Mild Dehydration Could Mess Up Your Concentration

iStock
iStock

Research has already shown us that enduring a heat wave without air conditioning can impair our mental performance. Now, a new paper reported by NPR shows that not drinking enough water in the summertime can have a similar impact. According to a meta-analysis published in July in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, even mild dehydration can negatively affect cognition.

Mindy Millard-Stafford, director of the Exercise Physiology Laboratory at Georgia Institute of Technology, looked at 33 studies dealing with dehydration. She found that subjects performed worse in a range of areas—including attention, motor coordination, and goal-oriented thinking—when they were slightly dehydrated compared to when they had consumed enough water that day.

She defined mild dehydration as fluid loss equivalent to about 2 percent of body mass. On a hot summer day, reaching this stage can happen surprisingly fast. If you're hiking in the heat, it might take you an hour to become mildly dehydrated, and if you're going on an intense run, it can take just 30 minutes to sweat out 2 percent of your mass.

That level of dehydration isn't too noticeable (you may just start to feel thirsty), but if you have to do something that requires your full attention, it makes a big difference. In one study published last year, female subjects who were 1 percent dehydrated made 12 percent more errors while playing a game that required them to think quickly. (That paper was funded by PepsiCo, which sells bottled-water brands like Aquafina and Propel, but the researchers designed the study independently, according to NPR.)

Luckily, the brain fog that comes with dehydration has a simple antidote: a glass of water. The biggest roadblock keeping you from staying hydrated may be your inability to recognize dehydration in the first place. To see if you're getting enough water, use this easy skin test throughout the day.

[h/t NPR]

From Cocaine to Chloroform: 28 Old-Timey Medical Cures

YouTube
YouTube

Is your asthma acting up? Try eating only boiled carrots for a fortnight. Or smoke a cigarette. Have you got a toothache? Electrotherapy might help (and could also take care of that pesky impotence problem). When it comes to our understanding of medicine and illnesses, we’ve come a long way in the past few centuries. Still, it’s always fascinating to take a look back into the past and remember a time when cocaine was a common way to treat everything from hay fever to hemorrhoids.

In this week's all-new edition of The List Show, Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy is highlighting all sorts of bizarre, old-timey medical cures. You can watch the full episode below.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here.

Game of Thrones Star Sophie Turner Opened Up About Her Struggles With Depression

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

Playing one of the main characters on the most popular show currently on television isn't always as glamorous as it seems. Sometimes, the pressures of fame can be too much. Sophie Turner realized this while playing Sansa Stark on Game of Thrones, and has recently revealed how being in the public eye took a toll on her mental health.

Turner took on the role of Sansa Stark in 2011, when she was just a teenager, and she quickly became a household name. Now, at 23, she's come forward to Dr. Phil on his podcast Phil in the Blanks to explain how negative comments on social media affected her self-image and mental health.

"I would just believe it. I would say, ‘Yeah, I am spotty. I am fat. I am a bad actress.' I would just believe it," Turned explained. "I would get [the costume department] to tighten my corset a lot. I just got very, very self-conscious."

Later on, these feelings led to major depression. Turner developed a sense of isolation after she realized that all of her friends and family were going off to colleege while she was pursuing a sometimes-lonely acting career.

"I had no motivation to do anything or go out. Even with my best friends, I wouldn't want to see them, I wouldn't want to go out and eat with them," Turner explained. "I just would cry and cry and cry over just getting changed and putting on clothes and be like, 'I can't do this. I can't go outside. I have nothing that I want to do.'"

The feelings of depression stayed with Turner for most of the time she was filming Game of Thrones, and it's a battle she's still fighting. "I've suffered with my depression for five or six years now. The biggest challenge for me is getting out of bed and getting out of the house. Learning to love yourself is the biggest challenge," she continued.

The actress shared that she goes to a therapist and takes medication for her depression—two things that have helped her feel better.

Between Game of Thrones ending and planning her wedding to fiancé Joe Jonas, Turner may not have the time to take on many new acting roles in the near future. However, we'll continue to see her as Sansa Stark in the final season of Game of Thrones, and as Jean Grey in Dark Phoenix, which hits theaters on June 7.

[h/t: E! News]

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