15 Wonderful Words for Delightful Experiences

ThinkStock/Erin McCarthy
ThinkStock/Erin McCarthy

Some situations are just too perfect for words, but these bits of lovely lingo will shorten that list ever so slightly.

1. Petrichor

The scent of rain on dry ground. The word was coined in the 1960s by mineralogists studying the chemical composition of that scent. Petr- is the Greek root for stone, and ichor was the word for the blood-like substance in the veins of the Greek gods. So petrichor would be the divine essence of stone. Breathe it in!

2. Eyesome

Easy on the eyes. Attractive. Said of maidens and majestic views.

3. Toothsome

Delicious. There’s nothing better than a meal that is both toothsome and eyesome.

4. Jucundity

Merry enjoyment, delight. Also commonly spelled “jocundity,” but those repeated u’s are so merry and delightful. 

5. Salubrious

Good for the health. Temperate, comfortable, agreeable. A popular word in old-time tourist brochures, like “Salubrious Southampton,” “Salubrious Singapore,” and “Salubrious Stonehaven: The Sunniest Resort on the Sunny Side of Scotland.” 

6. Voluptuate

To take luxurious pleasure in something. Voluptuate in this list of salubrious words. 

7. Dulciloquent

Having a gentle, sweet way of speaking. From the Latin dulcis, for sweet. If it’s true what they say about catching more flies with honey than with vinegar, dulciloquence will get you far.

8. Snuggery

A cozy little room—exactly the place you want to be in cold weather!

9. Suaviloquence

Soothing, agreeable speech. Ahhh.

10. Euphony

The quality of sounding good or pleasing to the ear. Usually used for words or sentences. Dulciloquent, suaviloquent, euphony might be too much good sounding stuff for anyone to bear. 

11. Viscerotonic

Having a comfort-loving, easygoing, social personality. Coined in the 1950s by a psychologist attempting to correlate body type with personality type. People who were viscerotonic, from “viscera” or internal organs, supposedly had over-developed digestive systems. All the better to voluptuate in a toothsome meal. 

12. Adlubescence

Pleasure, enjoyment. From the Latin allubescere, to gratify. Using this word should bring great adlubescence to those who hear it.

13. Oblectament

A source of delight. In Latin, oblectamentum, plural oblectamenta. It’s important to have some oblectamenta in your life.

14. Pulchritudinous

Beautiful. From the Latin for beauty. Many have complained that the related noun pulchritude (beauty) is, ironically, an ugly word. But pulchritudinous is positively euphonious

15. Philocalist

A lover of beautiful things. If you are a philocalist, you must love all these pulchritudinous words.

The Definition of Museum Could Be Changing

The Louvre Museum in Paris, France.
The Louvre Museum in Paris, France.
roman_slavik/iStock via Getty Images

If you’ve always casually defined museum as “a place to see art or historical objects,” you’re not necessarily wrong. But the International Council of Museums (ICOM) has a more specific, official guideline that defines a museum as “a non-profit, permanent institution in the service of society and its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates, and exhibits the tangible and intangible heritage of humanity and its environment for the purposes of education, study, and enjoyment.”

ICOM’s 40,000 members have been adhering to this definition for almost 50 years to represent more than 20,000 museums around the world. Now, The Art Newspaper reports, some members want to change it.

On July 22, the organization’s executive board convened in Paris and composed a new definition that Danish curator Jette Sandahl believes better suits the demands of “cultural democracy.” By this updated description, a museum must “acknowledg[e] and addres[s] the conflicts and challenges of the present,” “work in active partnership with and for diverse communities to collect, preserve, research, interpret, exhibit, and enhance understandings of the world,” and “contribute to human dignity and social justice, global equality, and planetary wellbeing.”

The proposal immediately elicited harsh reactions from a number of other members of the museum community, who felt the text was too ideological and vague. François Mairesse, a professor at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle and the chair of the International Committee of Museology, even resigned from the revisory commission—led by Sandahl—earlier this summer when he realized the new definition wasn’t, by his standards, really a definition. “This is not a definition but a statement of fashionable values, much too complicated and partly aberrant,” he told The Art Newspaper. “It would be disastrous to impose only one type of museum.”

The current plan is for ICOM members to vote on the definition at the general assembly on September 7 in Kyoto, Japan, but 24 national branches and five museums’ international committees have petitioned to postpone the vote—they’d like some time to create their own definition for museum and present it as a counter-proposal.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

The Ohio State University Is Trying to Trademark the ‘The’ in Its Name

As any good Ohioan knows, there’s a big difference between an Ohio state university and The Ohio State University. But with countless other public colleges across the state, including the similarly named Ohio University, it’s not hard for out-of-towners or prospective students to get confused. To further distinguish themselves from other institutions (and to capitalize on merchandise opportunities, no doubt), The Ohio State University is pursuing a trademark for the The in its name.

According to Smithsonian.com, trademark lawyer Josh Gerben first broke the news on Twitter, where he shared a short video that included the trademark application itself, as well as examples of how the university plans to use the word on apparel. One is a white hat emblazoned with a red THE, and the other is a red scoop-necked T-shirt with a white THE and the Ohio State logo beneath it. Gerben predicts that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office will initially deny the trademark request on the basis that those examples aren’t sufficient trademark use, but the university would have an opportunity to try again.

The Columbus Dispatch reports that university spokesperson Chris Davey confirmed the trademark application, saying that “Ohio State works to vigorously protect the university’s brand and trademarks.” He’s not exaggerating; the university has secured trademarks for legendary coaches Urban Meyer and Woody Hayes, plus more than 150 trademarks and pending applications across an impressive 17 countries.

The school's 2017 request to trademark the initials "OSU" provoked an objection from Oklahoma State University, which is also known as OSU, but the two schools eventually decided that they could both use it, as long as each refrained from producing clothing or content that could cause confusion about which school was being referenced.

The Ohio State University, perhaps most famous for its marching band, public research endeavors, and legendary athletic teams, is not impervious to social media mockery, however.

Ohio University responded with this:

And the University of Michigan, OSU’s longtime sports rival, suggested that it should trademark of:

However bizarre this trademark may seem, it's far from the weirdest request th Patent and Trademark Office has ever received. Check out these colors and scents that are also trademarked.

[h/t Smithsonian.com]

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