Part of the Amazon Thought to Be Uninhabited May Have Been Home to 1 Million People

Aerial photo of site Mt05, a circular enclosure (140 meter diameter) located on a hilltop.
Aerial photo of site Mt05, a circular enclosure (140 meter diameter) located on a hilltop.
José Iriarte

Depictions of the pre-Columbian Amazon basin as dense, inhospitable jungle with just a handful of indigenous communities scattered along the river may need to be updated. According to research published in Nature Communications, there were millions more people living in the rainforest prior to Spanish colonization than previously believed.

The Amazon is the largest rainforest on Earth, which poses a challenge to archaeologists exploring the history of the people who lived there. It's long been assumed that native Amazonians chose to avoid the heart of the forest and instead lived as nomads, never straying far from the major rivers. Some old estimates placed the population of the entire basin between 1.5 and 2 million people.

Thanks to satellites, researchers can now identify traces of long-gone settlements in the less-explored regions of Brazil without having to set foot in the jungle. A team of archaeologists from the University of Exeter used satellite imaging to find geoglyphs—large shapes dug into the ground, possibly for ceremonial purposes—in part of the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso that was thought to be uninhabited.

Geoglyphs and mounded ring villages.
Geoglyphs and mounded ring villages.
Nature Communications, Jonas Gregorio de Souza et al.

After pinpointing the locations of these earthworks, archaeologists visited this section of the southern rim of the Amazon to see some of them in person. At each of the 24 sites they set out to confirm, they found a real-life geoglyph on the ground. At one location, they uncovered charcoal and pottery dating back to 1410 CE. In all, they documented 81 new sites with geoglyphs.

The earthworks would have been carved into the dirt during a seasonal drought, allowing the architects to clear a swath of rainforest. Fortified villages were built in or close to the glyphs, with a network of roads connecting them to each other. The researchers created a computer model that estimated that a 154,000-square-mile patch of land could be home to the remains of 1300 geoglyphs and villages, only two-thirds of which have been discovered. In the late pre-Columbian period, the area, comprising just 7 percent of the Amazon basin, may have sustained a population of 500,000 to 1 million people, according to the researchers' models.

Aerial photo of site ZMt04, which contains the two largest enclosures that were identified.
Aerial photo of site ZMt04, which contains the two largest enclosures that were identified.
José Iriarte

Disease and genocide brought on by the European invasion destroyed most of those settlements, and they were later reclaimed by the rainforest. But evidence of their existence suggests that deforestation and development of the Amazon isn't a new phenomenon.

"Our research shows we need to re-evaluate the history of the Amazon. It certainly wasn't an area populated only near the banks of large rivers, and the people who lived there did change the landscape," researcher José Iriarte said in a statement. "Studies such as ours mean we are gradually piecing together more and more information about the history of the largest rainforest on the planet."

Remains of Late 19th-Century Shipwreck Found on Jersey Shore

iStock.com/Sierra Gaglione
iStock.com/Sierra Gaglione

The holiday season isn't usually associated with the beach, but nature has a funny way of delivering surprises no matter the time of year. The weekend before Christmas, the remains of an old ship stretching over 25 feet long were discovered at the southern area of Stone Harbor beach, according to nj.com.

Local historians believe the vessel is the D.H. Ingraham, a schooner that sank in 1886 during a voyage from Rockland, Maine, to Richmond, Virginia. Archives from the time recount that while the ship was delivering a cargo of lime, it caught fire. Thanks to station employees at the nearby Hereford Lighthouse, all five men aboard were rescued and given proper shelter for the next four days. The rescuers even received medals of honor from Congress, which are still on display inside the lighthouse, according to the Press of Atlantic City.

This is not the only shipwreck to have been discovered along the Jersey Shore; in 2014, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers found one while making repairs to the Barnegat Inlet jetty. (New Jersey has its own Historical Divers Association, and at one point its president, Dan Lieb, estimated that the state had up to 7000 shipwrecks off its coasts.)

To check out more coverage about shipwrecks, like this 48-foot find in Florida earlier this year, click here.

[h/t nj.com]

People Have Been Dining on Caviar Since the Stone Age

iStock.com/Lisovskaya
iStock.com/Lisovskaya

Millennia before caviar became a staple hors d'oeuvre at posh parties, it was eaten from clay pots by Stone Age humans. That's the takeaway of a new study published in the journal PLOS One. As Smithsonian reports, traces of cooked fish roe recovered from an archeological site in Germany show just how far back the history of the dish goes.

For the study, researchers from Germany conducted a protein analysis of charred food remains caked to the shards of an Stone Age clay cooking vessel. After isolating roughly 300 proteins and comparing them to that of boiled fresh fish roe and tissue, they were able to the identify the food scraps as carp roe, or eggs. The scientists write that the 4000 BCE-era hunter-gatherers likely cooked the fish roe in a pot of water or fish broth heated by embers, and covered the pot with leaves to contain the heat or add additional flavor.

The clay shards were recovered from Friesack 4 in Brandenburg, Germany, a Stone Age archaeological site that has revealed about 150,000 artifacts, including items crafted from antlers, wood, and bone, since it was discovered in the 1930s. In the same study, the researchers report that they also found remnants of bone-in pork on a vessel recovered from the same site.

Other archaeological digs have shown that some of the foods we think of as modern delicacies have been around for thousands of years, including cheese, salad dressing, and bone broth. The same goes for beverages: Recently a 13,000-year-old brewery was uncovered in the Middle East.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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