New York City's Legendary Carnegie Deli Is Reopening With 1950s Menu Prices

Storefront of Carnegie Deli in Midtown Manhattan.
Storefront of Carnegie Deli in Midtown Manhattan.
Kevin Hagen, Getty Images

The number of old-school Manhattan restaurants got a lot a little smaller in 2016, when the Carnegie Deli—previously one of the longest-operating Jewish delicatessens in the city—announced it was closing its doors after 80 years in business. Less than two years after serving its last hot pastrami sandwich, the Times Square Chronicles reports that the Carnegie Deli will reopen: This time as a retro pop-up selling sandwiches for what they would have cost back in the 1950s.

The restaurant is returning as part of a promotion for season two of the hit Amazon series The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. From December 1 to December 8, diners will be able to visit the Carnegie Deli at its new location at 201 Lafayette Street, a couple miles south of its old address in Midtown.

In the spirit of the show, which is set in New York City in 1958, the interior of the deli has been transported back to the mid-century. When they're not not eating, customers can play around with the jukebox and photo booth. Even the menu has been updated with vintage prices: The Maisel sandwich, with pastrami, salami, coleslaw, and special sauce, costs $.99; a mini knish is just $.75; and a black and white cookie sells for $.50. For comparison, the Reuben sandwich was listed at $30 when the original deli closed in 2016.

To experience a piece of Manhattan history before it disappears (again) for good, you can head to HomeOfTheMaisel.com and add your name to the waiting list. The pop-up will also be accepting take-out orders the week of the December 1, with all proceeds from the restaurant going to the Lower Eastside Girls Club.

A Resin-Preserved KFC Drumstick Can Be Yours for $100

Kentucky for Kentucky
Kentucky for Kentucky

Many devoted KFC fans love the chain's crispy fried chicken for its signature taste and mouthwatering aroma. If you just love the way the chicken looks, now you can keep it on your shelf to admire forever. As Food & Wine reports, Kentucky for Kentucky is selling whole KFC drumsticks encapsulated in resin for $100.

Kentucky for Kentucky, an independent organization that promotes the Bluegrass State, unveiled the jars of "Chick-Infinity" on its website earlier in June. The chicken pieces are authentic Colonel's original recipe drumsticks sourced from a KFC restaurant in Coal Run, Kentucky. While they were at their golden-brown peak, Kentucky artist Coleman Larkin submerged them in 16-ounce Mason jars filled with clear resin "with all the care of a Southern mamaw putting up greasy beans for the winter." 

KFC drumstick in a jar.
Kentucky for Kentucky

The project, part of Larkin's Dixieland Preserves line of Southern-themed resin encapsulations (which also includes the preserved poop of a Kentucky Derby winner), aims to present the iconic Kentucky product in a new way. "Honestly, is there anything better than biting into a warm, crispy KFC drumstick after a day at the lake?" Kentucky for Kentucky writes in a blog post, "we wanted to capture that feeling in a product that didn’t disappear into a pile of bones as soon as it’s opened."

Only 50 of the finger-licking artworks were created, and at $100 a piece, they're worth the price of several KFC family buckets. You can grab one while they're still available from the Kentucky for Kentucky online store.

[h/t Food & Wine]

The World’s Largest Underwater Restaurant Just Opened in Norway—Take a Peek Inside

Ivar Kvaal
Ivar Kvaal

Months before it opened, the world's largest underwater restaurant in Norway was already flooded with reservations. Recently, Business Insider reported that Under has finally started serving its first guests. If you can't book a table at the hottest restaurant below sea level, you can look at the photos taken inside to get an idea of the unique dining experience.

In addition to being the largest underwater restaurant on Earth, Under, from the architecture firm Snøhetta, is also the first of its kind in Europe. It's located in the notoriously treacherous waters off Norway's southern coast.

Underwater restaurant jutting out of the sea.
Ivar Kvaal

After entering the angled building from the shore, guests descend into a 100-person dining room with panoramic views of the ocean and passing marine life. The concrete structure is designed to blend seamlessly into the surrounding environment, eventually acting as an artificial reef that attracts plants and animals. The location boasts such biodiversity that Under is also being used as a research center for marine biologists.

Dining room of underwater restaurant.
Ivar Kvaal

Jellyfish in the ocean.
Ivar Kvaal

Once seated, diners will be treated to a seasonal meal from an international team of chefs led by Nicolai Ellitsgaard. The menu highlights locally sourced produce and sustainably caught wildlife. A full meal lasts roughly three-and-a-half to four hours.

Shellfish dish at Under restaurant.
Stian Broch

Spiny crab.
Stian Broch

Dining room of Under, the underwater restaurant.
Ivar Kvaal

Dining room of Under
Inger Marie Grini/Bo Bedre Norge

Seats at Under are fully booked from now to the end of September. If you're content with getting your name on a waiting list, you can try to reserve a table for earlier in the year through the restaurant's website.

[h/t Business Insider]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER