25 Amazing Facts for National Beer Day

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iStock

Today is National Beer Day! If you're out with friends and run out of things to talk about, here are some beer facts to share.

1. After he won the Nobel Prize, Niels Bohr was given a perpetual supply of beer piped into his house.

2. The Code of Hammurabi decreed that bartenders who watered down beer would be executed.

3. At the Wife Carrying World Championships, first prize is the wife's weight in beer.

4. A cloud near the constellation Aquila contains enough ethyl alcohol to fill 400 trillion trillion pints of beer.

5. Coined in the early 1900s, the word "alcoholiday" means leisure time spent drinking.

6. The builders of the Great Pyramid of Giza were paid with a daily ration of beer.

7. During WWII, a bear named Wojtek joined the Polish army. He transported ammunition and sometimes drank beer.

8. Fried beer won Most Creative Fried Food at the 2010 Texas State Fair.

9. The top five states for beer consumption per capita: 1. North Dakota, 2. New Hampshire, 3. Montana, 4. South Dakota, 5. Wisconsin.

10. Germany is home to a beer pipeline. Taps in Veltsin-Arena are connected by a 5km tube of beer.

11. Thomas Jefferson wrote parts of the Declaration of Independence in a Philadelphia tavern.

12. Cenosillicaphobia is the fear of an empty glass.

13. At the end of Prohibition, FDR said, "What America needs now is a drink."

14. Winston Churchill called the concept of Prohibition "an affront to the whole history of mankind."

15. George Washington insisted his continental army be permitted a quart of beer as part of their daily rations.

16. Oktoberfest originally started as a festival celebrating the 1810 marriage of Crown Prince Ludwig.

17. At spas in Europe, you can literally bathe in beer as a physical and mental therapeutic treatment.

18. In the 1990s, the Beer Lovers Party ran candidates in Belarus and Russia.

19. J.K. Rowling invented Quidditch in a pub.

20. Beer helped Joseph Priestley discover oxygen. He noticed gases rising from the big vats of beer at a brewery and asked to do some experiments.

21. A Buddhist temple in the Thai countryside was built with over 1 million recycled beer bottles.

22. The moon has a crater named Beer.

23. Beer soup was a common breakfast in medieval Europe.

24. At the start of Bavarian Beer Week in Germany, an open-air beer fountain dispenses free beer to the public.

25. In the 1980s, a beer-drinking goat was elected mayor of Lajitas, Texas.

Spoiler: You’re Probably Storing Your Wine Wrong

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iStock

If you love wine, you should invest in a wine rack. No, not because of the space-saving potential or how good it will look in your kitchen. It will make your wine last longer and taste better.

According to Lifehacker, the proper way to store a bottle of wine is on its side, at least if the wine has a cork. That's because if you store a bottle upright, the cork can dry out. When a bottle is stored sideways, there's always liquid coming into contact with the cork. This keeps the cork expanded, ensuring the bottle's tight seal. If the cork dries out, it can shrink, letting air get into the wine, causing it to age prematurely and taste less than delicious.

Note that this only applies to bottles with real corks. You can store your screw-top wine bottles any way you'd like, since you don’t have to worry about the seal.

The sideways method does have its critics—notably, a major cork producer in Portugal recently questioned the storage technique's efficacy, saying that the humidity within the bottle will keep the cork moist no matter what. However, other wine experts maintain that sideways is the way to go.

Wine aficionados have a few other tips when it comes to storage. Essentially, you want to mimic the environment of a wine cellar as much as possible. You want to keep your wine in a cool place away from light. The environment should be humid, helping to keep the cork sealed tight. Vibrations can also affect wines, so you want to keep your bottles from clanking around.

Once you've opened a bottle of wine, you want to make sure it stays fresh. If you're not going to drink it all in one sitting, make sure to replace the cork. While it's much easier to stick the clean side back in the bottle first, make sure to replace the cork as it was, meaning the stain side down. The top of the cork has been exposed to the elements for the bottle's entire lifespan, so it may be tainted, and you don't want that coming into contact with your wine. (Or just invest in a wine stopper.) And, because wine likes cool environments, make sure to stick it in the fridge once it's opened—yes, even if it's a red.

[h/t Lifehacker]

Carlsberg Is Ditching Plastic Rings by Gluing Its Six-Packs Together

Carlsberg
Carlsberg

The humble six-pack is an environmental nightmare. Those familiar plastic rings are notorious for the danger they pose to marine wildlife, as animals often get ensnared in them, starving to death when they get their mouths caught. While the common solution is to ask consumers to cut up the rings before placing them in the trash, that’s only a stop-gap measure. Now, Carlsberg has come up with a new plan to rid the world of plastic rings altogether. According to The Telegraph, the Copenhagen-based beer producer has come up with a glued six-pack design that keeps beers together without adding extra plastic.

The Snap Pack design keeps beer cans together with dots of glue. The bonds are strong enough to withstand the jostling of transport, but not so strong that you can’t break them apart. (Unlike the thicker plastic holders used by craft beer companies, which can be a nightmare to use.) The design took three years to perfect.

Previously, a Florida-based brewery called Saltwater created an edible, compostable set of six-pack rings designed to make drinking beer a bit more dolphin-safe, but this eliminates the rings entirely. Considering that Carlsberg is one of the world’s top beer producers, the environmental benefit is pretty dramatic. The company estimates that the glued packs will reduce the amount of plastic used in traditional multi-packs of beer by more than 75 percent, saving around 1322 tons of plastic every year.

The Snap Packs will make their debut in the U.K. in September 2018, before being rolled out to the rest of Europe and the world.

[h/t The Telegraph]

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