Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons
Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Sergeant Stubby: The Drool Sergeant of World War I

Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons
Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Dogs have gone to war for thousands of years, but during World War I, one pooch rose above his peers. When the 102nd Infantry’s 26th Yankee Division was training at Yale, a stray dog befriended the men. Nicknamed Stubby, the mutt learned to salute by throwing a paw up to his eyebrow. When the unit shipped out to France, it was only natural that the soldiers smuggled Stubby along.

Trouble arose when commanding officers discovered the furry stowaway. Before they could send Stubby home, however, he saluted his superiors. Impressed, they let him stay on as the unit’s official mascot.

Stubby did more than boost morale; he quickly proved to be an ace soldier. After surviving a gas attack, Stubby became sensitive to chemical agents, and whenever he sensed danger, he would run down the line alerting his human comrades. He also entered the no-man’s land between trenches to help paramedics find wounded soldiers. And once, when a German spy infiltrated an Allied foxhole, Stubby attacked the intruder until American troops could capture him. This last triumph prompted the 102nd Infantry’s commander to put in for Stubby’s promotion to sergeant, and he became the first dog ever to receive a rank in the American military.

By the time the war ended, Stubby had served in 17 battles over 18 months. He’d been injured twice and received multiple medals for bravery, including a Purple Heart. The American media fell in love with the scrappy dog. Sgt. Stubby got to meet presidents Wilson, Harding, and Coolidge; he became Georgetown University’s mascot; and he's now the subject of a kids' movie, Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero. Not bad for a stray!

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Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images
How a Hairdresser Found a Way to Fight Oil Spills With Hair Clippings
Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images
Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images

The Exxon Valdez oil tanker made global news in 1989 when it dumped millions of gallons of crude oil into the waters off Alaska's coast. As experts were figuring out the best ways to handle the ecological disaster, a hairdresser from Alabama named Phil McCroy was tinkering with ideas of his own. His solution, a stocking stuffed with hair clippings, was an early version of a clean-up method that's used at real oil spill sites today, according to Vox.

Hair booms are sock-like tubes stuffed with recycled hair, fur, and wool clippings. Hair naturally soaks up oil; most of the time it's sebum, an oil secreted from our sebaceous glands, but it will attract crude oil as well. When hair booms are dragged through waters slicked with oil, they sop up all of that pollution in a way that's gentle on the environment.

The same properties that make hair a great clean-up tool at spills are also what make animals vulnerable. Marine life that depends on clean fur to stay warm can die if their coats are stained with oil that's hard to wash off. Footage of an otter covered in oil was actually what inspired Phil McCroy to come up with his hair-based invention.

Check out the full story from Vox in the video below.

[h/t Vox]

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Bristly
A New Chew Toy Will Help Your Dog Brush Its Own Teeth
Bristly
Bristly

Few pet owners are willing to sit down and brush their pet's teeth on a regular basis. (Most of us can barely convince ourselves to floss our own teeth, after all.) Even fewer pets are willing to sit calmly and let it happen. But pet dental care matters: I’ve personally spent more than $1000 in the last few years dealing with the fact that my cat’s teeth are rotting out of her head.

For dog owners struggling to brush poor Fido’s teeth, there’s a slightly better option. Bristly, a product currently being funded on Kickstarter, is a chew toy that acts as a toothbrush. The rubber stick, which can be slathered with doggie toothpaste, is outfitted with bristles that brush your dog’s teeth as it plays.

A French bulldog chews on a Bristly toy.
Bristly

Designed so your dog can use it without you lifting a finger, it’s shaped like a little pogo stick, with a flattened base that allows dogs to stabilize it with their paws as they hack at the bristled stick with their teeth. The bristles are coated in a meat flavoring to encourage dogs to chew.

An estimated 80 percent of dogs over the age of 3 have some kind of dental disease, so the chances that your dog could use some extra dental attention is very high. In addition to staving off expensive vet bills, brushing your dog's teeth can improve their smelly breath.

Bristly comes in three sizes as well as in a heavy-duty version made for dogs who are prone to ripping through anything they can get their jaws around. A Bristly stick costs $29 and is scheduled to start shipping in October. Get it here.

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