NASA, YouTube
NASA, YouTube

Take an Ultra-Detailed Tour of the Moon With This NASA Video

NASA, YouTube
NASA, YouTube

A new video will give you a tour of the Moon as you've never seen it, courtesy of NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The 4K-resolution visualization posted by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, spotted over at CBS, was created using image data collected by the spacecraft since it began orbiting the Moon in 2009.

NASA narrates a guided tour that explores features like the Moon's South Pole, the famous Tycho Crater, the Aristarchus Plateau, and the Apollo 17 landing site in the Taurus-Littrow Valley.

The high resolution of the imagery allows you to clearly see things like the mysterious 328-foot-wide boulder on top of Tycho Crater's central peak and the Apollo 17 lunar lander and rover that still sit on the surface of the Moon.

The video explains the importance of the sites pictured and what the LRO data can tell us about the Moon's structure and characteristics, like how studying shadows on the Moon's North Pole can help us scope out sites for future solar power generators. Gravity measurements from the Orientale Basin may reveal the structure of the lunar crust there, and temperature readings and reflectance could alert us to potential water ice at the South Pole.

Take your own personal tour of the Moon in the video below.

[h/t CBS]

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ESA/ATG
The European Space Agency Needs Help Naming Its New Mars Rover
ESA/ATG
ESA/ATG

The European Space Agency is hosting a competition to find a snazzy new name for its ExoMars rover, Sky News reports. The rover will be deployed to Mars in 2020, so the winner would be playing a small role in the progress of space exploration.

At the contest's launch, British astronaut Tim Peake described Mars as a place where humans and robots will someday work together to search for evidence of life in our solar system. To this end, the ExoMars rover, which will land on Mars in 2021, will drill up to two meters into the planet’s soil and collect samples, the ESA notes. "The ExoMars rover is a vital part of this journey of exploration, and we're asking you to become part of this exciting mission and name the rover that will scout the Martian surface,” Peake said.

However, the agency is well aware of past public naming contests that have gone horribly wrong (we’re looking at you, Boaty McBoatface), so it’s rigged the rules to prevent such a spectacle. Instead of a public poll, suggestions will be submitted privately to the agency, which has created a panel of judges to choose the winning name.

The winner of the contest will also receive a trip to Stevenage, England, where they’ll get to see the Airbus facility where the rover is being pieced together. The contest is only open to citizens of the two dozen European countries that are partners in the ESA.

To enter, submit your name suggestion online before October 10, 2018, along with a brief explanation (under 150 words) of why your name should be chosen. Click the following PDF link to see the full terms and conditions [PDF].

[h/t Sky News]

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NASA, Getty Images
Watch Apollo 11 Launch
Vice President Spiro Agnew and former President Lyndon Johnson view the liftoff of Apollo 11
Vice President Spiro Agnew and former President Lyndon Johnson view the liftoff of Apollo 11
NASA, Getty Images

Apollo 11 launched on July 16, 1969, on its way to the moon. In the video below, Mark Gray shows slow-motion footage of the launch (a Saturn V rocket) and explains in glorious detail what's going on from a technical perspective—the launch is very complex, and lots of stuff has to happen just right in order to get a safe launch. The video is mesmerizing, the narration is informative. Prepare to geek out about rockets! (Did you know the hold-down arms actually catch on fire after the rocket lifts off?)

Apollo 11 Saturn V Launch (HD) Camera E-8 from Spacecraft Films on Vimeo.

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