15 Killer Facts About Kill Bill: Vol. 1

Andrew Cooper, Miramax Films
Andrew Cooper, Miramax Films

Even by Quentin Tarantino’s standards, Kill Bill was a surprise. He’d made a name for himself with a slew of curse words, violence toward ears, and riffs on sleazy genres, but the story of The Bride seeking revenge on the Deadly Viper Assassination Squad was an epic. A movie that couldn’t be contained in one easy piece, it had to be split up into two still-large parts that paid homage to a fistful of genres.

It’s been 15 years since we met The Bride in the first installment. Looking back, there’s an elegant simplicity to how Uma Thurman crafted a character dead-set on killing everyone who left her to die in a creaky church in El Paso, Texas. She had a goal, and she went after it. No sweeping life lessons about the corruption of vengeance—just a question of whether she had the grit and skill to carry it out. To celebrate the film's 15th anniversary, here are 15 things you might not know about Kill Bill: Vol 1.

1. THEY REALLY SLICED A BASEBALL IN HALF.

During the scene where The Bride gets the sword from Hattori Hanzo, he throws a baseball at her which she cuts in two. They didn’t fake it—though it was Thurman’s stunt double, Zoë Bell, who actually did it.

2. O-REN ISHII’S GENERIC THREAT CAME TRUE.

Before O-Ren Ishii fights The Bride, she mocks her in Japanese by saying, “Hope you’ve saved your energy. If you haven’t, you might not last five minutes.” Four minutes and 59 seconds after O-Ren steps forward to start the fight, she gets part of her head cut off. Turns out The Bride didn’t need to last that long.

3. THE BRIDE’S NAME IS HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT.

If you look fast or pause the movie, you don't need to wait until the movie's second installment to learn The Bride's name. Thurman’s character goes by a series of code names throughout the first installment, and her real name is bleeped to keep us from knowing it, but it’s printed clearly on her plane ticket to Tokyo (and Bill calls her “Kiddo,” which turns out not to be a nickname).

4. THE BRIDE’S YELLOW JUMPSUIT IS AN HOMAGE TO BRUCE LEE.

Uma Thurman in 'Kill Bill: Vol. 1' (2003)
Andrew Cooper, Miramax Films

As a nice sartorial tribute, The Bride wears a killer outfit meant to mimic the iconic ensemble Bruce Lee wore in Game of Death. Tarantino also copied a short headlock sequence from Game of Death during The Bride’s fight with Vernita Green (Vivica A. Fox).

5. QUENTIN TARANTINO PUT THE MOVIE ON HOLD WHEN UMA THURMAN GOT PREGNANT.

Tarantino and Thurman conceived of The Bride together while shooting Pulp Fiction, so there was only ever one actress to play the role. Then, Thurman got pregnant, so the long-gestating idea got put on hold again. “She got pregnant, and I was like, 'Okay, do I wait or do I not?' But I can honestly tell you that I didn’t have a choice,” Tarantino told the BBC. “Yes, this is my samurai movie; yes, this is my badass chick movie; yes, this is my spaghetti western and my comic book movie. But it’s also my Josef Von Sternberg movie, and if Josef Von Sternberg is getting ready to make Morocco and Marlene Dietrich gets pregnant, he waits for Dietrich!”

6. USING BLACK AND WHITE FOR THE CRAZY 88 FIGHT WAS A PRACTICAL HOMAGE.

The film shifts from color to black and white when The Bride battles the Yakuza in the House of Blue Leaves, which is a nod toward kung fu movies shown on TV in the 1970s, but it wasn’t just an artistic choice. Those movies were broadcast in black and white to get around the censors, and that’s exactly what Tarantino did, too. To avoid an NC-17 rating, and to avoid cutting out any of the over-the-top violence of the scene, he shot it in black and white.

7. THERE’S NO BLOOD IN THE TRAILER.

As the bastion of general audience innocence, the MPAA won’t allow “blood or open wounds” in green band trailers, so Kill Bill: Vol. 1’s advertisements make it look like The Bride was stabbing a barrel of motor oil with a samurai sword and got some on her jumpsuit. I’m pretty sure the people most excited about fictional bloodshed got the message.

8. THERE’S A REASON HANZO SET UP SHOP IN OKINAWA.

Hattori Hanzo leaving his life as a swordsmith behind and opening up a sushi bar specifically in Okinawa is a bit of an inside joke. Okinawa has a reputation in Japan for not having great sushi (they love pork, though) so it’s suggested in the film that an Okinawan sushi bar is the perfect place for Hanzo to hide from his old life. Not to mention the shared love of perfection, craftsmanship, and knives.

9. THEY USED CONDOMS FOR THE BLOOD EFFECTS.

Just like many Chinese action flicks of the 1970s, Tarantino and company used fake-blood-filled condoms to create the bursts of blood you see on screen. He was also particular about the blood recipe. “You can’t pour this raspberry pancake syrup on a sword and have it look good,” he said.

10. TARANTINO ASKED THURMAN TO WATCH THREE MOVIES TO PREPARE.

Those three movies were: John Woo’s The Killer; Jack Hill's Coffy, starring future Jackie Brown star Pam Grier; and Sergio Leone's timeless western A Fistful of Dollars. That blend also captures the exact balance of the genres Tarantino celebrated in the script. He and Thurman also first crafted The Bride after talking about Coffy on the set of Pulp Fiction.

11. THURMAN GOT SERIOUSLY INJURED DOING A CAR STUNT.

It only came out recently that Tarantino coerced Thurman into driving a rickety blue Karmann Ghia for a pivotal scene that he demanded be done without green screen or CGI. The production knew the car was unsafe and required a stunt professional, but Thurman eventually relented, crashed the car into a tree, and injured her back and knees. Tarantino apologized publicly, and she’s since forgiven him.

12. O-REN WAS ORIGINALLY MEANT TO GET BEHEADED.

The Bride fatally wounds O-Ren during their fight by slicing off part of her head, but she was originally supposed to cut her head off completely. The problem with that? With her head gone, O-Ren wouldn’t have recognized that The Bride wasn’t lying about having a genuine Hattori Hanzo sword.

13. O-REN IS THE ONLY ONE WHO DIES BY THE SWORD.

The movie places a great deal of importance on The Bride getting the Hattori Hanzo sword to use it in her revenge, but O-Ren is the only one who sees the wrong end of the blade. In the second installment of the movie, The Bride plucks Elle’s eye out and uses the Five Point Palm Exploding Heart Technique on Bill.

14. THE BRIDE WASN’T SUPPOSED TO SPARE ANY OF THE CRAZY 88.

Tarantino is meticulous about his scripts, but he’s also wide open to changing things during shoots. That includes the character played by 17-year-old Hu Xiaokui, whose innocent face spared his life, turning him into a witness and figure of The Bride’s (limited) sympathy.

“I thought, ‘There’s no way she’d off a kid with a mug like this,'" Tarantino told TIME Magazine. So, she leaves one alive after the blood bath.

15. BUCK’S CAR IS UNCENSORED ON TV.

Buck the hospital orderly’s infamous “P*ssy Wagon” gets changed to “Party Wagon” in dialogue when the movie plays on network TV (how much of it can even be on TV?), but the networks either didn’t see a need or didn’t want to pay to have the car’s license plate changed digitally. It still reads “PSY WGN.”

8 Sequels That Received Oscar Nominations for Best Picture

Jasin Boland, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.
Jasin Boland, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

It’s rare when a movie sequel manages to stand up to the original entry in a film series. Even rarer? When a sequel is so good that it nabs an Oscars nomination for Best Picture. Here are eight movies that did just that.

1. Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)

When Mad Max: Fury Road was released in theaters in 2015, no one thought that it would be a critical darling—or an awards contender . But when the Academy Award nominations were announced in 2016, the latest entry in George Miller’s Mad Max franchise earned a whopping 10 nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director. Fury Road is the fourth installment in the series and was the first to hit theaters in 30 years (since the release of 1985’s Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome). It’s also the first movie in the franchise to receive any recognition from the Academy.

2. Toy Story 3 (2010)

A still from 'Toy Story 3' (2010)
Disney/Pixar

In 2011, Toy Story 3 was nominated for five Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Animated Feature. Though The King’s Speech ended up taking the night’s top prize, Toy Story 3 (which was named Best Animated Feature) made history that night, as it was the third ever animated movie to score a Best Picture nod; 1991’s Beauty and the Beast and 2009’s Up are the other two films to earn the same accolade.

3. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

Although the first two installments in The Lord of the Rings trilogy—2001’s The Fellowship of the Ring and 2002’s The Two Towers—were each nominated for Best Picture, it was the final movie that ended up winning the Academy Award in 2004. In fact, The Return of the King won 11 Oscars that year, sweeping every category in which it was nominated, and tying Ben-Hur and Titanic for the most awards received in one night.

4. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002)

In 2003, The Two Towers won two of the six Oscars for which it was nominated, for Best Sound Editing and Best Visual Effects. Rob Marshall’s musical Chicago beat it out for Best Picture.  

5. The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter in 'The Silence of the Lambs' (1991)
20th Century Fox Home Entertainment

In 1992, The Silence of the Lambs made a clean sweep of the “Big Five” categories: Best Picture, Best Director for Jonathan Demme, Best Actor for Sir Anthony Hopkins, Best Actress for Jodie Foster, and Best Adapted Screenplay for Ted Tally. Although The Silence of the Lambs isn’t a direct sequel to Michael Mann’s 1986 film Manhunter, it’s based on the sequel novel to author Thomas Harris’s Red Dragon, on which Manhunter was based. It also features the character Hannibal Lecter in a major role, who was played by Brian Cox in Manhunter—before Hopkins made the role his own. Got that?

6. The Godfather: Part III (1990)

Though it’s often considered the far inferior film in The Godfather trilogy, The Godfather: Part III received seven Academy Award nominations in 1991, including Best Picture and Best Director for Francis Ford Coppola. Ultimately, it lost to Kevin Costner’s Dances with Wolves, making it the only installment in The Godfather Saga not to win a Best Picture Oscar.

7. The Godfather: Part II (1974)

Al Pacino in 'The Godfather: Part II' (1974)
Paramount Pictures

In 1975, The Godfather: Part II became the first sequel in Oscar history to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. It won the coveted award two years after the original film was named Best Picture. The sequel was nominated for a total of 11 Oscars, with three separate nominations in the Best Supporting Actor category alone: one for Michael Vincenzo Gazzo (who played Frankie Pentangeli) and Lee Strasberg (as Hyman Roth), and one for Robert De Niro, who took home the statuette for playing the younger version of Vito Corleone.

8. The Bells of St. Mary's (1945)

Though it lost Best Picture to Billy Wilder’s The Lost Weekend at the 1946 Oscars, The Bells of St. Mary’s is the first movie sequel to be nominated for the Academy’s biggest prize. The film is a sequel to Leo McCarey’s previous film, 1944’s Going My Way, which won the Oscar for Best Picture a year earlier. While Going My Way and The Bells of St. Mary’s feature different stories and casts, Bing Crosby stars in both movies as Father Chuck O'Malley.

An earlier version of this article ran in 2016.

James Cameron Directed Entourage's Aquaman, But He Could Never Direct the Real One

Tommaso Boddi, Getty Images for AMC
Tommaso Boddi, Getty Images for AMC

Oscar-winning director James Cameron is no stranger to CGI. With movies like Avatar under his belt, you’d expect Cameron to find a particular sort of enjoyment in special effects-heavy movies like James Wan's Aquaman. But Cameron—who directed the fictional version of Aquaman featuring fictional movie star Vinnie Chase in the very real HBO series Entourage—has a little trouble with suspension of disbelief.

In a recent interview with Yahoo!, Cameron said that while he did enjoy Aquaman, he would never have been able to direct the movie itself because of its lack of realism.

"I think it’s great fun,” Cameron said. “I never could have made that film, because it requires this kind of total dreamlike disconnection from any sense of physics or reality. People just kind of zoom around underwater, because they propel themselves mentally, I guess, I don’t know. But it’s cool! You buy it on its own terms.”

"I’ve spent thousands of hours underwater," the Titanic director went on to say. "While I can enjoy that film, I don’t resonate with it because it doesn’t look real.”

While Aquaman was shot on a soundstage, Cameron will be employing state-of-the-art technology that will allow him to actually be underwater while shooting underwater scenes for his upcoming Avatar sequels.

[h/t Yahoo!]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER