Nomophobia Is Cambridge Dictionary's Word of the Year For 2018—And You Might Have It

iStock.com/OcusFocus
iStock.com/OcusFocus

Nomophobia is the Cambridge Dictionary’s word of the year for 2018, and it describes a condition many of us are familiar with—even if we never knew there was a term for it. According to The Independent, the dictionary definition is “a fear or worry at the idea of being without your mobile phone or unable to use it.” So basically, it’s that feeling you get when you enter the bathroom and realize your phone is in the bedroom.

The word phobia, of course, means fear, while mo stands for mobile phone. In other words, nomophobia can be understood as no mobile phone phobia, and it’s certainly a timely word. Recent surveys have shown that people use their smartphones more than five hours per day on average, and the iPhone rolled out its Screen Time feature—which offers real-time data about your smartphone use—in 2018.

Psychologists have been talking about internet addiction since the early days of the world wide web, and the American Psychiatric Association recommended that "internet gaming disorder" be studied more closely in 2013. However, medical literature doesn’t specifically mention smartphone addiction, which is what the term nomophobia seems to imply.

According to Dr. Marc Potenza, a professor of psychiatry and neuroscience at the Yale School of Medicine, the two predominant mental disorder manuals tend to focus on specific behaviors (like gaming) rather than the method of delivery (in this case, a smartphone).

Still, nomophobia is popping up more frequently in scientific studies. Researchers from the City University of Hong Kong and Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul titled their 2017 paper on the phenomenon “Understanding Nomophobia.”

“When users perceive smartphones as their extended selves, they are more likely to become attached to the devices, which, in turn, leads to nomophobia by heightening the phone proximity-seeking tendency,” researchers wrote in the abstract of their study, which was published in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

As the “people’s word of 2018,” nomophobia was chosen by the public in a poll. It beat out the three other shortlisted words that the good people at Cambridge Dictionary felt best summarized the year, for better or worse. The others were ecocide (destruction of the environment), no-platforming (refusing to let someone publicly express ideas perceived as dangerous or unacceptable), and gender gap (differences in the ways men and women are treated).

[h/t The Independent]

Game of Thrones Fans Have Been Mispronouncing Khaleesi

HBO
HBO

While Game of Thrones fans are busy poring over every still image and official trailer released for the show's final season in the hope of noticing some tiny detail that might hint at what's to come, David Peterson—the linguist who creates the series' fictional languages—dropped a huge piece of information: we've all been mispronouncing  Khaleesi.

While being interviewed for The Allusionist podcast, Peterson described the rampant mispronunciation as "a real thorn in my side." So just how should we be saying the Dothraki word?

"I wanted to make sure if something was spelled differently, it was pronounced differently," Peterson explained of his process of transforming the handful of Dothraki words George R.R. Martin had created into a full language. "That worked pretty well for everything except the word Khaleesi ... There's no way it should be pronounced 'ka-LEE-see' based on the spelling. So I had to decide, 'Am I going to respell this thing because I know how people are going to pronounce this, or am I going to honor that spelling and pronounce it differently?' I made the latter decision and I think it was the wrong decision."

(That said, in his book Living Language Dothraki, Peterson writes that "many Dothraki words have multiple pronunciation variants, often depending on whether the speaker is native or non-native. Khaleesi, for example, has three separate pronunciations: khal-eh-si, khal-ee-si, and kal-ee-si," which at a later point in the book spelled is "ka-lee-si.")

Given that Daenerys Targaryen has a mouthful of other titles at her disposal, we'll just call her the Mother of Dragons from now on.

Game of Thrones returns for its final season on April 14, 2019.

[h/t: Digital Spy]

The 10 Most Popular Puppy Names of 2019

iStock.com/Lakshmi3
iStock.com/Lakshmi3

If you brought home a new dog or puppy recently and named it Luna, you’re far from the only one. The name, which means moon in Latin, is the most popular puppy name for 2019.

This analysis of cute canine monikers comes from Trupanion, a provider of medical insurance for pets. The company looked at its database of 500,000 dogs and crunched the numbers to identify the names that are currently having a moment. (Although some of the names that cracked the top 10 list, like Daisy and Max, have been around for quite some time.)

Interestingly, Luna wasn’t always popular. As Trupanion points out, “Looking back 10 years, Luna was barely a blip on the name game chart … not even cracking the list of top 20 names.” Nor did it appear on ​Banfield Pet Hospital's list of the 10 most popular dog names of 2018.

Often, there's some overlap between popular pet names and baby names. Luna was the 31st most popular baby name for girls in 2018. This is perhaps linked to the popularity of the Harry Potter character Luna Lovegood, as well as the publicity the name has received in recent years from celebrities like John Legend and Chrissy Teigen and Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem, as both couples named their daughters Luna.

Second on the list of popular puppy names is Bella (its longer form, Isabella, was the fifth most popular baby name for girls last year). Check out the top 10 list below to see if your pooch’s name is trending right now.

1. Luna
2. Bella
3. Charlie
4. Bailey
5. Lucy
6. Cooper
7. Max
8. Daisy
9. Bear
10. Oliver

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