The Right Way to Hold Your Cat, According to a Vet

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iStock

Every cat parent has experienced the soul-crushing rejection of picking up their kitty for some cuddles, only for Fluffy to fight for freedom, occasionally leaving behind a nasty trail of scratches. The good news is that your cat probably doesn't hate you—you might just be holding him wrong.

There are a few ways to avoid having to break out the first aid kit, all while making your cat feel more comfortable and secure. In a video spotted by IFL Science, veterinarian Uri Burstyn of the Helpful Vancouver Vet YouTube page used cat models Claudia and Pirate to demonstrate some proper handling techniques.

There are a few different maneuvers you can use, depending on your cat’s personality and what you’re trying to accomplish—whether it be picking them up for some cuddles or holding them down to get them to swallow a pill. First, Dr. Burstyn advises pet owners to approach with caution, letting the cat sniff your fingers or giving her some gentle tickles under the chin.

If the cat seems receptive, you can now pick him or her up. Dr. Burstyn notes that “the key to picking up a cat safely is to make them feel supported.” Let’s say you want to remove your cat from the kitchen counter for the thousandth time: Place one hand under the cat’s chest, another under the abdomen, and lift gently. This prevents the cat from kicking its hind legs in an attempt to gain ground, which is one of the most common causes of scratches, Dr. Burstyn says.

Whether you’re holding a cat in your arms or trying to stop them from running away, the key is cat squishing. Yes, really. Gently press down on a cat that’s trying to wriggle its way out of your grasp. If you're holding the cat, pull it closer to your body.

“If we do have a cat who’s trying to get away from us, we always squish that cat,” Dr. Burstyn says. “You don’t have to worry about hurting a cat. They’re very tough little beasts and just squishing them against your body is never going to do them any harm. In fact, they tend to feel more safe and secure when they’re being held tightly.”

There’s another hold that Dr. Burstyn calls the “football carry,” which involves scooping up the cat so that its head is tucked between your arm and your torso. One hand supports its abdomen while another supports its bottom. This is best for emergency situations when you need to move your pet quickly.

And if you happen to have a “shoulder cat” like Pirate, they’ll do most of the work themselves by climbing onto your shoulder, but there’s still a proper holding technique. Support their butt with one hand, and when you’re ready to put them down, slowly lean forward while still supporting their bottom until they twist around and hop back on their feet.

Of course, some cats simply don't like to be held, so it's important to pay attention to their body language. A low tail and flattened ears are both signs that your feline probably wants to be left alone, according to Mother Nature Network.

For more on Dr. Burstyn's tips, check out the video below.

[h/t IFL Science]

Fossilized Fat Shows 550-Million-Year-Old Sea Creature May Have Been the World's First Animal

Ilya Bobrovskiy, the Australian National University
Ilya Bobrovskiy, the Australian National University

A bizarre sea creature whose fossils look like a cross between a leaf and a fingerprint may be Earth's oldest known animal, dating back 558 million years.

As New Scientist reports, researchers from the Australian National University (ANU) made a fortunate find in a remote region of Russia: a Dickinsonia fossil with fat molecules still attached. These odd, oval-shaped creatures were soft-bodied, had rib structures running down their sides, and grew about 4.5 feet long. They were as “strange as life on another planet,” researchers wrote in the abstract of a new paper published in the journal Science.

Another variety of fossil
Ilya Bobrovskiy, the Australian National University

Although Dickinsonia fossils were first discovered in South Australia in 1946, researchers lacked the organic matter needed to classify this creature. "Scientists have been fighting for more than 75 years over what Dickinsonia and other bizarre fossils of the Edicaran biota were: giant single-celled amoeba, lichen, failed experiments of evolution, or the earliest animals on Earth,” senior author Jochen Brocks, an associate professor at ANU, said in a statement.

With the discovery of cholesterol molecules—which are found in almost all animals, but not in other organisms like bacteria and amoebas—scientists can say that Dickinsonia were animals. The creatures swam the seas during the Ediacaran Period, 635 million to 542 million years ago. More complex organisms like mollusks, worms, and sponges didn’t emerge until 20 million years later.

The fossil with fat molecules was found on cliffs near the White Sea in an area of northwest Russia that was so remote that researchers had to take a helicopter to get there. Collecting the samples was a death-defying feat, too.

“I had to hang over the edge of a cliff on ropes and dig out huge blocks of sandstone, throw them down, wash the sandstone, and repeat this process until I found the fossils I was after,” lead author Ilya Bobrovskiy of ANU said. Considering that this find could change our understanding of Earth’s earliest life forms, it seems the risk was worth it.

[h/t New Scientist]

Cats Take Turns Napping With the 75-Year-Old Star Volunteer at This Animal Shelter

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iStock

The star volunteer at Safe Haven Pet Sanctuary in Wisconsin doesn't have to do much to make a cat's day. According to Huffington Post, Terry Lauerman, a 75-year-old from Green Bay, visits his local shelter every day to take a cat nap with the residents.

Safe Haven is a cage-free, no-kill animal shelter that gives a home to special needs cats at risk of being put down. When Lauerman first showed up at Safe Haven earlier this year, he didn't talk to the shelter employees about becoming a volunteer—instead, he waltzed in and started grooming the cats with a brush he had brought himself. After this continued for a while, the shelter decided to make his volunteer status official.

Lauerman has since settled into a daily routine. After brushing the cats, he tends to fall asleep with them, and after an hour or so he wakes up and finds a different cat to nod off with. Safe Haven recently shared his story on their Facebook page: "We are so lucky to have a human like Terry," the post reads. "He brushes all of the cats, and can tell you about all of their likes and dislikes. He also accidentally falls asleep most days. We don't mind—Cats need this!"

The post has since been liked by over 68,000 people and shared more than 18,000 times. Safe Haven wrote in the comments, "When Terry comes in today, I'm going to have to tell him that he's famous. I can almost guarantee he'll just laugh and say "Oh, really?"...shake his head...and then go back to brushing cats." Lauerman is also encouraging fans of the viral post to show their appreciation by donating to the shelter, which ends up with more medical bills than many shelters that don't have cats with disabilities. You can contribute cash here or make a donation through the shelter's Amazon wish list.

[h/t Huffington Post]

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