15 Delicious Ways to Utilize Nutella

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In 1964, the Beatles kicked off the British Invasion by making their first American performance on The Ed Sullivan Show, Roald Dahl published "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," and a tiny jar of hazelnut-flavored chocolate spread changed the dessert world forever.

Nutella, a sweetened hazelnut cocoa spread from Ferrero, debuted on April 20, 1964. Since then, it's evolved into a global phenomenon with a passionate fan base (as recently illustrated by the "Nutella riots" in France). The brand even has its very own holiday—World Nutella Day is celebrated February 5.

While many opt for the spoon-to-mouth Nutella experience (it's the most efficient method, after all), fans have uncovered dozens of unique ways to use the spread in the kitchen and beyond. In celebration of World Nutella Day, here are 15 of our favorites.

1. NUTELLA PIZZA

A Nutella pizza.
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It's not delivery, it's your new favorite dessert pizza. To make, just spread Nutella on top of baked pizza dough and add any toppings of your choice—strawberries, bananas, marshmallows, nuts, various drizzles. Bake for 5-10 minutes and top with powdered sugar.

2. NUTELLA COFFEE SWEETENER

Nutetlla toast with a cup of coffee.
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If the idea of caffeinated Nutella helps get you out of bed in the morning, this homemade creamer is easy to whip up in advance. Or, simply replace your regular sugar or sweetener with a small teaspoon of Nutella to stir into a fresh cup of coffee.

3. NUTELLA-COVERED BACON

Nutella-covered bacon.
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You've heard of chocolate-covered bacon, but adding the nutty kick of Nutella takes this treat up a notch. This salty-yet-sweet concoction is great for breakfast. Or dessert. Or appetizers.

4. NUTELLA ART

Nutella art on a plate.
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Can you find Nutella in the arts and crafts aisle? Not yet, but a quick look through the #NutellaArt hashtag on Instagram has us thinking someday that'll change. Fans are creating beautiful works of Nutella art—from the Mona Lisa to Pikachu—and we can't decide what's more impressive: the intricacy of the artwork or the self-control to leave Nutella on the plate.

5. NUTELLA SOAP

Wooden spoon full of Nutella.
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Nothing screams "clean" like soap made out of a sugary hazelnut spread, right? Apparently true fans don't care, and they've come up with their own recipes for "Nutella soap." But, spoiler alert—it's really just soap in a Nutella jar. Either way, we'll take it!

6. NUTELLA QUESADILLAS

Nutella and banana quesadillas.
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Since stuffed crepes are difficult to make at home, Nutella quesadillas are the next best thing. With a little Nutella, a tortilla, and your favorite toppings (sprinkles, bananas, whipped cream, the works) you can make a less authentic but just as delicious portable dessert.

7. NUTELLA S'MORES

Pile of s'mores.
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Step up your s'mores game with an alternative to chocolate bars—Nutella! The recipe is about as simple as you can get—spread Nutella on a graham cracker, toast a marshmallow, combine—but the unexpected flavor will win over any campfire crew.

8. NUTELLA HOT CHOCOLATE

Mug of hot chocolate.
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Give your hot chocolate a hazelnut makeover by swapping out those old powder packs. Instead, warm 3 tablespoons of Nutella and 1 1/3 cup of milk in a saucepan (or in the microwave). And if you want to spike it? A shot of peppermint schnapps or Bailey's will spice it right up.

9. NUTELLA CANDLES

While we don't condone setting your Nutella on fire, many fans have crafted ways to clean out the jars and make their own DIY, Nutella-branded candles. Don't trust yourself with DIY? You can buy ready-made Nutella candles on Etsy.

10. NUTELLA SNOW GLOBES

A snowglobe.
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If you want to show your brand loyalty while decorating for some seasonal cheer, Nutella snow globes allow you to create any wintry, glittery, chocolatey scene you'd like. This DIY guide can walk you through it.

11. NUTELLA JAR ICE CREAM DISH

Bowl of ice cream with hazelnuts.
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It can be so hard to get those last bits of Nutella out of the jar. But once you're down to the last serving, scoop some ice cream directly into the jar. The "topping" may be on the bottom of the jar, but by the time you've finished your dessert, the last remnants of Nutella will be cleared out.

12. NUTELLA RAVIOLI

Nutella ravioli.
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Your Italian nonna may cringe, but Nutella fans have gotten uber creative, whipping up their own "Nutella Ravioli." You can either stuff wonton wrappers with the hazelnut spread and top them with mint leaves and powdered sugar, or use crescent roll dough for the pastry pockets.

13. NUTELLA MARTINI

Nutella martini.
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A basic chocolate martini will no longer do once you've tried adding Nutella. This recipe calls for double the chocolate and hazelnut flavors, courtesy of Frangelico and Godiva Chocolate Liqueur in addition to a tablespoon of Nutella.

14. BOOZY NUTELLA MILKSHAKES

Nutella milkshake.
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Few things beat a boozy milkshake, especially when Nutella is the core ingredient. This Nutella milkshake recipe calls for vodka, milk, vanilla ice cream, whipped cream and a healthy scoop of Nutella.

15. NUTELLA PIGGY BANK

Need a cute place to store your laundry quarters or stash those pennies that you never spend? Wash out an empty Nutella jar, use an X-Acto knife to slice a small rectangular slot in the lid, and enjoy saving up for another jar of your favorite hazelnut spread.

Watch a 'Pasta Granny' Prepare This Rare 'Duchess's Little Snails' Dish

Courtesy of Vicky Bennison
Courtesy of Vicky Bennison

By some estimates, Italy has over 350 different kinds of pasta—and that’s only counting the different shapes. You’ll find twisted strozzapreti (literally “priest stranglers”), shoe-shaped ravioli, “swaddled baby” ravioli, and ear-shaped orecchiette.

While some of these variations can be found all throughout Italy, others are prepared only in certain regions, mostly by elderly women who may not have taught these family recipes to the next generation. One of the rarest types of pasta is su filindeu (which translates to “God’s wool”), and only a few people in the world know how to make it.

Vicky Bennison, the creator of the Pasta Grannies website and YouTube channel, wants to change that. By documenting these women (and sometimes men) doing what they do best, she hopes to preserve these centuries-old recipes.

Take, for instance, Anna Faggi, whose signature lumachelle della duchessa (literally “the duchess’s little snails") can only be found in the Pesaro Urbino region of central Italy.

According to the Encyclopedia of Pasta by Oretta Zanini De Vita, legend has it that lumachelle was invented inside the royal court of the Duke of Urbino, a walled city in Italy’s Marche region. The duke’s kitchen servants carried the recipe beyond the palace, where it became popular among nuns in the region.

The dough contains cinnamon and nutmeg, and the preparation is rather time-consuming, making it a dish that’s only prepared for weddings and other special occasions.

After preparing and slicing the dough, Faggi wraps the strips around a bulrush reed to create tiny tubes. Next, she rolls the tubes over a comb to create ridges in the pasta. It’s served in chicken stock, and while it’s traditionally topped with chicken stomach, you can do what Faggi does and add Parmigiano cheese instead.

See how it’s made in the video below:

A Low-Carb Diet Could Shorten Your Lifespan

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The Atkins, Paleo, and Keto diets may have different gimmicks, but they all share a common message: Carbs are bad and meat is good. Yet a new analysis reported by New Scientist suggests that anyone who buys into this belief may later come to regret it. According to the paper, published in The Lancet Public Health, people who eat a moderate amount of carbs actually live longer than those who avoid them.

For their study, researchers analyzed data previously collected from 15,400 participants in the U.S. They found that people who received about 50 to 55 percent of their calories from carbohydrates had the longest lifespans, roughly four years longer than those who got 30 percent or less of their energy from carbs.

This doesn't necessarily mean that the key to a healthy diet is to stock your pantry with pasta and croissants. The study also showed that people who got up to 70 percent or more of their energy from carbs died one year earlier on average than subjects in the 50 to 55 percent group. A closer examination at the eating of habits of people who ate fewer carbs revealed another layer to the phenomenon: When people avoided carbohydrates in favor of meat, their chances of early death rose, but the opposite was true for people who replaced carb-heavy foods with plant-based fats and proteins, such as nuts, beans, and vegetables.

These numbers point to something dietitians have long been aware of: Eating a diet that's based around animal products isn't ideal. Getting more of your protein from plant-based sources, on the other hand, can lower your blood pressure and reduce your risks of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and certain cancers. Nonetheless, fad diets that forbid people from eating carbs while letting them eat as much steak as they want are still popular because they're an easy way to lose weight in a short amount of time. But as the research shows, the short-term results are rarely worth the long-term effects on your health.

[h/t New Scientist]

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