11 Perfect Pop Chart Lab Posters for Every Person on Your Gift List

Courtesy of Pop Chart Lab.
Courtesy of Pop Chart Lab.

It’s no secret that we love Pop Chart Lab and the satisfying symmetry their posters bring to our homes and offices. Pay that satisfaction forward this holiday season by picking one of these posters for the obsessives in your life—there's something for everyone.

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1. For the Space Nerd: The Chart of Cosmic Exploration


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

The Chart of Cosmic Exploration maps our solar system and how we’ve explored it in massive and satisfying detail, making it the perfect gift for astronomers and star gazers alike. PCL's History of Space Travel poster is another epic piece of art for those who love space, history, and adventure with equal enthusiasm.

2. For the Voracious Reader: 100 Essential Novels Scratch off Chart


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

PCL can help bibliophiles keep track of their accomplishments with this scratch off poster of 100 classic novels, including The Lord of the Rings, Native Son, 1984, Pride and Prejudice, and more; removing the gold foil reveals "a narrative specific design." Your book-obsessed recipient might also dig this chart of Diagrammed Sentences featuring the first lines of famous novels from The Road to The Bell Jar.

3. For the Beer Enthusiast: The Very, Very Many Varieties of Beer


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

This poster—which features "89 varieties of beer with over 200 representative quaffs" and notes what glassware is best for each brew—is the perfect gift for the craft beer loving, IPA drinking, lager and ale connoisseur. Craft beer enthusiasts will also enjoy this scratch off poster.

4. For the Bean Freak: The Compendious Coffee Chart


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

Those who are compulsively compelled to have a cup of coffee will love the Compendious Coffee chart, which categorizes every step from bean to brew. For those with a more refined taste, PCL also offers the Exceptional Expressions of Espresso.

5. For the Film Connoisseur: 100 Essential Films Scratch Off Chart


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

Challenge the film buff in your life to complete PCL's 100 Essential Films scratch off poster, which features classics including E.T., Titanic, Rocky, Blade Runner, The Godfather, and more—then inspire them to whip up a cocktail from their fave flicks using this Cocktail Chart of Film and Literature.

6. For Rock 'n Roll Fan: Come Together: An Instrumental Investigation of the Beatles Catalog


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

A beautiful, colorful cacophony of the Beatles catalog, PCL’s “Come Together” maps the math of the instrumentation of every song the Fab Four ever released. Music fans will also love the Visual Compendium of Guitars.

7. For the Ocean Enthusiast: The Spectacular Survey of Sharks


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

Allow your gift recipient to live every week like it’s Shark Week with PCL’s Spectacular Survey of Sharks. Another under the sea option? PCL's Whales print.

8. For the Architecture Obsessed: The Architecture of American Houses


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

Whether your loved one is into architecture or American history, iconography, or imagery, PCL has them covered with this print, which features home styles from the Queen Anne to Gothic Revival and everything in between. If skyscrapers are more their style, they'll dig this poster featuring schematics from 100 superstructures.

9. For the Sneaker Freak: A Visual Compendium of Sneakers


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

This is the perfect print for your fly friend who always tries to stay fresh. Finish the fit with this print of some of the most fire jerseys from the history of basketball.

10. For the Animal Lover: The Diagram of Dogs


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

If your loved one a frequent visitor to the Rate Dogs twitter account, they'll love this print, which features 181 good dogs. Or, if cats are more their thing, PCL has a poster for that, too.

11. For the Design Nerd: A Stylistic Survey of Graphic Design


Courtesy Pop Chart Lab

This poster charts the history of graphic design starting in the Victorian era and covering art deco, pop art, heroic realism, new wave, and more. For those who double down on design, PCL also offers their Taxonomy of Typography chart.

10 Fireworks Effects You Should Know the Names Of

iStock/SuriyaDesatit
iStock/SuriyaDesatit

Fireworks actually have much more technical names than "The Ones That Do That Shooty Thing," "The Ones That Scream," or "The Ones That Kind of Sparkle Out." Before you take in this year's fireworks shows, here's a mini lesson on the ones you might spot at whatever pyrotechnic display you attend this Fourth of July.

1. Peony

The Peony is "a spherical break of colored stars," and is among the most popular fireworks ffects.

2. Chrysanthemum

This is a variation of the Peony—the difference is that the stars leave a visible trail of sparks.

3. Willow

The Willow is a lot like the Peony and its variations (the Chrysanthemum and the Dahlia), but it leaves trails of silver or gold stars that produce a weeping willow-ish outline.

4. Horsetail

It's a compact little burst that falls down, well, like a horsetail. You might also hear this one referred to as a Waterfall Shell.

5. Fish

When the shell bursts, little squiggles of light squirm away from the main burst. The effect looks like fish swimming away.

6. Spider

This one is fast-burning and bursts very hard, which makes the stars shoot out straight and flat—like a ton of little spider legs.

7. Palm

This one produces long, thick streams of light that look like a palm tree when it bursts.

8. Crossette

Take lots of tic-tac-toe boards and cross them over each other haphazardly. That's kind of what crossette fireworks look like. It's usually accompanied by a loud crackling noise.

9. Kamuro

Named after a Japanese hairstyle for boys, this firework has a dense burst that leaves a large, glittery trail.

10. Rings

Rings can come in a variety of shapes, and often have rings within rings.

This post originally appeared in 2009, and was updated in 2019.

6 Questions About Tetanus Shots, Answered

iStock/FotoDuets
iStock/FotoDuets

Summer brings opportunities for gardening, which is supposed to be a way to relax. But encountering a thorn, splinter, or the legendary rusty nail can often stir questions about tetanus, a disease caused by a bacterial toxin that can result in paralysis and even death. We’re vaccinated against tetanus early in life, but if you happen to suffer a puncture wound near soil, you could be wondering how long those injections are good for and how often you need a booster shot. Take a look at some common questions about tetanus and learn the best way to proceed the next time you feel a sharp poke in your hands or feet.

1. What is tetanus?

Tetanus is the name of a disease caused by the toxin of the Clostridium tetani bacterium. The disease attacks the central nervous system, causing stiffened muscles, increased heart rate, and fever. The muscle spasms can be severe, leading to broken bones, vocal cord issues, and breathing problems. A tightening of the facial muscles gives tetanus the informal name of “lockjaw.” Symptoms usually appear between three and 21 days following exposure. Due to breathing problems caused by the stiffened muscles, one to two people out of every 10 will die as a result of the infection. But because of the effectiveness of the vaccine, the United States sees only about 50 cases of tetanus each year.

2. How do people get tetanus?

People contract tetanus when the bacteria enters the body in an open wound. Because the bacteria is typically found in soil or manure, puncture wounds as a result of landscaping can be of particular concern, though these “dirty wounds” can also be a result of any injury involving soil, feces, or saliva, like a human or animal bite.

3. Aren’t people vaccinated against tetanus as infants?

Yes. Infants receive a total of four DTaP shots at 2, 4, and 6 months of age, and again between 15 and 18 months. A fifth shot is given when the child is between 4 and 6 years old. DTaP is a combination vaccine that protects against tetanus as well as diphtheria—an infection that attacks the mucus membranes of the nose and throat—and pertussis (whooping cough). An additional booster shot for all three (called Tdap) is given at 11 to 12 years of age.

4. Why would anyone need a tetanus booster shot?

Tetanus vaccines do not last for a lifetime. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that adults receive a tetanus booster (Td) every 10 years. (Pregnant women should get Tdap in their third trimester to help boost a baby’s resistance to whooping cough.) If they did not get Tdap as a preteen, they should have that instead. The booster can be given at any time and is typically administered even if an adult doesn’t remember or their health records don’t indicate the last time they received a shot. Virtually everyone who receives the shot will be protected against tetanus for the subsequent decade. Roughly 95 out of 100 people will be protected against diphtheria. Roughly 98 out of 100 children will be resistant to whooping cough within a year of receiving their last dose, or seven in 10 if the dose was given within the last five years. Overall, Tdap protects against whooping cough in seven out of 10 people in the first year, and three to four out of 10 people within four years.

In 2016, a study in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases [PDF] suggested that immunity might actually last as long as 30 years for tetanus and diphtheria. The CDC, however, has not yet altered its guidelines for vaccinations.

5. Should I get a tetanus booster shot if I get a puncture wound even if I just had a shot a few years ago?

If you have had a documented booster shot within the past five years and suffer a puncture wound, your physician won’t likely recommend another. If it’s been more than five years, you will probably receive a booster as a precaution. If your vaccination status is unclear, your doctor will administer a primary series of three doses. You might also be given TIG, a shot which provides temporary immunity and an antitoxin.

6. What should I do if I suffer a puncture wound?

If you are injured with an object from an area that could potentially harbor Clostridium tetani, wash the affected body part thoroughly and contact your physician to see if your tetanus vaccinations are up to date. If it’s been more than five years or your status is unclear, you’ll be given a booster.

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