Here's How Much It Costs to Have a Baby in America

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iStock

From the time they're conceived to the day they graduate college, children come with a pricey bill—a mix of health care costs, living expenses, education, and other expenses. Not surprisingly, that financial drain begins as soon as you get your first hospital bill following their birth.

According to the The Economist, which cites the International Federation of Health Plans, the average cost of a non-Caesarean delivery in the United States in 2015 was $10,808. When including health care needed both during and after pregnancy, the total is roughly $30,000.

Obviously, those with health insurance aren't burdened with the full amount of that bill. But co-pays, deductibles, and other costs passed to parents mean the average hospital fee is roughly $3000 out of pocket. That cost typically covers the obstetrician's fee, hospital facility fees, and anesthesiology.

This figure can fluctuate depending on which state parents live in. In Alabama, for example, it could cost as little as $5017 to bring your child into the world, while New Yorkers are more likely to field bills in the amount of $8936. Compared to other nations, America usually comes in first on the list of the most expensive places to procreate. If you have a baby in Spain, for example, fees associated with the birth might come to an average $1950.

[h/t The Economist]

Everything You Need to Know About Budgets

Mental Floss via YouTube
Mental Floss via YouTube

Blustery days are finally replacing balmy ones, and that means the holidays are almost here. From booking Thanksgiving airline tickets to buying heartfelt holiday gifts, it’s easy to find yourself a little short on both time and money. In other words: ’tis the season for budgets.

In the latest episode of Scatterbrained, presented by Discover, Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy and friends will walk you through some tips and tricks to help you make a budget—and stick to it.

In addition to learning how to break down your paychecks into categories and knock out your to-do list efficiently, you’ll also delve into the history behind budgets—which didn’t always relate to financial planning. (When William Shakespeare used the word budget in The Winter’s Tale, for example, he was referring to a small purse.)

Find out more—including the surprising thing you have in common with squirrels—in the full video below.

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Splitwise App Makes Splitting the Bill for Dinner, a Trip, Household Bills, or Anything Else Easy

DragonImages/iStock via Getty Images
DragonImages/iStock via Getty Images

Whether it’s from a three-week adventure across Europe or just happy hour drinks around the corner, you’re probably familiar with the headache that is trying to split bills among groups of people. Apps like Venmo and PayPal make the actual money transfer pretty easy, but the onus is still on you to figure out who owes what—and, if you’re the generous friend who always tosses down your credit card, you know that your expectation of getting paid back isn’t always fulfilled.

Splitwise is a free app that helps you organize all of your shared expenses. First, you create a group of people, which you can categorize as “Apartment,” “House,” “Trip,” or “Other.” From there, all you have to do is enter your charges and specify how you’d like them to be split, and the app does the rest.

According to Lifehacker, you can divide bills equally, by percentage, or by amount, and you can even divide a bill equally and then adjust it so someone is paying a little more. In a nutshell, no bill-splitting scenario is too complicated for Splitwise. What if two people split your dinner check between their credit cards, but five people were at dinner? Include all five people in your group, indicate which two paid, and Splitwise will tell you how much the other three owe each of them.

Not only will the app keep you from getting confused or shortchanged, it’ll also keep track of your cumulative expenses so that you and your buddies don’t have to swap sums back and forth every time you have a drink on vacation. If your roommate covers the brunch bill on Saturday morning, for example, but you pay for concert tickets on Saturday night, Splitwise will just subtract your brunch IOU from the ticket expense, and your roommate pays the difference.

You can also upload images of receipts, set up recurring charges, and pay users through the app via Venmo or PayPal.

In addition to saving time and effort, Splitwise gets rid of the awkward gray area when it comes to deciding if things are even. Buying your friend a cup of coffee or a movie ticket isn’t usually a big deal, but those instances can leave you constantly feeling like people owe you money, or worse—wondering if other people feel like you owe them money. With Splitwise, you’ll actually know.

Download: iOS, Android

[h/t Lifehacker]

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