The Best Time to Eat Thanksgiving Dinner, According to Twitter

iStock/Rawpixel
iStock/Rawpixel

On Thursday, November 22, millions of people across America will celebrate Thanksgiving, but when exactly they sit down to eat the big meal varies from household to household. According to Twitter data reported by Food & Wine, families tend to eat Thanksgiving dinner earlier than later, with most people wrapping up the feast before 6 p.m.

On Thanksgiving day, tweets containing the word turkey peak around 11 a.m. This is presumably the time that most home cooks are loading their birds into the oven, because mentions of dinnertime and time to eat spike roughly three hours later at 2 p.m. (The word pie also peaks around this time, suggesting that diners are already fantasizing about dessert when dinner hits the table.) Twitter users get their social media expressions of gratitude out of the way early, with tweets with word thankful spiking at noon.

Post-meal tweets start to roll in in the late afternoon. Around 4 p.m., when people are feeling the effects of fatty foods and wine, tweets mentioning the word nap are at an all-day high. At 8 p.m., people start to regret the choices they made hours earlier with the phrases stomach ache and over eating spiking.

The tweets that make up this data haven't been adjusted for each user's local time zone, with Twitter deferring to Eastern Time, so it's possible that the timeline skews even earlier. If that's the case at your house, you may want to whip up a late second dinner with your Thanksgiving leftovers before Black Friday.

[h/t Food & Wine]

A Full Pink Moon Is Coming in April

Ana Luisa Santo, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0
Ana Luisa Santo, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

Mark your calendars for Friday, April 19 and get ready to snap some blurry pictures of the sky on your way to work. A full pink moon will appear early that morning, according to a calendar published by The Old Farmer's Almanac.

Considering that the full moon cycle is completed every 29.5 days, the April full moon will be the fourth full moon of 2019. Despite its name, the surface of the moon doesn't actually appear rosy. The name refers to the wild ground phlox, a type of pink wildflower, that tends to sprout in the U.S. and Canada around this time of year. It's also sometimes called an egg moon, fish moon, or sprouting grass moon.

What does the Full Pink Moon mean?

The April full moon might be a bit of a misnomer, but it still plays a pretty important role in the Christian tradition. The date on which the full pink moon appears has historically been used to determine when Easter will be observed. The holiday always falls on the Sunday following the first full moon that appears after the spring equinox. However, if the full moon falls on a Sunday, Easter will be held the following Sunday.

This rule dates back to 325 C.E., when a group of Christian churches called the First Council of Nicaea decided that the light of the full moon would help guide religious pilgrims as they traveled ahead of the holiday. Since the full moon will be visible on April 19 this year, Easter will be held on April 21.

When to see the full pink moon

The best time to view this April full moon is around 4:12 a.m. on the West Coast and 7:12 a.m. on the East Coast. The exact time will vary depending on your location. For a more specific estimate, head to the Almanac's website and type in your city and state or ZIP code.

If you happen to miss this spectacle because you're enjoying a full night’s sleep, don't fret too much. A full flower moon will be arriving in May.

Why Are There No Snakes in Ireland?

iStock
iStock

Legend tells of St. Patrick using the power of his faith to drive all of Ireland’s snakes into the sea. It’s an impressive image, but there’s no way it could have happened.

There never were any snakes in Ireland, partly for the same reason that there are no snakes in Hawaii, Iceland, New Zealand, Greenland, or Antarctica: the Emerald Isle is, well, an island.

Eightofnine via Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Once upon a time, Ireland was connected to a larger landmass. But that time was an ice age that kept the land far too chilly for cold-blooded reptiles. As the ice age ended around 10,000 years ago, glaciers melted, pouring even more cold water into the now-impassable expanse between Ireland and its neighbors.

Other animals, like wild boars, lynx, and brown bears, managed to make it across—as did a single reptile: the common lizard. Snakes, however, missed their chance.

The country’s serpent-free reputation has, somewhat perversely, turned snake ownership into a status symbol. There have been numerous reports of large pet snakes escaping or being released. As of yet, no species has managed to take hold in the wild—a small miracle in itself.

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