Why Most Dogs Love Water, But Cats Hate It

iStock/adogslifephoto
iStock/adogslifephoto

​Cats are pretty incredible animals. They're cute and clever and seemingly fearless, but we all know one thing that's likely to make them uneasy: water.

While some animals love to go for a swim, cats are generally not one of them. Though not all cats despise the water (Maine Coons are known to enjoy it), the average domestic kitty would probably prefer that you didn't try to stick her in the bathtub. Kelley Bollen, an animal behavior consultant and the former director of behavior programs for the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University, told Life Little's Mysteries why.

"One contributing factor could be that their hair coat doesn't dry quickly and it's simply uncomfortable to be soaking wet," Bollen said.

Bollen also pointed to felines' quirky personalities as another contributing factor to their displeasure with swimming.

"[B]ecause cats are control freaks and like four feet on a solid surface, they do not appreciate the sensation of floating in the water," she said.

But why do dogs not have that same fear? Well, according to Bollen, some of them—including the Portuguese Water Dog, the Duck Tolling Retriever, and the Irish Water Spaniel—are specifically bred to work in the water. And even outside of genetic factors, dogs are also more likely to be introduced to water in a more pleasant manner from an early age than cats are.

However, there are some exceptions to the rule.

FDA Recalls Several Dry Dog Foods That Could Cause Toxic Levels of Vitamin D

iStock.com/Chalabala
iStock.com/Chalabala

The FDA has recalled several brands of dry dog food that contain potentially toxic levels of vitamin D, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. While vitamin D is essential for dogs, too much of the nutrient can result in kidney failure and other serious health problems.

The FDA has already received reports of vitamin D toxicity in dogs that consumed certain dry foods. Pet owners are advised to stop using the following products:

Old Glory Hearty Turkey and Cheese Flavor Dog Food (manufactured by Sunshine Mills, Inc.)

Evolve Chicken & Rice Puppy Dry Dog Food (Sunshine Mills, Inc.)

Sportsman's Pride Large Breed Puppy Dry Dog Food (Sunshine Mills, Inc.)

Triumph Chicken & Rice Recipe Dry Dog Food (Sunshine Mills, Inc.)

Nature's Promise Chicken & Brown Rice Dog Food (Ahold Delhaize)

Nature's Place Real Country Chicken and Brown Rice Dog Food (Ahold Delhaize)

Abound Chicken and Brown Rice Recipe Dog Food (sold at Kroger in Louisville, Kentucky, as well as King Soopers and City Market stores in Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Wyoming)

ELM Chicken and Chickpea Recipe (ELM Pet Foods, Inc.)

ELM K9 Naturals Chicken Recipe (ELM Pet Foods, Inc.)

ANF Lamb and Rice Dry Dog Food (ANF, Inc.)

Orlando Grain-Free Chicken & Chickpea Superfood Recipe (sold at Lidl stores)

Natural Life Pet Products Chicken & Potato Dry Dog Food

Nutrisca Chicken and Chickpea Dry Dog Food

For the full list of UPC and lot numbers involved in the recall, visit the FDA's website.

Symptoms of vitamin D poisoning usually develop 12 to 36 hours after pets consume a suspect food, according to PetMD. The FDA says those symptoms include vomiting, loss of appetite, increased thirst, increased urination, excessive drooling, and weight loss. "Customers with dogs who have consumed this product and are exhibiting these symptoms should contact their veterinarian as soon as possible," the FDA writes.

The agency says the situation is still developing, and it will update the list of recalled brands as more information becomes available. According to WKRN News, veterinary professionals recommend sticking to dog foods that have an AAFCO label (from the Association of American Feed Control Officials) on them.

[h/t The Atlanta Journal-Constitution]

The Ultimate Cat Quiz

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER