How to Make Homemade Fortune Cookies

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iStock

It takes about 30 seconds to rip apart and devour a fortune cookie (after reading the prescient message inside, of course), but making them by hand is a time-consuming process. While most of the fortune cookies served at Chinese restaurants in the U.S. are mass-produced, homemade cookies with personalized messages stuffed inside make great gifts and impressive party favors. Perhaps most importantly, they taste better, too.

Tammy, a Canadian cook behind the YouTube channel Yoyomax12 - The Diet-Free Zone, has broken down the process into a few simple steps. First, the batter is prepared by combining egg whites, vanilla extract, almond extract, vegetable oil, flour, corn starch, salt, sugar, and water in a bowl. Other recipes call for lemon or orange zest and melted butter to enhance the flavor.

Once the batter is well-mixed, two dabs are scooped onto a greased cookie sheet, and a spoon is used to spread it out. The batter is then baked for 11 to 12 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit until the edges are lightly browned.

The next step is when things start to get tricky. The cookies are soft and malleable when they first come out of the oven, but they quickly harden, so time is of the essence. As Tammy demonstrates, one of the cookies is picked up—they’re hot, so gloves are recommended!—and a paper fortune is placed in the middle. It's then folded in half, and the folded edge is lightly pressed against the rim of a mug to fold it one more time, giving the cookie its distinctive shape. After doing the same with the other cookie, the entire process is repeated by baking more batter.

Tammy suggests that beginners start with just two cookies at a time until they get the hang of it. “You have to fold the cookies when they’re still warm,” Tammy says. “If you fold them when they’re cool, they crack and they break into pieces because they get very brittle.”

Of course, fortune cookie companies use an assembly line to expedite the process. Machines take care of the mixing, baking, and folding, and videos of that process are available online (including one featuring Jimmy Kimmel). One manufacturer reportedly churns out 4 million fortune cookies per day.

Interestingly, although the Pacman-shaped cookies are a staple at Chinese restaurants, their heritage is largely American. Some have traced the confection's origins back to early 20th-century California, while other researchers have said its shape is uncannily similar to fortune cookies served in Japan decades before they popped up in the U.S.

Ready to try it out for yourself? It may take a bit of practice to get it right, but take some advice from a fortune cookie: “All things are difficult before they are easy.”

Why is Winnie the Pooh Called a Pooh?

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iStock.com/CatLane

Since A.A. Milne published the first official Winnie the Pooh story in 1926, the character has become beloved by children across many generations. Milne’s writing clearly struck a chord, and the character’s many subsequent TV and film adaptations have endeared him to an even wider audience.

But why is Winnie called a Pooh rather than a bear? Given that most children (and grown-ups, for that matter) have a different idea of what a Pooh is, how has the name stuck?

The answer lies back in the 1920s.

In fact, when first introduced by Milne, Winnie wasn’t even Winnie. Initially, he went by the name of Edward Bear, before changing to Winnie in time for that aforementioned official 1926 debut. The "Winnie" part of the name came from a visit to the London Zoo, where Milne saw a black bear who had been named after the city of Winnipeg, Canada.

As for Pooh? Well, originally Pooh was a swan, a different character entirely.

In the book When We Were Very Young (the same book that introduced Edward Bear), Milne wrote a poem, telling how Christopher Robin would feed the swan in the mornings.

He told how Christopher Robin had given the swan the name "Pooh," explaining that “this is a very fine name for a swan, because if you call him and he doesn’t come (which is a thing swans are good at), then you can pretend that you were just saying ‘Pooh!’ to show him how little you wanted him."

Milne indeed knew what he was doing by using such a word. The names "Winnie" and "Pooh" were soon brought together, and Winnie the Pooh was born. Milne still took a little time out to explain why Winnie was a Pooh, though.

As he would write in the first chapter of the first Winnie the Pooh book, “But his arms were so stiff ... they stayed up straight in the air for more than a week, and whenever a fly came and settled on his nose he had to blow it off. And I think—but I am not sure—that that is why he is always called Pooh."

It's not the most convincing explanation, but it's a formal explanation nonetheless.

Not that the reasoning ultimately mattered too much. The name stuck, having never seen a focus group in its life. A much loved childhood character, with a vaguely funny name, would go on to superstardom. And even be honored with his own holiday, Winnie the Pooh Day, which occurs annually on January 18th.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

Why is Winnie the Pooh Called a Pooh?

iStock.com/CatLane
iStock.com/CatLane

Since A.A. Milne published the first official Winnie the Pooh story in 1926, the character has become beloved by children across many generations. Milne’s writing clearly struck a chord, and the character’s many subsequent TV and film adaptations have endeared him to an even wider audience.

But why is Winnie called a Pooh rather than a bear? Given that most children (and grown-ups, for that matter) have a different idea of what a Pooh is, how has the name stuck?

The answer lies back in the 1920s.

In fact, when first introduced by Milne, Winnie wasn’t even Winnie. Initially, he went by the name of Edward Bear, before changing to Winnie in time for that aforementioned official 1926 debut. The "Winnie" part of the name came from a visit to the London Zoo, where Milne saw a black bear who had been named after the city of Winnipeg, Canada.

As for Pooh? Well, originally Pooh was a swan, a different character entirely.

In the book When We Were Very Young (the same book that introduced Edward Bear), Milne wrote a poem, telling how Christopher Robin would feed the swan in the mornings.

He told how Christopher Robin had given the swan the name "Pooh," explaining that “this is a very fine name for a swan, because if you call him and he doesn’t come (which is a thing swans are good at), then you can pretend that you were just saying ‘Pooh!’ to show him how little you wanted him."

Milne indeed knew what he was doing by using such a word. The names "Winnie" and "Pooh" were soon brought together, and Winnie the Pooh was born. Milne still took a little time out to explain why Winnie was a Pooh, though.

As he would write in the first chapter of the first Winnie the Pooh book, “But his arms were so stiff ... they stayed up straight in the air for more than a week, and whenever a fly came and settled on his nose he had to blow it off. And I think—but I am not sure—that that is why he is always called Pooh."

It's not the most convincing explanation, but it's a formal explanation nonetheless.

Not that the reasoning ultimately mattered too much. The name stuck, having never seen a focus group in its life. A much loved childhood character, with a vaguely funny name, would go on to superstardom. And even be honored with his own holiday, Winnie the Pooh Day, which occurs annually on January 18th.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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