Want to Take Better Care of Your Contacts? The CDC Is Hosting a Facebook Live Discussion with Tips

iStock
iStock

Contact lenses provide wearers the opportunity to see clearly and comfortably. At the same time, they create a risk of eye infection if not handled properly. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) wants contact wearers to start practicing better hygiene, and they'll be hosting an event on the subject through Facebook Live on Monday, August 20.

The Facebook Live talk kicks off Contact Lens Health Week, a collaboration between the CDC and the American Academy of Ophthalmology and American Academy of Optometry. This year's theme is "Healthy Habits Mean Healthy Eyes," and the online panel discussion will focus on the practices contact wearers should follow on a daily basis to protect their eyes—as well as which behaviors to avoid.

Allowing harmful microbes to enter your eyes through your contacts can lead to inflammation and infection, which is uncomfortable at best and threatening to your vision at worst. According to the CDC, you should always make sure to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water before touching your eyes or lenses. Never expose your contacts to any fluids other than your cleaning solution, including water from a shower, pool, or hot tub. And, yes, falling asleep in your contacts really is as bad as your optometrist says it is: At night, your eyes become a more hospitable environment for bacteria, and a contact lens can basically act like a Petri dish.

For more eye hygiene tips, you can tune in to the CDC's Facebook Live event on their page on August 20 at 1 p.m. EDT. Check out our list of deadly sins for contact lens wearers in the meantime.

Fart All You Want—These 'Flatulence Jeans' Were Designed to Absorb the Smell

Shreddies
Shreddies

Like it or not, everyone farts, and they do it far more than you’d think. Healthy people pass gas up to 20 times a day, and, as we recently learned, even if you try to hold your farts in, they’ll come out one way or the other—possibly through your mouth. Depending on what you eat and where you pass it, that can get pretty smelly. That is, unless you’re wearing fart-proof pants. A UK-based company called Shreddies makes “flatulence filtering” jeans that promise to eliminate your worst smells before they can escape into the wider world, Business Today reports.

Shreddies products are lined with activated charcoal, a substance that’s great at absorbing odors and gases—so much so that it’s a go-to ingredient for home air filters and purifiers. According to Shreddies, the odor-absorbing qualities of the fabric last around two to three years, at which point you’d probably be buying new jeans, anyway.

A side view of a woman wearing fart-filtering underwear
Shreddies

You still have to mind your farts, though. The company says that to be effective, the jeans have to fit tightly against the skin, ensuring that your gas is absorbed directly into the fabric. “To avoid flatulence escaping around the filter we recommend that you stand with your legs together and try to let your wind out slowly,” the Shreddies website instructs (emphasis theirs). “When sitting, keep your knees together so that flatulence escapes through the carbon panel.” As long as the jeans fit correctly, the filter should absorb all the foul odors leaking out of your body.

The jeans, available for men and women, cost roughly $130 (£100) plus shipping, a price that probably seems worth it to the people in your life who have to deal with your noxious toots.

Not a jeans person? Fear not. The company also makes fart-filtering underwear and pajamas. There are gift options, too, for all of your favorite flatulence-prone friends.

[h/t Business Today]

How Microwaving Food Affects Its Nutritional Value

iStock/grzymkiewicz
iStock/grzymkiewicz

There’s probably no household appliance that sees more use than a microwave. For people who don’t have the time or inclination to prepare dinners from scratch or heat meals in a conventional oven, zapping food has become the ultimate method of time management in the kitchen.

Some people harbor the belief that a price has to be paid for that convenience—specifically, that food loses nutritional value by being subjected to a quick nuking.

The truth? Microwaving doesn’t harm a food’s nutrients. In fact, it may preserve them more than some slow-cook methods do.

The reason is found in how microwaves work. The appliances heat food by blasting it with waves of energy not unlike radio waves. These waves target water and other molecules in the food. Thermal energy quickly builds up, and dishes come out heated in a relatively short period of time. This process avoids two of the factors that can lead to nutrient loss: cooking duration and high temperatures. Typically, the longer and hotter food is cooked, the more its nutritional value dissipates.

The other advantage is that microwaves don’t require water for heating. If you boil broccoli, for example, the hot water allows nutrients to leach out of the vegetable. (While that makes for a good stock, your broccoli may be robbed of some of its healthy benefits.) A quick steam in the microwave leaves broccoli relatively intact.

That’s not to say that microwave cooking is superior to a stovetop. Cooking foods at reasonable temperatures and durations shouldn’t result in significant nutrient loss, though some is inevitable for any manner of cooking. But microwaving isn’t going to erase nutrients via some mysterious microwave alchemy, either.

[h/t CNN]

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