From Camreigh to Kayzleigh: Parents Invented More Than 1000 New Baby Names Last Year

iStock
iStock

Look out Mercedes, Bentley, and Royce—there's a new car-inspired name in town. The name Camreigh was recorded for the first time in the U.S. last year, according to Quartz’s take on data released by the U.S. Social Security Administration.

The name was given to 91 babies in 2017, making it the most popular of the 1100 brand-new names that cropped up last year. However, the Social Security Administration only listed names that had been given to at least five babies in 2017, so it's possible that some of the names had been invented before 2017.

An alternate spelling, Kamreigh, also appeared for the first time last year, as did Brexleigh, Kayzleigh, Addleigh, Iveigh, Lakeleigh, and Riverleigh. Swapping out “-y” and “-ey” for “-eigh” at the end of a name has been a growing trend in recent years, and in 20 years or so, the workforce will be filled with Ryleighs, Everleighs, and Charleighs—names that all appeared on a list of the 500 most popular names in 2017.

Following Camreigh, the second most popular new name, appearing 58 times, was Asahd. Meaning “lion” in Arabic, Asahd was popularized in 2016 when DJ Khaled gave his son the name. The American DJ is now attempting to trademark the moniker, which is an alternate spelling of Asad and Assad.

Other names that were introduced for the first time include Iretomiwa (of Nigerian origin) and Tewodros (Ethiopian). The name Arjunreddy (given 12 times) possibly stems from the 2017 release of the Indian, Telugu-language film Arjun Reddy, whose title character is a surgeon who spirals out of control when he turns to alcohol and drugs.

Perhaps an even bigger surprise is the fact that 11 babies were named Cersei in 2017, or, as Quartz puts it, "11 fresh-faced, sinless babies were named after the manipulative, power-hungry, incestuous, helicopter parent-y, backstabbing character from Game of Thrones."

Below are the top 20 most popular new names in 2017.

1. Camreigh
2. Asahd
3. Taishmara
4. Kashdon
5. Teylie
6. Kassian
7. Kior
8. Aaleiya
9. Kamreigh
10. Draxler
11. Ikeni
12. Noctis
13. Sayyora
14. Mohana
15. Dakston
16. Knoxlee
17. Amunra
18. Arjunreddy
19. Irtaza
20. Ledgen

[h/t Quartz]

Some of Your Favorite Disney Characters and Scenes Might Be Recycled From Earlier Films

If you’ve ever thought to yourself that Baloo from The Jungle Book (1967) and Little John from Robin Hood (1973) look eerily similar, that’s because the latter was directly copied from the former. Ahead of International Animation Day on October 28, the Cartoon Hangover YouTube channel has tackled the thorny issue of why Disney—and many other film studios, for that matter—recycled old content.

It can all be traced back to Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), which was partly made through rotoscoping. This technique involved tracing over live-action scenes to make the animation look more realistic, and it was a common practice in the early days of film. (In more recent years, Richard Linklater did it with 2001's Waking Life and 2006's A Scanner Darkly.) That opened the floodgates, and beginning with Disney's Dumbo in 1941, studio directors decided to start copying scenes from earlier Disney movies.

This change in animation philosophy followed a series of commercial losses—including Pinocchio, Fantasia, and Bambi, all of which went over budget—and the practice was purportedly done to save time and money. However, former Disney animator Floyd Norman tells Cartoon Hangover it actually made their jobs more difficult.

“I don’t think it saved much time and I don’t think it saved much money because it was more of a hassle to go dig this old footage out of the archive,” he said. “It would’ve been easier to just sit down and animate a new scene than go back and try to retrofit all this old stuff to something new.”

Norman says he doesn’t think Walt Disney even noticed that scenes were being recycled because “his mind was always on the big picture.” The practice continued after Disney's death, and some of the worst offenders are The Jungle Book, Robin Hood, and The Sword in the Stone (1963). Of course, after the rise of the VHS tape, the practice became riskier because people started watching and rewatching their favorite Disney films. In other words, fans were more likely to notice the recycled scenes.

Check out Cartoon Hangover’s video below to see if any of your favorite Disney scenes or characters have been lifted from another film.

Why Are We So Scared of Clowns?

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.

With the recent box office-smashing success of Stephen King's It, it’s safe to say that coulrophobia (fear of clowns) isn’t a fringe phenomenon. The colorful circus performers are right up there with vampires and werewolves on the list of iconic horror villains. But unlike other movie monsters, clowns were originally meant to make kids laugh, not hide under their beds in terror. So what is it about clowns that taps into our deepest fears?

According to Yale doctoral candidate Danielle Bainbridge, the unsettling clown stereotype goes back centuries. In the inaugural episode of the PBS digital series Origin of Everything, Bainbridge explained the long history of this pervasive part of our culture.

Before clowns wore floppy shoes and threw pies at each other’s faces, early versions of the performers could be found in royal courts. The court jester wasn’t evil, but he was the only person in the kingdom who could poke fun at the monarch without fear of (literally) losing his head. The fact that fools didn’t fall within the normal social hierarchy may have contributed to the future role clowns would play as untrustworthy outsiders.

From the medieval era, clowns evolved into the harlequins of 16th-century Italian theater. Again, these weren’t bloodthirsty monsters, but they weren’t exactly kid-friendly either. The characters were often mischievous and morally bankrupt, and their strange costumes and masks only added to the creepy vibes they gave off.

Fast-forward to the 19th century, when the white-faced circus clowns we know today started gaining popularity. Unlike the jesters and harlequins that came before them, these clowns performed primarily for children and maintained a wholesome image. But as pop culture in the 1970s, '80s, and '90s showed us, that old perception we had of clowns as nefarious troublemakers never really went away. Steven King’s It, the cult classic Killer Clowns From Outer Space (1988), and that scene from Poltergeist (1982) all combined these original fears with the more modern association of clowns with children. That formula gave us one of the most frightening figures in horror media today.

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