15 (Mostly) Normal Foods That Are Banned in Countries Around the World

iStock
iStock

Could you live without ketchup, chewing gum, or delightfully stinky French cheese? Depending on where you live, you might not have a choice.

An infographic created by Magnet, a kitchen retailer in the UK, reveals 15 foods that have been banned around the world. Most of the items have been banned due to health concerns, but there are a few surprises on the list.

France, for instance, practically outlawed mayonnaise and ketchup in schools in an effort to uphold its culinary traditions, which apparently don’t include drowning a hot dog in sugary tomato syrup. “We have to ensure children become familiar with French recipes so that they can hand them down to the following generation,” Christophe Hebert of the National Association of Directors of Collective Restaurants said at the time of the ban in 2011. One day a week, though, students are permitted to eat their frites with ketchup.

Russia’s ban on foreign cheese and meat imports in 2017 was primarily political, but cheesemakers in the country weren’t complaining about the boost in business they received soon after. Singapore’s 1992 crackdown on chewing gum, meanwhile, was enacted in an effort to make the streets less sticky. Indeed, Singapore consistently ranks among the world’s cleanest cities.

The U.S. forbids several items from being sold, including haggis, black pudding, and ackee fruit—the latter of which can induce "Jamaican Vomiting Sickness" if it's eaten before it's ripe.

Scroll down to learn more about the rationale behind 15 banned foods around the world.

Save More, Lose Less: How New Year's Resolutions Have Changed Over the Past Year

iStock.com/SIphotography
iStock.com/SIphotography

The top New Year’s Resolutions are easy to predict each year, but they’re not as concrete and unchanging as you might expect. Sure, everyone and their brother wants to lose weight or save money, but Americans’ collective priorities have shifted slightly since last year.

Offers.com polled 1000 Americans about their goals for the upcoming year, and the main takeaways are that more people want to save money and fewer people want to lose weight. Although fitness is still the top resolution, it’s trending downward. Compared with the 41 percent of respondents who wanted to exercise more or shed a few pounds in 2018, just 38 percent have the same motive heading into 2019.

On the other hand, the desire to save money has risen by six percentage points over the last year. Offers.com predicts more people will be buying subscriptions to video streaming services (like Netflix and Hulu) as well as kitchen appliances in an effort to cut out cable costs and restaurant bills.

We all know that Millennials tend to value experiences more than things, but it seems more and more people across the board are vowing to travel more in 2019. It’s the top resolution in a few states, including Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Oklahoma, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington. Everywhere else in the country, people are dreaming of bigger bank accounts and smaller waists, with the exception of Nevada. Residents in the Silver State just want to make sterling new friendships.

Check out the infographic below to see the results from this year and last year.

An infographic of New Year's Resolutions by percentage
Offers.com

Whatever you choose as your New Year’s Resolution, be sure to make 2019 the year you achieve all of your goals. To help, we’ve crafted a list of 10 scientifically proven ways to stick to your resolution.

Here's How Much it Would Cost to Build Hogwarts in Real Life

Warner Home Video
Warner Home Video

At some point, every Harry Potter fan has dreamed of going to Hogwarts. But a lack of magical ability isn't the only reason that the School of Witchcraft and Wizardry will have to remain in the realm of fantasy. Even recreating the physical structure would be nearly impossible in real life ... unless you're a billionaire looking to burn a lot of cash.

​BigRentz, an online marketplace for renting construction equipment, recently calculated the costs of building various fictional locations, such as Batman's Bat Cave, The Wall from Game of Thrones, and you guessed it—Hogwarts. And it turns out, magical castles are even more expensive than you might think.

According to the company's calculations, the castle itself would cost $169,740,000. Built in the style of Windsor Castle, Hogwarts stretches over 414,000 square feet. The Great Hall, which measures 5800 square feet, would alone cost a whopping $870,000.

Moving beyond the castle walls, the eight greenhouses would cost $175,000, and Hagrid's hut would come in at $400,000. Building the Quidditch pitch would cost another $1,031,980. And for the One-Eyed Witch Passage running between Hogwarts and Honeydukes? A full $2,490,000.

In total, BigRentz calculates that Hogwarts's construction bill would come to a whopping $174.5 million. And that's just construction costs. The cost of furnishing, supplying, and running the school—where tuition is free—would add significantly to that figure.

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