13 Fun Facts About Wawa

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iStock

In 2015, a study confirmed what many convenience store shoppers already knew: Wawa is the best. Seven thousand consumers, polled by Market Force, gave Wawa a "composite loyalty score" of 68 percent, ahead of other stores like QuikTrip (62 percent) and Sheetz (59 percent), and it also nabbed the top spot in the fresh food category. In celebration of Wawa Day, here are some things you might not have known about the absolute best place on earth to buy a hoagie, iced tea, and Tastykakes.

1. IT WAS FOUNDED MORE THAN 200 YEARS AGO, AS AN IRON FACTORY.

Though the first Wawa store was opened in 1964, the company actually has more than 200 years of history: It began in 1803 as a New Jersey iron factory and was incorporated in 1865 as the Millville Manufacturing Company. Then, in 1902, Millville's owner George Wood opened up a milk processing plant in Wawa, Pennsylvania. (The cows for the plant came from the English Channel island of Guernsey.)

2. "DOCTOR CERTIFIED" MILK WAS A KEY TO ITS EARLY SUCCESS.

In the early 1900s, many children were becoming sick from drinking raw milk, so Wood had doctors vouch for his product. The "doctor certified" milk, delivered directly to a customer's home, made the business a huge success.

3. THE VERY FIRST WAWA STORE IS STILL OPEN.

As the milk delivery business dwindled in the 1960s, Wood's grandson, Grahame, noticed that customers were shopping more at supermarkets, and thought Wawa could distribute its products that way. The first Wawa Food Market opened at 1212 MacDade Boulevard in Folsom, Pennsylvania, on April 16, 1964—and it's still there!


Photo courtesy of Wawa

4. BEING ALLOWED TO REMAIN OPEN ON SUNDAYS HELPED BUSINESS BOOM.

The stores were successful in part because convenience stores were exempt from laws that kept other stores closed on Sundays.

5. BUSINESS GREW QUICKLY.

By 1972, there were 100 Wawa stores open for business. By 1992, there were 500 stores. Today, there are more than 750 Wawa stores.

6. IT'S AN OJIBWE WORD.

Wawa is Ojibwe for Canada Goose.

7. YOU MIGHT NOT BE PRONOUNCING IT CORRECTLY.

Want to pronounce "Wawa" correctly? It rhymes with Saw Saw, according to locals.

8. THEY SELL A LOT OF HOAGIES.

Wawa's stores—located in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and Florida—sell more than 60 million made-to-order hoagies annually.

9. COFFEE IS HOT, TOO.

Wawa sells enough coffee—195 million cups—to fill Shamu's tank more than 11 times. That signature coffee, introduced in the 1970s, is proprietary, and available only in Wawa stores.

10. THERE'S A WAWA UNIVERSITY.

Some Wawa employees attend Wawa University, which, according to the company, "will guide you with comprehensive training courses and continuing educational programs. On-site, off-site. On the job, in the virtual and traditional classroom. The goal is always to meet your evolving training and education needs. From Brand Fundamentals to Leadership Development to Career Enhancement, you'll have the chance to strengthen your career potential and achieve your goals."

11. THEIR SLOGAN HAS CHANGED A NUMBER OF TIMES.

These days, Wawa's slogan is "Gottahava Wawa," but past slogans include "Mama I Luv Wawa," "People on the Go, Go to Wawa," "My Choice, My Wawa," and "We Do it Better." 


Image courtesy of Wawa

 

12. PEOPLE LOVE THEIR WAWA.

People love their Wawa. In 2009, five West Chester women completed a two-year quest to visit every Wawa then in existence. The New York Times Magazine asked if the chain was a "Convenience Cult." And Jackass star Johnny Knoxville has a Wawa tattoo, which he got thanks to "whiskey and adrenaline."

13. WAWA, PENNSYLVANIA IS LOCATED IN TWO PLACES AT ONCE.

Half of the town of Wawa, Pennsylvania is in Middletown, and half of it is in Chester Heights, the official location of the company's headquarters. According to a 1989 Philadelphia Inquirer article, "Estimates of those who do live in Wawa range from about five families ... to 265 families. ... 'No one's ever drawn a line on a map saying this is where Wawa begins and ends,' explained W. Bruce Clark, Middletown's manager."

5 Fast Facts About Muhammad Ali

Kent Gavin/Getty Images
Kent Gavin/Getty Images

Muhammad Ali is one of the most important athletes and cultural figures in American history. Though he passed away in 2016, the heavyweight boxing champ was larger than life in and outside of the ring. The man who coined the phrase "float like a butterfly, sting like a bee” won 37 knockout victories. Here are five more fast facts about Muhammad Ali, a.k.a. The Greatest.

1. Cassius Clay was named for a white abolitionist.

Muhammad Ali was born Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. and named after his father, who had in turn been named for a white abolitionist. The original Cassius Clay was a wealthy 19th-century planter and politician who not only published an anti-slavery newspaper, but also emancipated every slave he inherited from his father. Cassius Clay also served as a minister to Russia under President Abraham Lincoln.

2. Muhammad Ali's draft evasion case went to the Supreme Court.

In the early 1960s, Clay converted to Islam, joined the Nation of Islam, and took the name Muhammad Ali. According to his religious beliefs, Ali refused to serve in the Vietnam War when he was drafted in April 1967. He was arrested and stripped of his boxing license and heavyweight title. On June 20, 1967, he was convicted of draft evasion and banned from fighting while he remained free on appeal. His case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which unanimously overturned his conviction in 1971.

3. He received a replacement gold medal.

At the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, Ali won the gold medal for boxing in the light heavyweight division. But, as he wrote in his 1975 autobiography, The Greatest: My Own Story (edited by Toni Morrison!), he supposedly threw his medal into the Ohio River in frustration over the racism he still experienced in his hometown of Louisville, Kentucky. Some historians dispute this story and suggest that Ali just lost the medal. Either way, he was given a replacement when he lit the Olympic cauldron at the opening ceremonies of the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

4. Muhammad Ali was an actual superhero.

In 1978, DC Comics published Superman vs. Muhammad Ali—an oversize comic in which Muhammad Ali defeats Superman and saves the world. In real life, Ali did save a man from suicide. In 1981, a man threatened to jump from the ninth story of a building in L.A.’s Miracle Mile neighborhood. Ali’s friend Howard Bingham witnessed the unfolding drama and called the boxer, who lived nearby. Ali rushed into the building and successfully talked the man down from the ledge.

5. Muhammad Ali starred in a Broadway show.

In Oscar Brown, Jr.'s 1969 musical adaptation of Joseph Dolan Tuotti's play Big Time Buck White, Ali played a militant black intellectual who speaks at a political meeting. The play ran for only five nights at the George Abbot Theatre in New York. His Playbill bio reported that Ali "is now appealing his five-year prison conviction and $10,000 fine for refusing to enter the armed services on religious grounds. The Big Time Buck White role that he has accepted is much like the life he lives off stage in reality.”

15 Tasty Bits of Pizza Slang

iStock.com/Radionphoto
iStock.com/Radionphoto

Unless you’ve worked in a pizzeria, your pizza vocabulary is probably limited. But the crust-loving pros who are cooking up your favorite slices seem to have insider slang for everything, including whimsical terms for toppings and one-of-a-kind ways of describing regional pie styles. So if you’re looking up your pizza-talk game with words that go beyond ‘za, here’s a quick list of 15 terms you should know.

1. Tip sag

The dreaded tip sag is what you get when the pointy end of your pizza starts to droop. This most often occurs with top-heavy (and topping-heavy) pies, like Neapolitan-style pizzas with generous helpings of fresh mozzarella piled on top.

2. Avalanche

An avalanche is what occurs when all the toppings slide off your pizza as soon as you pick it up. This tends to happen when a pizza is still piping hot from the oven, so be smart and give it a minute to cool down.

3. Apizza

If you ever travel to New Haven, Connecticut, you might hear the locals order apizza (pronounced uh-BEETS). This refers to the local style of thin-crust pizza, which originated at the famous Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and has since become the area's pizza standard.

4. Grandma pie

This style of pizza is thick like a Sicilian pie, but with a thinner, denser crust. Although it likely originated in Long Island, you can now find it in pizzerias throughout New York City (and beyond).

5. Party-cut

Man delivers several pizzas to a customer
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Also known as a tavern-cut, a party-cut describes any circular pizza that’s cut into a grid. The portions are smaller and typically square, which helps ensure that everyone at your Super Bowl party will get a piece of the pie.

6. All-dressed pizza

Order an all-dressed pizza in Montreal and you’ll get a deluxe pie with mushrooms, green peppers, and pepperoni on it. In Québec, it's known as a pizza tout garnie.

7. Flyers

Slices of pepperoni pizza are called flyers, reportedly because of the way they’re often tossed around like Frisbees.

8. Guppies

Depending on your perspective, guppies is either a really cute or really gross way to describe anchovies. Other slang words for the fishy topping include chovies, carp, penguin food, and smellies.

9. Alpo

It’s not very appetizing, but crumbled sausage does kind of resemble dog food—hence the Alpo moniker. Other nicknames for the topping include Kibbles ‘n Bits and Puppy Chow, neither of which make the topping sound any more appetizing.

10. Screamers

Woman preparing a mushroom pizza at home
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Mushrooms are sometimes called screamers because of the high-pitched squeal the canned variety lets out when they’re tossed onto a hot surface.

11. Edgar Allan

What does a pizza with pepperoni and onions spell out? A PO pie—which is close enough in spelling to Edgar Allan Poe's last name that it gets tossed around in pizza kitchens on occasion. Sure, P-O or Po would be easier (and quicker) to say, but it’s not nearly as fun.

12. Blood pie

Also known as a hemorrhage, this gruesome term refers to a pizza with extra tomato sauce on it. Now please forget that we ever told you that.

13. Coastline

The coastline is that little bit of exposed sauce you can see between the sauce and the crust.

14. Mutz

A margherita pizza fresh from the oven
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Mutz is simply a quicker way of saying mozzarella. Likewise, wet mutz is fresh mozzarella.

15. Roadie

When you get a slice of pizza to-go, that’s a roadie. Enjoy it while it's still hot (but not so hot as to cause an avalanche)! 

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