Beatles Fans Can Soon Visit the Liverpool Site That Inspired 'Strawberry Fields Forever'

Christopher Furlong, Getty Images
Christopher Furlong, Getty Images

Strawberry fields, as it turns out, aren’t always forever. The Liverpool children’s home that inspired the 1967 Beatles hit "Strawberry Fields Forever" shut down in 2005, and over the years, a stone wall on the property became covered in graffiti.

But as the BBC reports, Strawberry Field will be getting a new lease on life as a tourist attraction. The Salvation Army will be reopening the famous red gates next summer, and visitors will have the chance to stroll through the grounds that John Lennon once played on as a child. It was this landscape that later inspired him to write "Strawberry Fields Forever" for the Magical Mystery Tour album.

“It’s a very special place to him, and the song 'Strawberry Fields' is known to be, on record, John’s own favorite song," Lennon’s sister, Julia Baird, told the BBC. As a child, Lennon lived near the children's center with his Aunt Mimi, and he often visited Strawberry Field to play with other children and listen to the Salvation Army band, Paste Magazine reports.

Lennon’s connection to the site will be shared in a public exhibition that will be displayed inside a visitor center, and a cafe and gardens will also be open to guests. In addition, the Salvation Army is raising funds to build a training center on site for young people with learning disabilities.

[h/t BBC]

10 Travel Hacks That Will Save You Time and Money

iStock.com/a_namenko
iStock.com/a_namenko

Traveling can be one of life's greatest experiences, but if things go wrong, you might wish you had stayed at home. In an effort to help you spend less and stress less on your next vacation, the London Luton Airport has created an infographic containing helpful travel advice.

Some of the tips are gentle reminders—like book your flights early, avoid peak traveling seasons, and please be nice to the airline staff—while others are less obvious. For instance, it's best to avoid flying over a seven-night block of time. If you book flights over a period of six or eight nights instead, "you've got a better chance of scoring a lower fare," the airport claims. (Also worth noting: If you're flying domestic in the U.S., the cheapest days to travel are usually Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays, according to Fare Compare. For international flights, weekdays are typically cheaper, although it depends on the exact route.)

In general, anything you can take care of in advance is a good idea. Check to see if you can get a better parking rate by pre-paying online, and take the time to apply for a TSA PreCheck. It's easy to do, and when it's all said and done, you'll be able to join the express line at airport security. If only Starbucks had a fast lane, too.

Keep scrolling to read more advice from the London Luton Airport, and for more travel tips, check out Mental Floss's guides to booking flights, packing a suitcase, and crafting the perfect itinerary.

10 TRAVEL HACKS TO SAVE YOU TIME AND MONEY

Climate Change Is Threatening Nearly All UNESCO Sites Around the Mediterranean

iStock.com/tunart
iStock.com/tunart

The Mediterranean is home to some of the world's most famous cultural wonders, with 49 UNESCO-recognized world heritage sites in the region in total. Now, the organization warns that all but two of these sites are threatened by flooding and erosion linked to climate change, Artnet News reports.

For a recent study, published in the journal Nature Communications, a team of researchers looked at how various possible outcomes of rising sea levels could impact the Mediterranean coast between now and 2100. They found that even if global temperatures rise just 2°C (about 3.6°F) above pre-industrial numbers, the area's most treasured sites will still be at risk.

The places most vulnerable to rising sea levels include the Patriarchal Basilica of Aquileia, the Renaissance city of Ferrara, and the city of Venice. When it comes to erosion, Tyre in Lebanon, the archaeological sites of Tárraco in Spain, and the Ephesus in Turkey face the most pressing danger.

A handful of world heritage sites along the Mediterranean Sea, like the Early Christian Monuments of Ravenna and the Cathedral of St. James, could potentially be relocated as an extreme final option. Only two sites on the list—Medina of Tunis and Xanthos-Letoon—would be safe from the flooding and erosion spurred by climate change.

Rising global temperatures are on track to reshape coasts, not just in the Mediterranean, but around the world. In addition to historic sites, homes and airports are also under threat.

[h/t Artnet News]

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