The Reason Why Dogs Dig (and How to Make Them to Stop)

iStock/boschettophotography
iStock/boschettophotography

Digging is a totally normal canine behavior, but that doesn't make it any less annoying. If your dog is spending hours tearing up the backyard, or attempting to burrow holes into your couch, you're no doubt anxious to find a way to make it stop. The most effective way to get to the bottom of the problem, and curb your pup's desire to destroy everything in the path of their overactive paws, is to first understand why they are digging, according to The Dog People.

If your dog is digging random holes throughout your yard, it is most likely because they smell or hear something underground and are trying to get to it. In this case, digging a larger hole where it is acceptable for them to dig can keep them from digging all over the yard. Train them to dig only there by burying treats in that hole for them to find.

Another cause of unwanted digging is boredom and a lack of exercise. Puppies and high-energy dogs need a certain amount of exercise to work off all the energy they have. If they aren’t getting enough, they might turn to digging to take care of that. Make sure your dog gets plenty of playtime and take them on walks when you can.

Like a toddler, dogs can easily be distracted by a toy. If your dog seems to be digging out of boredom, try giving them a new tennis ball or dental chew.

Dogs that have very specific spots in which they dig can be stopped by adding digging deterrents to soil, especially those that are strong-smelling or uncomfortable-feeling. Burying flat rocks or plastic chicken wire will make it uncomfortable for a dog to dig, for example, and burying citrus peels, cayenne, or vinegar will make the smell while digging very unpleasant to them.

A dog could also be trailing the smell of a gopher, squirrel, rat, or other rodent while digging up your backyard. One sign of this is if they are digging near trees or plants. If this is the case, try getting rid of the rodents and see if your dog’s behavior changes.

Some dogs will dig in order to find a spot to cool down during hot weather. By helping your dog cool off, you can prevent the bad habit.

Rhode Island Approves Bill to Create an Animal Abuser Registry

iStock/Kerkez
iStock/Kerkez

In what could be a major step toward curbing animal cruelty, Rhode Island just passed a bill requiring convicted abusers to be placed on a statewide registry. The objective? To make sure they don’t adopt another animal.

According to KUTV, the bill was approved by the Rhode Island House of Representatives on Thursday and is awaiting Senate approval. Under the law, anyone convicted of abusing an animal would be required to pay a $125 fee and register with the database. The collection of names will be made available to animal shelters and adoption agencies, which will be required to check the registry before adopting out any pets. If the prospective owner’s name appears, they will not be permitted to adopt the animal.

Convicted abusers have five days to register, either from the time of their conviction if no jail time is mandated or from the time of their release. The prohibition on owning another animal lasts 15 years. If they're convicted a second time, they would be banned for life.

A number of communities across the country have enacted similar laws in recent years, including Hillsborough County in Florida, Cook County in Illinois, and New York City. The state of Louisiana was fielding a bill last week, but the proposal was ultimately pulled from committee consideration after a critical response from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA). The group’s policy statement argues that registries are costly to maintain, not often utilized by adoption centers, and don’t address the potential for abusers to find animals in other ways. The group also asserts that registries may influence potential convictions, as defendants and their legal representation might plea to lesser charges to avoid being placed in the database. The ASPCA instead recommends court-mandated no-contact orders for convicted animal abusers.

[h/t KUTV]

This Inflatable Sloth Pool Float Is the Perfect Accessory for Lazy Summer Days

SwimWays
SwimWays

Summer is the perfect time to channel your inner sloth. Even if you don't plan on sleeping 15 to 20 hours a day, you can take inspiration from the animal's lifestyle and plan to move as little as possible. This supersized sloth pool float from SwimWays, spotted by Romper, will help you achieve that goal.

It's hard not to feel lazy when you're being hugged by a giant inflatable sloth. This floating pool chair is 50 inches long, 40 inches tall, and 36 inches wide, with two "arms" to support you as you lounge in the water.

One of the sloth's paws includes a built-in cup holder, so you don't have to expend any extra energy by getting up in order to stay hydrated. Unlike some pool floats, this accessory allows you to sit upright—which means you can drink, read, or talk to the people around you without straining your neck.

The sloth floatie is available for $35 on Amazon or Walmart. SwimWays also makes the same product in different animal designs, including a panda and a teddy bear. And if you're looking for a pool accessory that gives you even more room to spread out, this inflatable dachshund float may be just what you need.

People sitting in animal pool floats.
SwimWays

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