You Could Own This Historic English Mansion for Less Than $20

Courtesy of James Congdon
Courtesy of James Congdon

Have you always wanted to live in a sprawling English estate? This could be your lucky day.

The owners of Dancers Hill House have launched a contest to win this luxury mansion, which was built circa 1760 and has four acres of grounds including a lake stocked with fish. There's an entry fee of £13.50 (less than $17), but considering the property is worth close to $7 million, it's a pretty good deal. You can also enter more than once if you want to up your odds.

It gets better: According to a press release, the North London house was the "backdrop" of Masterpiece's 1999 adaptation of Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, which starred Ioan Gruffudd, Charlotte Rampling, and Justine Waddell.

Dancers Hill House
Courtesy of James Congdon

The estate has a rich history. Around 1500, the land originally housed a manor that Elizabeth I is rumored to have stayed in. The current structure was built around 1760 as a folly: a grand decorative structure that rich people in the 18th century liked to build on their land just for fun. It was eventually extended several times and transformed into a habitable home in the 19th century. During WWII, it was used as a camp for Italian prisoners of war.

The secluded, 7500-square-foot mansion has since been renovated to include six bedrooms and six bathrooms, along with amenities like a movie theater, gym, wine room, and a conservatory. It's been a family home for the last 30 years, but after watching their kids grow up and leave the nest, the owners are ready to move on. It's the perfect abode for anyone with a brooding Dickensian soul.

You have until December 16, 2018 to enter. And if you win, you owe it to yourself—and Dickens—to rename it Satis House.

Sesame Street and Game of Thrones Collide in This Epic Crossover

Sesame Workshop, YouTube
Sesame Workshop, YouTube

In the much-debated discussion over who will sit on the Iron Throne in the final season of HBO’s Game of Thrones, few have stopped to consider the possibility of Elmo. And yet that potential exists in some small measure, as the Sesame Street character is seen visiting King’s Landing in this public service announcement recently released on YouTube by Sesame Workshop.

In the clip, Elmo is seen sitting down with Cersei Lannister (Lena Headey) and Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage) to discuss their animosity. In typical Elmo fashion, he’s looking for the two to settle their differences. You can watch the video to see if he manages to convince them that mutual respect is in their best interests.

In 2015, HBO became the exclusive first-run home of Sesame Street, with episodes premiering on the network several months before they air on PBS. While Elmo would seem an unlikely presence on Game of Thrones, it’s probably better than having him pop up on Deadwood or Oz. The final season of Game of Thrones is currently airing and concludes May 19.

[h/t Deadline]

Trivial Pursuit Has Launched a Shakespeare Edition

Oli Scarff, Getty Images
Oli Scarff, Getty Images

Do you know which year William Shakespeare died? Can you recall some of the less memorable facts about his plays, like the name of the nobleman who was in love with Desdemona in Othello? If so, you have pretty good odds of crushing the competition while playing this Shakespeare edition of Trivial Pursuit.

According to British station ITV, the game can now be purchased online and in stores from The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust—and yes, there’s international shipping. Proceeds from the game help support the five Shakespeare family homes and programs that are currently managed by the Trust, which is based in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Ideal for travel, this “bitesize” game doesn’t come with a board. Instead, it has a die, a wedge holder, and 100 cards containing 600 questions. Players will be quizzed in six categories that span Shakespeare’s life and work, including comedies, tragedies, histories, characters, biography, and legacy.

While the questions will certainly be challenging, they won’t be “too obtuse,” according to Shakespeare scholar Nick Walton, who designed the questions alongside another Shakespeare expert, Anjna Chouhan.

“Most people will know something about Shakespeare, whether it’s his works or life and history,” Chouhan said in a statement. “But everyone’s knowledge is so different, which is why writing 600 questions for a broad audience was quite challenging and, hopefully, really rewarding for players to answer.”

Get the game for £13 (about $17) on the Trust’s website

[h/t ITV]

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