet.”

Pink and blue lettering reads “Bio” on the outside of a subway car.

A subway car reads “Pove” in green letters.

The book includes short commentaries and essays from other artists of the period remembering their experiences painting trains. It's a follow-up to Paul Cavalieri’s original 2011 collection From the Platform: Subway Graffiti, 1983-1989. He’s also the author of Under the Bridge: The East 238th Street Graffiti Hall Of Fame, a history of four decades of graffiti in the Bronx.

From the Platform 2 is $30 on Amazon.

[h/t The Guardian]

All images courtesy Paul and Kenny Cavalieri // Schiffer Publishing

15 of the World's Most Popular Beaches as Seen From Above

Biletskiy_Evgeniy/iStock via Getty Images
Biletskiy_Evgeniy/iStock via Getty Images

Planning your next great beach vacation? See what the world's most popular spots for sun and sand look like from the sky.

1. South Beach // Miami Beach, Florida

Shadow of airplane arriving in Miami
Lady-Photo/iStock via Getty Images

Miami Beach, Florida’s South Beach is a major entertainment area, attracting tourists from all over the world to enjoy the city's unique nightlife, shopping, and restaurants.

2. Bondi Beach // Sydney, Australia

Aerial view of Bondi Beach in Australia
weareadventurers/iStock via Getty Images

With its breathtaking views and vibrant beach culture, it's no wonder that Bondi Beach is one of Australia's most iconic destinations.

3. Tulum, Mexico

Aerial view of a beach in Tulum, Mexico
Creative-Family/iStock via Getty Images

Tulum, Mexico's crystalline beaches are just one part of what makes this seaside town the third most visited site in Mexico.

4. Surin Beach // Phuket, Thailand

Aerial view of Surin Beach in Phucket, Thailand
Travel Wild/iStock via Getty Images

Acting more like a coastal village than a beach resort, Thailand’s Surin Seach is also known as "Millionaire's Row" because it's lined with luxury resorts that are filled with A-list celebrities.

5. Waikiki Beach // Honolulu, Hawaii

Aerial image of tropical Waikiki Beach Honolulu Hawaii
felixmizioznikov/iStock via Getty Images

Located in the Hawaiian capital of Honolulu, Waikiki Beach—which is 2 miles long—accounts for about 42 percent of the state’s annual tourist industry revenue.

6. Deauville Beach // Normandy, France

Aerial view of Deauville beach in Normany, France
RossHelen/iStock via Getty Images

Deauville Beach in Normandy, France is often referred to as the "queen of the Norman beaches." In addition to being surrounded by a ton of history, it's one of the most prestigious seaside resorts in all of France.

7. Navagio Beach // Zakynthos, Greece

Aerial view of Navagio Beach in Zakynthos, Greece
FelipeDutra/iStock via Getty Images

Located in the Ioanian Islands of Greece, Navagio Beach, a.k.a. Shipwreck Beach, is a secluded cove and is often cited as the most beautiful beach in Greece (which is pretty high praise when you consider the competition).

8. Trunk Bay // St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

Aerial view of Trunk Bay in St John in United States Virgin Islands
SeanPavonePhoto/iStock via Getty Images

St. John’s most famous beach, Trunk Bay, has a snorkeling trail for its visitors that includes information about coral formations and sea life.

9. Maya Bay // Phi Phi Islands, Thailand

Aerial view of Maya Bay in Phi Phi Island in Thailand
Travel Wild/iStock via Getty Images

Danny Boyle's 2000 film The Beach, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, may have been a box office dud—but it made a star out of its filming location in Thailand. So much so that the beach became a sort of victim of its own success; because of the amount of tourists it attracted (it was regularly called "the most famous beach in Thailand"), it closed to tourists in 2018. Earlier this year, officials announced a tentative reopening in the summer of 2021.

10. Anse Source d’Argent // Seychelles

Aerial view of Anse Source D'argent in Seychelles
mariiakamenska/iStock via Getty Images

Located in the Seychelles, an archipelago off the cost of East Africa, Anse Source d'Argent—with its pink sands and rows of beaches—is a great place to both relax and explore.

11. Isola Bella // Taormina, Sicily

Aerial view of Isola Bella at Taormina in Sicily
j-wildman/iStock via Getty Images

Isola Bella, one of Sicily’s most beautiful beaches, is located in Taormina, a small hilltop town that is also home to Teatro Antico di Taormina, an ancient theater that's still in use today.

12. Newport Beach, California

Aerial view of Newport Beach, California
TraceRouda/iStock via Getty Images

Whether it’s hiking or water activities, Newport Beach has plenty to do for both sunbathers and adventure-seekers.

13. Railay Beach // Thailand

Aerial view of Railay Beach in Thailand
JaySi/iStock via Getty Images

Getting to Thailand’s Railay Beach is part of the adventure: It's a small peninsula that is only accessible by boat.

14. Surfer’s Paradise // Queensland, Australia

Aerial view of Surfers Paradise in Queensland, Australia
zstockphotos/iStock via Getty Images

This seaside resort in Eastern Australia offers great views and majestic waves, making it truly live up to its name.

15. Kamari Beach // Santorini, Greece

Aerial view of Kamari Beach in Greece
SStajic/iStock via Getty Images

Kamari Beach resides on one of Greece’s most popular islands, Santorini, and is notable for its unique black sand.

Amazing Time-Lapse Shows Leaves Dramatically Changing Color During Fall

RCKeller/iStock via Getty Images Plus
RCKeller/iStock via Getty Images Plus

During autumn, the leaves of many of our deciduous trees change color before falling off and dying. Sad, right? It depends on how you look at it.

Owen Reiser—a very patient mathematics and biology student at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville—spent more than a month filming the color-changing process to create an ambitious, two-minute time-lapse video featuring close-ups of leaves transforming from yellow and green to red and brown.

“I was taking a field biology class and we were learning about deciduous trees,” Reiser told Smithsonian. “I’ve been getting into wildlife photography and time-lapse for a while, and I couldn’t find a time-lapse of leaves changing color, so I just went for it.”

It took Reiser six weeks—and many sleepless nights—to compile the footage. He snapped more than 6000 close-up photos of leaves, including images from 10 different Midwestern deciduous trees, such as sassafras and sugar maple. He took a photo of each leaf once every 30 to 60 seconds for three days using a camera, a LED light, and a battery that allowed his camera to run constantly. “It’s [basically] a cardboard box and a bunch of duct tape, but it gets the job done,” he said.

You can see the green and yellow leaves quickly fill with reds and browns; new colors dramatically take over, and pigments break down. It looks like “dye spreading through fabric,” according to Smithsonian.

But what occurs when the leaves alter color isn’t so simple. “People argue that the red color is [also] an unmasking from the breakdown of chlorophyll, and that’s simply wrong,” David Lee, professor emeritus in biological sciences at Florida International University, told Smithsonian. “The red color is actually made when the chlorophyll is beginning to break down—there’s a synthesis of those pigments, so it’s quite a different thing.”

Either way, after watching the video, you'll never look at fall foliage the same way again.

[h/t Smithsonian]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER