At Long Last, Someone Bought Longaberger's Basket-Shaped Office

For more than 20 years, Newark, Ohio, has been home to what is likely the world's biggest picnic basket. Built in 1997, the former headquarters of The Longaberger Company is a seven-story architectural masterpiece made to look like the company’s signature woven picnic baskets. Unfortunately, not many other businesses want to work inside a picnic basket. The Longaberger Company has been trying to offload the office building since 2015, with few bites. Now, finally, someone has agreed to buy the building—towering handles and all.

At long last, someone bought the building in late 2017, according to Columbus Business First. Sadly, the oddly shaped building won't be going to a company that makes blankets or light snacks appropriate for eating on grassy lawns. The Louisville, Ohio-based developer Coon Restoration paid $1.2 million for the property, agreeing to pay the $800,000 in back taxes the Longaberger Company owes on it. The final price is a far cry from the $7.5 million it was once listed for, and even further away from the $32 million it took to build it in 1997 (that’s $49.4 million in 2018 dollars).

Coon Restoration owner Steve Coon has yet to reveal what he plans to do with the building, but he has said that he plans to renovate it, potentially to turn it into a mixed-use office building or a hotel. “I have a big vision in mind to bring it back to life and keep the Longaberger story alive,” Coon said in a statement regarding the sale. He has already hired Cleveland’s Sandvick Architects, designers who specialize in historic preservation, to work on the project. We can’t wait to see what they do with those handles.

[h/t Country Living]

Here's How Much it Would Cost to Build Hogwarts in Real Life

Warner Home Video
Warner Home Video

At some point, every Harry Potter fan has dreamed of going to Hogwarts. But a lack of magical ability isn't the only reason that the School of Witchcraft and Wizardry will have to remain in the realm of fantasy. Even recreating the physical structure would be nearly impossible in real life ... unless you're a billionaire looking to burn a lot of cash.

​BigRentz, an online marketplace for renting construction equipment, recently calculated the costs of building various fictional locations, such as Batman's Bat Cave, The Wall from Game of Thrones, and you guessed it—Hogwarts. And it turns out, magical castles are even more expensive than you might think.

According to the company's calculations, the castle itself would cost $169,740,000. Built in the style of Windsor Castle, Hogwarts stretches over 414,000 square feet. The Great Hall, which measures 5800 square feet, would alone cost a whopping $870,000.

Moving beyond the castle walls, the eight greenhouses would cost $175,000, and Hagrid's hut would come in at $400,000. Building the Quidditch pitch would cost another $1,031,980. And for the One-Eyed Witch Passage running between Hogwarts and Honeydukes? A full $2,490,000.

In total, BigRentz calculates that Hogwarts's construction bill would come to a whopping $174.5 million. And that's just construction costs. The cost of furnishing, supplying, and running the school—where tuition is free—would add significantly to that figure.

New LEGO Sets Let You Recreate the Iconic Skylines of San Francisco and Paris

In 2016, LEGO began releasing architecture-themed sets that let toy-loving designers recreate the world’s most famous skylines in their own homes, beginning with re-creations of New York, Venice, and Berlin. And now, the company is adding Paris and San Francisco to the mix, according to Archinect.

The new LEGO Architecture kit for Paris will feature the Eiffel Tower and Arc de Triomphe (both already available as stand-alone skyscraper kits) as well as the Louvre, the Tour Montparnasse, and other famous buildings. The LEGO San Francisco kit features the Golden Gate Bridge, the Transamerica Pyramid, Coit Tower, 555 California (formerly the Bank of America Center), Alcatraz Island, and the new Salesforce Tower, which recently became the city’s tallest building.

LEGO sets of the Paris and San Francisco skylines
LEGO

No doubt residents of both cities will have some gripes about which buildings were included and which were nixed from the kits. The Tour Montparnasse, in particular, was so deeply loathed upon its completion in the 1970s that the city of Paris promptly imposed a strict height restriction on buildings taller than 11 stories. Meanwhile, many San Francisco residents are still adjusting to the sight of the Salesforce Tower, which opened in 2018—it has been called “an atrocious spectacle,” its height described as “really offensive.”

You can check out all the kits from LEGO’s Architecture line here. Keep an eye out for the San Francisco and Paris versions starting early next year.

[h/t Architect]

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