A Chemical in Bed Bug Poop Might Be Making You Feel Sick

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Bed bugs can give you nasty bites and a lifetime of nightmares, but scientists have long wondered if the creepy parasites can pass diseases to their hosts. For years, the general consensus was no: Unlike ticks, mosquitos, and other insects that are known to feast on human blood, bed bugs aren't packing any harmful pathogens in their bites. Yet according to a new study, spotted by Gizmodo, the bugs don't need to nibble on us to make us sick. Histamines in their poop might be aggravating our immune systems.

For their study, recently published in the journal PLOS One, scientists at North Carolina State University tested the dust in a bed bug-infested apartment complex. They found that samples from some infested homes had histamine levels 20 times higher than those without bed bugs. This was still the case three months after the buildings had been treated by exterminators.

Histamine is a chemical compound produced by our bodies. In small amounts, it works as a vital part of our immune system. It's activated in the presence of allergens, irritants, and pathogens. Say a puff of dust goes up your nose: Histamine is what prompts your body to sneeze it out. It's also the culprit behind the watery eyes, runny nose, and itchy skin you might experience during an allergy attack (which is why you might take an antihistamine to calm these symptoms).

But we're not alone in our ability to produce histamine. Recent research has shown that the chemical is present in bed bug feces. When the insects poop, they spray histamines into the same air that homeowners breathe. A few whiffs of the stuff is likely nothing to worry about, but scientists are concerned about the effects environmental histamine can have on people over an extended period of time. The chemical compound can cause allergic reactions on its own and possibly make us more vulnerable to existing allergens. The implications are especially serious for people with asthma.

"Dermal, nasal, or respiratory responses (e.g. bronchial reactivity) to histamine in clinical tests suggest that exposure to histamine in the environment would constitute a significant health risk, although information on environmental exposure is limited," the study authors write.

For now, scientists can do nothing but speculate on what these results might mean for public health. Humans are prepared to treat only histamine that's produced by our own bodies, and dealing with the effects on histamine spread by bed bugs is uncharted territory for doctors and scientists. How exactly bed bugs obtain the chemicals in the first place is also unclear, but researchers suspect that it's a combination of the blood they suck from us and histamine they make on their own as a type of pheromone, indicating to other bed bugs that a place is safe to invade.

Following this study, the North Carolina State scientists plan to conduct more intensive research on the impact histamine produced by bed bugs is having on the people who live with it. While the best way to eradicate histamine in bed bug poop is still a mystery, there are plenty of ways to deal with the bugs themselves if you suspect you have an infestation.

[h/t Gizmodo]

A Low-Carb Diet Could Shorten Your Lifespan

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The Atkins, Paleo, and Keto diets may have different gimmicks, but they all share a common message: Carbs are bad and meat is good. Yet a new analysis reported by New Scientist suggests that anyone who buys into this belief may later come to regret it. According to the paper, published in The Lancet Public Health, people who eat a moderate amount of carbs actually live longer than those who avoid them.

For their study, researchers analyzed data previously collected from 15,400 participants in the U.S. They found that people who received about 50 to 55 percent of their calories from carbohydrates had the longest lifespans, roughly four years longer than those who got 30 percent or less of their energy from carbs.

This doesn't necessarily mean that the key to a healthy diet is to stock your pantry with pasta and croissants. The study also showed that people who got up to 70 percent or more of their energy from carbs died one year earlier on average than subjects in the 50 to 55 percent group. A closer examination at the eating of habits of people who ate fewer carbs revealed another layer to the phenomenon: When people avoided carbohydrates in favor of meat, their chances of early death rose, but the opposite was true for people who replaced carb-heavy foods with plant-based fats and proteins, such as nuts, beans, and vegetables.

These numbers point to something dietitians have long been aware of: Eating a diet that's based around animal products isn't ideal. Getting more of your protein from plant-based sources, on the other hand, can lower your blood pressure and reduce your risks of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and certain cancers. Nonetheless, fad diets that forbid people from eating carbs while letting them eat as much steak as they want are still popular because they're an easy way to lose weight in a short amount of time. But as the research shows, the short-term results are rarely worth the long-term effects on your health.

[h/t New Scientist]

Ocean Explorer Jean-Michel Cousteau's Tips for Dealing With Seasickness

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Jean-Michel Cousteau—son of the iconic documentary filmmaker and conservationist Jacques Cousteau—claims to have never experienced seasickness himself. The 80-year-old explorer attributes his luck to the amount of time he's spent on boats filming nature documentaries, exploring marine environments, and raising awareness about conservation issues. So what advice does he have when his shipmates start to look a little green around the gills? Thrillist recently reached out to him for an answer.

Cousteau has seen a fellow sailor succumb to the nausea-inducing rocking of a ship many times. When this happens, he says the best thing to do is avoid the bow, or the front of the ship, but resist the urge to hide out below deck—away from any views of the ocean. Motion sickness occurs when the information sensed by our inner ear doesn't match up with what we see in front of us: In the case of sea travel, this could mean you feel the floor of the boat shifting beneath you while the wall of the galley appears to stay still.

Rather than forcing yourself to forget where you are, Cousteau says the most effective approach is to embrace your enemy. Look out at the water and try to appreciate the sights. Staring intently at the horizon will also help re-balance what you're seeing with what you're sensing. Soon you won't be focusing on that queasy feeling in your stomach. “Suddenly, instead of not feeling well, they’re distracted by our profound connection to the oceans," Cousteau told Thrillist.

And if all else fails and your boat is nowhere near dry land, Cousteau suggests a very Cousteau-esque solution: Slip on your scuba gear and get in the water. Of course, that may not be an option depending on what type of voyage you're on. If that's the case, you may want to consider these more conventional motion sickness remedies.

[h/t Thrillist]

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