Very Polite Canadian Belugas Have Made Friends With a Lone Narwhal

Baleines En Direct, YouTube
Baleines En Direct, YouTube

It’s hard to resist the cute factor of cross-species friendship. And so it’s with great joy that we report that Canada’s beluga whales appear to be just as polite as the rest of their countrymen when it comes to making friends with other species. One pod of belugas seems to have adopted a stray narwhal, according to the CBC.

The narwhal, captured in drone footage taken by researchers from the Canadian marine conservation nonprofit GREMM, has been spotted three years in a row swimming closely with a pod of young, mostly male beluga whales in the St. Lawrence estuary in Québec. The narwhal seems to exhibit beluga behaviors like blowing bubbles, and acts playful with the rest of the group. The same whale was spotted swimming with belugas in the area in 2016 and 2017, according to photo comparisons.

The sighting is notable because it took place more than 600 miles south of normal narwhal territory. The Arctic whales typically don’t venture farther south than Ungava Bay, located at the northern edge of Québec east of Hudson Bay.

In a post on GREMM’s site Whales Online, the researchers behind the footage speculate that climate change might make these sights more regular. The beluga and the narwhal both belong to the same cetacean family, Monodontidae, and as the waters in the Arctic warm, the two species’ territories might start to overlap more frequently. This could eventually lead to whale hybrids, even, similar to how shrinking sea ice has brought polar bears and grizzlies together more often, leading to interbreeding. This narwhal may have strayed far from his normal territory, losing track of his own kind before taking up with this band of friendly young whales.

[h/t CBC]

The 10 Most Popular Cat Names of 2018

iStock/101cats
iStock/101cats

We’ve never met your cat, but we know for a fact that he or she is one-of-a-kind. What might not be so unique? Your little ball o’ fluff’s name ... especially if it’s Luna.

Banfield Pet Hospital, the world’s largest general veterinary, mined its database of more than 500,000 feline patients to see which monikers experienced an uptick in popularity in 2018. As was the case in 2017, Luna topped the list of most popular cat names (while the far-less-innovative Kitty came in third).

Pop culture continues to be a big inspiration when it comes to cat names. Though the This is Us-themed names Jack and Milo dropped in popularity between 2017 and 2018, they both still managed to crack the top 20, while Lando saw a 31 percent increase in popularity thanks to Solo: A Star Wars Story.

Here are the 10 most popular cat names of 2018. Did your kitty’s make the cut?

1. Luna

2. Bella

3. Kitty

4. Oliver

5. Lucy

6. Charlie

7. Shadow

8. Max

9. Leo

10. Milo

12 Old-Timey Turkey Terms to Bring Back This Thanksgiving

iStock.com/westernphotographs
iStock.com/westernphotographs

Want to spice up conversation this Thanksgiving? Use these terms while you’re talking turkey.

1. RUM COBBLE-COLTER

According to A new dictionary of the terms ancient and modern of the canting crew, in its several tribes, of Gypsies, beggers, thieves, cheats, &c., with an addition of some proverbs, phrases, figurative speeches, &c., first published in the late 1600s, a cobble-colter is a turkey. A rum cobble-colter, on the other hand, is "a fat large cock-turkey."

2. I GUESS IT’S ALL TURKEY

This American phrase is “a quaint saying indicating that all is equally good.”

3. AND 4. BUBBLY-JOCK AND BOBBLE-COCK

Bubbly-jock is Scottish slang for a male turkey, from the noise the bird makes. The term can also be used to describe “a stupid, boasting person.” Both usages might apply at your Thanksgiving dinner. Slang for a turkey in northern England, meanwhile, is bobble-cock, according to The Slang Dictionary: Or, The Vulgar Words, Street Phrases, and "Fast Expressions” of High and Low Society, published in 1864.

5. TURKEY MERCHANTS

According to 1884’s The Slang Dictionary: Etymological, Historical, and Anecdotal, this was a term for “dealers in plundered or contraband silk.” Previously, it referred to something more obvious: “a driver of turkeys and geese to market.”

6. ALDERMAN

A “well-stuffedturkey. An alderman in chains is a turkey with sausages; according to A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, published in 1788, the sausages “are supposed to represent the gold chain worn by those magistrates.”

7. COLD TURKEY RAP

According to Eric Partridge's A Dictionary of the Underworld: British and American, this 1928 term means "an accusation, a charge, against a person caught in the act." Perhaps you'll get a cold turkey rap for stealing seconds—or thirds—of your favorite dish this holiday.

8. BLOCK ISLAND TURKEY

An American slang term for salted cod, originating in Connecticut and Rhode Island.

9. TURKEY PUDDLE

Eighteenth-century slang for coffee.

10. SNOTERGOB

According to A Dictionary of the Scottish Language, snotergob is “the red part of a turkey’s head.”

11. RED AS A TURKEY COCK

This phrase dates back to 1630, according to Dictionary of Proverbs. It could refer to any kind of flushing of the face (including, perhaps, when your dad and your uncle are getting too worked up debating politics).

12. TO HAVE A TURKEY ON ONE’S BACK

According to the 1905 book A Dictionary of Slang and Colloquial English, this is what you say when someone has imbibed a bit too much: It means “to be drunk.”

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