Country Time Is Paying Off Fines on Kids' Lemonade Stands

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iStock

A summer staple has come under threat. “The Man” is cracking down on makeshift lemonade stands across the country and busting kids without business permits. Thankfully, one beverage maker is here to help.

As CNN reports, Country Time—known for its powdered lemonade mix—has started a legal fund to help pay off the fines and permit fees incurred by little lemonade hucksters. The company has vowed to cover fees of up to $300 for each business permit bought this year, as well as fines on lemonade stands that were shut down in 2017 and 2018.

The initiative, dubbed Legal-Ade, was reportedly inspired by an incident that occurred in Denver just last week in which two brothers who were selling lemonade for charity were forced to close down shop because they didn’t have a permit. In recent years, similar cases have been reported in Texas, Maryland, Iowa, Georgia, and more. Some fines have climbed as high as $500.

“When we saw these stories about lemonade stands being shut down for legal reasons, we thought it had to be an urban myth,” Adam Butler, an executive at Kraft Heinz, which owns Country Time, told CNN. “A very real response seemed the best way to shine a light on the issue."

The company posted a playful advertisement on YouTube showing a group of hard-nosed lawyers crossing their arms and cracking their knuckles behind a child’s lemonade stand. “Entrepreneurship? Good work habits? Good old-fashioned fun? Shut down because of old, arcane, but very real laws,” declares a voice in the video. “Tastes like justice,” one man in a suit says after downing his lemonade and crushing the plastic cup in one fist.

The company says it’s prepared to cover up to $60,000 in fees. To apply for some lemonade relief, head to Country Time’s website and upload a scanned copy of your child’s fine or permit receipt.

[h/t CNN]

Only Real Fashionistas Will Be Able to Identify All These Popular Patterns

Can You Solve Elon Musk's Favorite Brain Teaser?

Joe Scarnici, Getty Images/Best Events
Joe Scarnici, Getty Images/Best Events

"You're standing on the surface of the Earth. You walk one mile south, one mile west, and one mile north. You end up exactly where you started. Where are you?" This is the question that entrepreneur Elon Musk reportedly likes to ask candidates who interview for positions at SpaceX. The brainteaser was divulged in a 2015 biography about Musk, but it was recently revived when CNBC took to the streets of New York City to see if random passersby could get it right.

Before we reveal the answer below, a bit of background first. Big companies—especially ones in the technology industry—have been known to ask tricky interview questions that read like riddles. In the past, Google interviewees have been asked, "How many people are using Facebook in San Francisco at 2:30 p.m. on a Friday?" Hewlett-Packard has opted for the question, "If Germans were the tallest people in the world, how would you prove it?" And you've probably heard some variation of a question related to golf or tennis balls.

The purpose of these questions it not to make you feel dumb, but to see how you process information and solve complex problems. Interviewers are checking your analytical skills, and whether or not you arrive at the correct answer is almost secondary. But for the fun of it, keep reading to see if you nailed Musk's interview question. Are you ready? The answer is the North Pole. If you follow the directions in the question, you'd make a triangular path and end up back where you started.

There's another possible answer, but it's a little more complicated. The place in question is a circle with a one-mile circumference around the South Pole, and you'd start walking one mile north of it. "You'll walk one mile south to reach this circle, trace that mile-long circle's path, and return one mile north to your starting point," CNBC notes. (If you're having trouble visualizing it, check out this video from Business Insider, which offers a handy illustration.)

If you didn't get it right, don't feel too bad. Most of the New Yorkers who were polled didn't know the answer, either. Fortunately, this question probably won't come up in your average interview.

[h/t CNBC]

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