How Expensive Is Your Drunk Shopping Habit?

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iStock

A night of heavy drinking can lead to more than just nausea and a killer headache the morning afterward. It can also leave you with a credit card bill for some taxidermied alligator head you don't remember buying on Amazon. This is all thanks to tipsy shopping, which, according to a recent survey conducted by the Archstone Recovery Center, may be more expensive than you think.

Drunk Americans may be spending as much as $30 billion annually while shopping online, The Daily Dot reports. A separate survey conducted in February 2018 by the website Finder suggests as many as 46 percent of people have made a purchase while under the influence. Those drunk purchases add up: According to Finder’s research, Americans spend an average of $447.57 per year shopping while buzzed.

Gin is apparently the most dangerous alcohol for your wallet, according to the Archstone Recovery Center. Gin drinkers in Archstone’s survey spent the most on Amazon shopping sprees—an average of $82.40—and they were also likely to splurge on more expensive items (an average of $235.10 for the most expensive purchase). Whiskey drinkers, on the other hand, spend the least amount of money when they’re drunk ($38.84 on average), but they’re right behind gin drinkers in terms of splurging ($204.70 for the priciest Amazon orders).

But who spends more while drunk shopping on Amazon? Women, says Archstone, who spend an average of $45.39 on a drunk shopping spree (men spend an average of $39.87). Men spend more than women on their most expensive splurges, though ($198.27 and $154.81, respectively).

People regret some purchases more than others, Archstone says. Almost 67 percent of people in the survey regretted purchasing cell phones and phone accessories, and 34 percent regretted purchasing books. On the other hand, nobody regretted buying musical instruments, and a full 93 percent said they enjoyed their purchases of pet supplies.

Archstone’s survey wasn’t exactly scientific. According to the center’s methodology report, the study surveyed 1094 people, and the only qualifier for participation was that subjects had to have purchased an item on Amazon while drinking alcohol.

But the results are fascinating, and it’s a good reminder that shopping—like driving, texting, and exercising—is better left for when you’re sober.

[h/t The Daily Dot]

Want to Buy a House? This Is How Many Hours You Need to Work to Afford One in Your State

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iStock.com/jhorrocks

How much people need to work to afford what is perhaps the most iconic aspect of the American dream—their own house—varies drastically from city to city and state to state. Just as real estate values change with ZIP codes, so, too, do income levels. (Not to mention tax rates and the price of common goods.) To see how attainable owning a home in different cities across the U.S. really is, the cost information site HowMuch.net mapped how many hours someone earning the median income in the country’s biggest cities would need to work just to pay the average mortgage.

To crunch the numbers, the site used Census data to figure out the median hourly income for people in the 98 biggest cites in the U.S., based on the idea that everyone is working 40 hours a week. (Which isn’t very realistic, but still provides a rough estimate.) Then, HowMuch.net used data from Zillow on the median housing prices to calculate the median monthly mortgage price in each of those cities, estimating that people typically get a 30-year mortgage.

Here's the breakdown for the country's most expensive metros:

1. New York, New York: 113 hours
2. Los Angeles, California: 112 hours
3. Miami, Florida: 109 hours
4. San Francisco, California: 107 hours
5. Boston, Massachusetts: 95 hours
6. Oakland, California: 83 hours
7. Long Beach, California: 78 hours
8. San Diego, California: 77 hours
9. Santa Ana, California: 74 hours
10. San Jose, California: 74 hours

California is just as expensive as you thought it was, and that applies to more than just L.A. and Silicon Valley. Long Beach and Orange County's Santa Ana make the list, too, as does sunny San Diego. Those cities pale in comparison to Miami and Boston, though. Someone living in Santa Ana would be able to afford the median mortgage working a full 35 fewer hours than someone in Miami—basically a whole workweek. Of course, that seems much less affordable when you consider that someone in Memphis only has to work 18 hours to afford their mortgage, about a fifth of what someone in San Jose does.

Obviously, there are aspects of this data that don't entirely capture the reality on the ground. Many people work more than 40 hours a week. Interest rates can vary a lot based on credit score, when you took out your mortgage, and other factors. Many households have more than one source of income, and those incomes may not be equal, which change the figures quite a bit. Most importantly, this only reflects the cost of housing. While a mortgage payment is a huge chunk of most people's expenses, this graphic doesn't reflect the cost of other necessities like food, insurance, transportation, and all the other things we have to pay for to get by in any given month.

So, before you plan your move to Memphis, bear in mind that these are just rough estimates. That said, if you do want to move to Memphis, we wouldn't blame you.

Game of Thrones Star Emilia Clarke's Impressive Net Worth Revealed

Matt Winkelmeyer, Getty Images
Matt Winkelmeyer, Getty Images

Most people know Emilia Clarke as Daenerys Targaryen, the badass Mother of Dragons on Game of Thrones. Although her role on the HBO hit, which kicked off in 2011, is inarguably what made her a star, she originally made her screen debut back in 2009.

Since then, Clarke has acted in various TV shows and movies (not to mention one memorable commercial for the Samaritans charity), signed endorsement deals, and more. So how much is she actually worth?

According to CheatSheet, the 32-year-old actress has an impressive net worth of $13 million.

Her biggest payday, of course, comes from Game of Thrones, for which she'll earn a salary of $500,000 per episode for the upcoming final season. Although there are only six episodes in the season, she's still making off with a pretty $3 million. Clarke and fellow GOT star Lena Headey (who plays Cersei Lannister) reportedly make the same amount as their male co-stars: Kit Harington, Peter Dinklage, and Nikolaj Coster-Waldau—making them HBO's highest-paid actors.

Clarke's acting career began in the theater during school, and she landed her first TV role in 2009 with one episode of the British series Doctors. She also starred in the 2009 SYFY film Triassic Attack. By 2010, she was cast as Daenerys Targaryen, a role that would eventually earn her three Emmy nominations (and counting).

During her time on Game of Thrones, Clarke has also built up an exciting resume with other projects. In 2015, she played Sarah Connor in Terminator Genisys, and in 2016, she starred in the film Me Before You. Most impressively, she joined the Star Wars franchise, playing Qi'ra in 2018’s Solo: A Star Wars Story. In 2019, she'll team up with Crazy Rich Asians star Henry Golding for Paul Feig's upcoming comedy, Last Christmas.

In addition to leading roles, Clarke has also voiced characters on Futurama and Robot Chicken. She is also currently the face of Dolce & Gabbana's "The One" fragrance.

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