Which is the Largest National Park in the World?

Lieutenant Elizabeth Crapo, NOAA Corps, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons
Lieutenant Elizabeth Crapo, NOAA Corps, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Ben Waggoner:

A couple of folks have listed Northeast Greenland National Park, at 927,000 square kilometers (375,000 square miles). But the U.S. has a larger reserve. It’s not officially called a National Park, but it is a National Monument. (The difference is that National Parks can only be created by an act of Congress, but a President can declare any federally owned territory in the U.S. as a National Monument. Many National Monuments have gone on to be declared National Parks, and most are managed by the National Park System, although this one is managed by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, or the NOAA.) So you can decide whether you want to let this "count" as the largest national park; even though its official designation is National Monument, it’s a national park for all intents and purposes.

May I introduce you to the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument—1,510,000 square kilometers, or 583,000 square miles, and almost all of it water, although it includes 10 islands.

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
Quora

I don’t say this often, but I appreciate George W. Bush, for having created this monument in June 2006 (as the Northwest Hawaiian Islands National Monument). Almost all of it was already part of the State of Hawaii, although no one was living on any of the islands. It includes some earlier refuges and monuments, such as the Battle of Midway National Memorial. It was expanded in 2016 to the edges of the 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zone.

The monument protects 7000 species of marine animals, as well as birds and plants, including many endangered ones, and many fish and shellfish populations that have not yet recovered from overfishing in the 1980s and 1990s. (You can learn more at the official Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument website.)

It doesn’t look like much on the surface:

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
Quora

But the view from below is pretty good:

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
Quora

This post originally appeared on Quora. Click here to view.

Why is Winnie the Pooh Called a Pooh?

iStock.com/CatLane
iStock.com/CatLane

Since A.A. Milne published the first official Winnie the Pooh story in 1926, the character has become beloved by children across many generations. Milne’s writing clearly struck a chord, and the character’s many subsequent TV and film adaptations have endeared him to an even wider audience.

But why is Winnie called a Pooh rather than a bear? Given that most children (and grown-ups, for that matter) have a different idea of what a Pooh is, how has the name stuck?

The answer lies back in the 1920s.

In fact, when first introduced by Milne, Winnie wasn’t even Winnie. Initially, he went by the name of Edward Bear, before changing to Winnie in time for that aforementioned official 1926 debut. The "Winnie" part of the name came from a visit to the London Zoo, where Milne saw a black bear who had been named after the city of Winnipeg, Canada.

As for Pooh? Well, originally Pooh was a swan, a different character entirely.

In the book When We Were Very Young (the same book that introduced Edward Bear), Milne wrote a poem, telling how Christopher Robin would feed the swan in the mornings.

He told how Christopher Robin had given the swan the name "Pooh," explaining that “this is a very fine name for a swan, because if you call him and he doesn’t come (which is a thing swans are good at), then you can pretend that you were just saying ‘Pooh!’ to show him how little you wanted him."

Milne indeed knew what he was doing by using such a word. The names "Winnie" and "Pooh" were soon brought together, and Winnie the Pooh was born. Milne still took a little time out to explain why Winnie was a Pooh, though.

As he would write in the first chapter of the first Winnie the Pooh book, “But his arms were so stiff ... they stayed up straight in the air for more than a week, and whenever a fly came and settled on his nose he had to blow it off. And I think—but I am not sure—that that is why he is always called Pooh."

It's not the most convincing explanation, but it's a formal explanation nonetheless.

Not that the reasoning ultimately mattered too much. The name stuck, having never seen a focus group in its life. A much loved childhood character, with a vaguely funny name, would go on to superstardom. And even be honored with his own holiday, Winnie the Pooh Day, which occurs annually on January 18th.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

Why is Winnie the Pooh Called a Pooh?

iStock.com/CatLane
iStock.com/CatLane

Since A.A. Milne published the first official Winnie the Pooh story in 1926, the character has become beloved by children across many generations. Milne’s writing clearly struck a chord, and the character’s many subsequent TV and film adaptations have endeared him to an even wider audience.

But why is Winnie called a Pooh rather than a bear? Given that most children (and grown-ups, for that matter) have a different idea of what a Pooh is, how has the name stuck?

The answer lies back in the 1920s.

In fact, when first introduced by Milne, Winnie wasn’t even Winnie. Initially, he went by the name of Edward Bear, before changing to Winnie in time for that aforementioned official 1926 debut. The "Winnie" part of the name came from a visit to the London Zoo, where Milne saw a black bear who had been named after the city of Winnipeg, Canada.

As for Pooh? Well, originally Pooh was a swan, a different character entirely.

In the book When We Were Very Young (the same book that introduced Edward Bear), Milne wrote a poem, telling how Christopher Robin would feed the swan in the mornings.

He told how Christopher Robin had given the swan the name "Pooh," explaining that “this is a very fine name for a swan, because if you call him and he doesn’t come (which is a thing swans are good at), then you can pretend that you were just saying ‘Pooh!’ to show him how little you wanted him."

Milne indeed knew what he was doing by using such a word. The names "Winnie" and "Pooh" were soon brought together, and Winnie the Pooh was born. Milne still took a little time out to explain why Winnie was a Pooh, though.

As he would write in the first chapter of the first Winnie the Pooh book, “But his arms were so stiff ... they stayed up straight in the air for more than a week, and whenever a fly came and settled on his nose he had to blow it off. And I think—but I am not sure—that that is why he is always called Pooh."

It's not the most convincing explanation, but it's a formal explanation nonetheless.

Not that the reasoning ultimately mattered too much. The name stuck, having never seen a focus group in its life. A much loved childhood character, with a vaguely funny name, would go on to superstardom. And even be honored with his own holiday, Winnie the Pooh Day, which occurs annually on January 18th.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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