How Google Chrome’s New Built-In Ad Blocker Will Change Your Browsing Experience

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iStock

If you can’t stand web ads that auto-play sound and pop up in front of what you’re trying to read, you have two options: Install an ad blocker on your browser or avoid the internet all together. Starting Thursday, February 15, Google Chrome is offering another tool to help you avoid the most annoying ads on the web, Tech Crunch reports. Here’s what Google Chrome users should expect from the new feature.

Chrome’s ad filtering has been in development for about a year, but the details of how it will work were only recently made public. “While most advertising on the web is respectful of user experience, over the years we've increasingly heard from our users that some advertising can be particularly intrusive,” Google wrote in a blog post. “As we announced last June, Chrome will tackle this issue by removing ads from sites that do not follow the Better Ads Standards.

That means the new feature won’t block all ads from publishers or even block most of them. Instead, it will specifically target ads that violate the Better Ad Standards that the Coalition for Better Ads recommends based on consumer data. On desktop, this includes auto-play videos with sound, sticky banners that follow you as you scroll, pop-ups, and prestitial ads that make you wait for a countdown to access the site. Mobile Chrome users will be spared these same types of ads as well as flashing animations, ads that take up more than 30 percent of the screen, and ads the fill the whole screen as you scroll past them.

These criteria still leave room for plenty of ads to show up online—the total amount of media blocked by the feature won’t even amount to 1 percent of all ads. So if web browsers are looking for an even more ad-free experience, they should use Chrome’s ad filter as a supplement to one of the many third-party ad blockers out there.

And if accessing content without navigating a digital obstacle course first doesn’t sound appealing to you, don’t worry: On sites where ads are blocked, Google Chrome will show a notification that lets you disable the feature.

[h/t Tech Crunch]

Tesla Drivers Now Have Access to a Library of Fart Sounds in Their Car

Spencer Platt, Getty Images
Spencer Platt, Getty Images

Tesla’s latest software update includes more than just a few technical tweaks. It also turns the electric vehicles into on-demand fart machines, according to Inverse.

Tesla’s Emissions Testing Mode lets drivers choose different fart sounds from the car’s touchscreen, giving electric-car owners a good sense of Elon Musk’s sense of toilet humor. There’s “Short Shorts Ripper,” “Falcon Heavy,” Ludicrous Fart,” Neurastink,” “Boring Fart,” and “Not a Fart,” all of which are named after some Musky in-joke. (The last one is a play on the Boring Company’s Not a Flamethrower.) Should drivers find it impossible to choose between all the sound effects, the “I’m so random” will shuffle through them automatically.

Users can program the fart sounds to play when a turn signal is activated or when the driver touches the left-side steering scroll wheel. You can see/hear it in action in a Tesla Model S here.

Farting functionality isn’t the only whimsical edition to the software. At this point, Tesla's in-car software comes with a variety of Easter eggs for users to unlock, including games, special lighting effects, and more. In addition to all the flatulence, this update includes a Romance Mode that brings up video of a cozy, crackling fire on the central console and prompts the car to blast the heat and turn on some sensual tunes.

[h/t Inverse]

Warning: Don't Fall for the New Netflix Phishing Scam Going Around

iStock.com/wutwhanfoto
iStock.com/wutwhanfoto

In addition to catching up on Stranger Things and kicking ex-roommates off your account, you now have something else to worry about if you're a Netflix user. As WYFF 4 reports, there's a phishing scam circulating through email that targets subscribers to the streaming service.

The email is formatted to look like an official message from Netflix, with the company's logo at the top. It informs you that "your account is on hold," and that you need to update your payment information before service can resume.

But law officials are warning web users not to click the link in the email, or in any emails that come from unfamiliar sources. "Criminals want you to click the links, so that you voluntarily give your personal identifying information away. It is very successful," the Solon, Ohio police department shared in a Facebook post. "Don't click the links. The links could also be a way to install malware on your computer."

The phishing email contains a few clues that it's not legitimate: It lists an international phone number, uses the British spelling of centre, and opens with the unusual greeting "Hi Dear."

But even without these giveaways, you should always be wary of emails that ask for personal information, even if they appear to come from companies that you trust. According to Netflix, communications emails will always come from the address info@mailer.netflix.com. If you receive a message from this address (or an address that looks like it), and aren't sure if it's trustworthy, you can always go to Netflix and reach out to customer service about the problem directly.

[h/t WYFF 4]

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