Hugh Hefner’s Personal Copy of Playboy #1 Can Be Yours

Courtesy of Julien's Auctions
Courtesy of Julien's Auctions

In order to garner attention for his brand-new publication, a men’s lifestyle magazine he titled Playboy, Hugh Hefner took the audacious step of featuring actress Marilyn Monroe in the nude for the debut issue in December 1953. Monroe didn’t pose for the magazine, though: Hefner bought her nude images from a previous modeling session that took place in 1949, before Monroe’s career had taken off. Hefner paid $500 for the photos. He sold out his print run of 70,000 copies. The rest is history.

Following Hefner’s death in September 2017 at age 91, some of his personal effects have made their way to the auction block. The latest collection, which will be featured in a Julien’s Auctions sale running November 30 and December 1, includes Hefner’s personal copy of that first issue, which is expected to fetch between $3000 and $5000. The original cover price was 50 cents.

The cover of the first issue of 'Playboy' features Marilyn Monroe
Courtesy of Julien's Auctions

Also on tap at the auction: a custom-made Playboy Monopoly board game (which is estimated to sell for between $6000 and $8000); a leather Los Angeles Lakers jacket with the Playboy insignia (worth $3000 to $5000); an Underwood Standard portable typewriter Hefner used in college (valued at $300 to $500); his trademark smoking jacket (which should go for $3000 to $5000); and Hefner’s entire personal collection of Playboy, all bound in leather volumes, which experts value somewhere between $20,000 and $40,000. Proceeds from the auction will be directed to the Hugh M. Hefner Foundation, which supports civil liberties and First Amendment rights.

While Hefner’s copy of that first issue is expected to generate considerable interest, it continues to provoke considerable controversy, as using Monroe’s photos was deemed exploitative. She did appear, at least publicly, to have a sense of humor about inadvertently launching Hefner’s empire. “Her famous comment was, ‘I had nothing on but the radio,’” Hefner told NPR in 1999. “And that classic reaction in that very repressive time—because one must remember ... how really conservative the '50s were—for a major star to ... treat it in such a casual way with humor was a revelation, and a very welcome one.”

If you’re in the Los Angeles area, you’ll be able to browse the collection in person from November 26 through November 30.

Game of Thrones's Kit Harington Admits He Cried (Twice) Filming Final Season

Neilson Barnard, Getty Images
Neilson Barnard, Getty Images

If you thought it was emotional being a fan of Game of Thrones as the final season is upon us, imagine being one of the show's stars. Many of the cast members have been ​very vocal about how "bittersweet" the finale is, preparing us for the heartbreak that will be life without Game of Thrones. As for Kit Harington, he has even admitted that he cried while filming the final season—twice.

For Entertainment Weekly's recent ​cover story, not only did Harington grace the cover alongside Emilia Clarke, but he dished on the most emotional moments during filming for Season 8.

Harington revealed he had not read the scripts ahead of time, instead choosing to hear it all during the table reads. "I walked in saying, 'Don’t tell me, I don’t want to know,'" the 31-year-old actor told Entertainment Weekly. "What’s the point of reading it to myself in my own head when I can listen to people do it and find out with my friends?" And when he was finally surrounded by the cast and crew for the first table read, he "wept."

Harington also cried at the end of the very last table read.

"The second time was the very end," he shared. "Every season, you read at the end of the last script ‘End of Season 1,' or ‘End of Season 2.' This read ‘End of Game of Thrones.'" The chills are real.

Although the final season is still being held tightly under wraps, the EW cover story did reveal a few details, namely a description of the ​opening moments of the first episode, which has "plenty of callbacks" to the pilot.

Time is ticking away until 2019, when the final Game of Thrones season is expected to premiere.

10 Amazing Facts About Stan Lee

BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images

Comic book legend Stan Lee’s life was always an open book. The co-creator of some of the greatest superheroes and most beloved stories of all time, Lee—who passed away on November 12 at the age of 95—became just as mythical and larger-than-life as the characters in the panels. In 2015, around the time of Marvel’s 75th anniversary, Lee had the idea to reflect on his own life, as he said, “in the one form it has never been depicted, as a comic book … or if you prefer, a graphic memoir.”

The result, published by the Touchstone imprint of Simon & Schuster in 2015, was Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir—which was written by Lee with Peter David and features artwork by cartoonist and illustrator Colleen Doran. Here are 10 things we learned about Lee.

1. HIS WIFE WAS ALSO HIS BARBER.

As a bit of a throwaway fact, Stanley Martin Lieber (Stan Lee) revealed the secret of his slicked back mane on the second page of his memoir. “My whole adult life, I’ve never been to a barber,” he wrote. “Joanie always cuts my hair.”

2. HIS CONFIDENCE CAME FROM HIS MOTHER.

Lee wrote that as a child he loved to read books by Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, and others, and his mother often watched him read: “I probably got my self-confidence from the fact that my mother thought everything I did was brilliant.”

3. YOUNG STAN LEE WROTE OBITUARIES.

Before writing about the fantastic lives of fictional characters, Lee wrote antemortem obituaries for celebrities at an undisclosed news office in New York. He said that he eventually quit that job because it was too “depressing.”

4. CAPTAIN AMERICA WAS HIS FIRST BIG BREAK.

A week into his job at Timely Comics, Lee got the opportunity to write a two-page Captain America comic. He wrote it under the pen name Stan Lee (which became his legal name) and titled it "Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge." His first full comic script would come in Captain America Issue 5, published August 1, 1941.

5. HE WROTE TRAINING FILMS FOR THE ARMY WITH DR. SEUSS.

After being transferred from the army’s Signal Corps in New Jersey, Lee worked as a playwright in the Training Film Division in Queens with eight other men, including a few who went on to be very famous: Pulitzer Prize-winning author William Saroyan, cartoonist Charles Addams (creator of The Addams Family), director Frank Capra (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington [1939] and It’s a Wonderful Life [1946]) and Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss.

6. HE DEFIED THE COMICS CODE AUTHORITY WITH AN ANTI-DRUG COMIC.

In 1971, Lee received a letter from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare asking him to put an anti-drug message in one of his books. He came up with a Spider-Man story that involved his best friend Harry abusing pills because of a break-up. The CCA would not approve the story with their seal because of the mention of drugs, but Lee convinced his publisher, Martin Goodman, to run the comic anyway.

7. AN ISSUE AT THE PRINTERS TURNED THE HULK GREEN.

The character was supposed to be gray, but according to Lee, the printer had a hard time keeping the color consistent. “So as of issue #2,” Lee wrote, “with no explanation, he turned green.”

8. HIS WIFE DESTROYED HIS PRIZED TYPEWRITER.

According to Lee, during an argument, Joanie destroyed the typewriter he used to write the first issues for characters including Spider-Man and The Fantastic Four. “This happened before eBay," he wrote. "Too bad. I could’ve auctioned the parts and made a mint.”

9. A FIRE DESTROYED HIS INTERVIEWS AND LECTURES.

When Lee moved his family to Los Angeles, he set up a studio in Van Nuys where he stored videotapes of his talks and interviews, along with a commissioned bust of his wife. The building was lost to a blaze that the fire department believed was arson, but no one was ever charged with the crime.

10. HIS FAVORITE MARVEL FILM CAMEO WAS BASED ON ONE FROM THE COMICS.

Beginning with the first Spider-Man film in 2002, Stan Lee has made quick cameos in Marvel films as a service to the fans. He said that his appearance in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007) was inspired by the story of Reed and Sue Richards’ wedding in Fantastic Four Annual Volume 1 #3, in which he and artist/writer Jack Kirby attempt to crash the ceremony but are thwarted.

A version of this story ran in 2015.

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