CrunchCup: This Innovative Travel Mug Makes Sure Your Cereal Never Gets Soggy

CrunchCup, Kickstarter
CrunchCup, Kickstarter

You can always pour your coffee into a to-go cup on mornings when you've overslept, but milk and Cheerios don't travel quite as well. A new invention raising money on Kickstarter seeks to change that: The CrunchCup makes it possible to enjoy a one-handed breakfast on the go while keeping your cereal fresh and crunchy at the same time.

What sets CrunchCup apart from regular travel mugs is its dual-chambered design. The large, outer compartment is meant to hold a serving of milk to go with your cereal. Once that chamber's been filled, screw in the inner chamber and lid and pour your favorite breakfast cereal through the hole on top. This system keeps the milk and cereal separate until you're ready to take a bite/sip.

Unlike eating cereal from a bowl, using the CrunchCup means your cereal will never get soggy—no matter how long your morning commute is. And each component is dishwasher-friendly, so cleaning it once you've finally reached your destination isn't a hassle.

The product's Kickstarter campaign has already exceeded its $18,000 goal, and 5 percent of all proceeds will be donated to a "national charitable organization that is dedicated to feeding children in need." To reserve a CrunchCup of your own, you can pledge $25 or more to the project, with delivery estimated for April 2019.

Canned Pumpkin Isn’t Actually Pumpkin

iStock
iStock

We hate to squash your autumnal dreams, but baking a pumpkin pie might not be as easy as you think. That’s because the canned pumpkin that normally makes pie prep such a breeze isn’t made of pumpkin at all. Food & Wine reports that cans of pumpkin puree—even those that advertise "100 percent pumpkin"—are actually made of a range of different squashes.

Most pumpkin purees are a mix of winter squashes, including butternut squash, Golden Delicious, and Hubbard. Meanwhile, Libby’s, the largest pumpkin puree brand, has developed its own unique brand of squash called the Dickinson, which is more closely related to a butternut squash than a pumpkin. The FDA is vague about what counts as "pumpkin," which allows companies to pack unspecified squashes into their purees and still list pumpkin as the sole ingredient.

While it’s a little unsettling to find out your favorite pie is not what it seems, pumpkin puree brands have a good reason for their deception. While pumpkins are a quintessential part of autumn, they don’t actually taste that great. Most pumpkins are watery and a little bit stringy, and turning them into a puree takes more work, and involves less reward, than other, sweeter winter squashes.

[h/t Food & Wine]

What's the Difference Between Stuffing and Dressing?

iStock
iStock

For carbohydrate lovers, nothing completes a Thanksgiving meal quite like stuffing—shovelfuls of bread, celery, mushrooms, and other ingredients that complement all of that turkey protein.

Some people don’t say stuffing, though. They say dressing. In these calamitous times, knowing how to properly refer to the giant glob of insulin-spiking bread seems necessary. So what's the difference?

Let’s dismiss one theory off the bat: Dressing and stuffing do not correlate with how the side dish is prepared. A turkey can be stuffed with dressing, and stuffing can be served in a casserole dish. Whether it’s ever seen the inside of a bird is irrelevant, and anyone who tells you otherwise is wrong and should be met with suspicion, if not outright derision.

The terms are actually separated due to regional dialects. Dressing seems to be the favored descriptor for southern states like Mississippi, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Georgia, while stuffing is preferred by Maine, New York, and other northern areas. (Some parts of Pennsylvania call it filling, which is a bit too on the nose, but to each their own.)

If stuffing stemmed from the common practice of filling a turkey with carbs, why the division? According to The Huffington Post, it may have been because Southerners considered the word stuffing impolite, and therefore never embraced it.

While you should experience no material difference in asking for stuffing or dressing, when visiting relatives it might be helpful to keep to their regionally-preferred word to avoid confusion. Enjoy stuffing yourselves.

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