This Portable Carafe Heats Your Water to Exactly the Temperature You Want—While You Pour

Heatworks
Heatworks

One day soon, you may not need to stand around trying to watch water boil—it will boil instantaneously as you’re pouring it into your cup. The Duo Smart Untethered Carafe, a portable smart carafe that just debuted at the consumer tech trade show CES, is designed to heat filtered water as it comes out of the spout.

Created by Heatworks, the carafe works by utilizing Ohmic Array Technology, a patented system the company developed that harnesses water’s natural conductivity to generate heat. Rather than using heating elements that then warm up the water (which lends itself to lag time), the carafe passes electrical currents through the water to increase the energy state of the water molecules. The result, Heatworks says, is instant hot water.

Because of this rapid heating ability, the Duo is able to heat water as it pours out of the carafe’s spout, rather than heating up the full tank of water, as a conventional kettle—either electric or stovetop—does. The temperature of the water can be controlled within 1°F by changing how quickly the water passes through the spout, making it the ideal product if you want to make perfect pour-over coffee. (Too lazy for pour-overs? We highly recommend Ninja's Hot & Cold Brewed System.)

The carafe features an elegant product design by frog, a global design agency that has previously worked on projects like Honeywell’s Lyric smart thermostat system. While most (though not all) electric kettles are industrial-looking and utilitarian, the Duo can blend seamlessly into your minimalist kitchen vibe. It’s battery operated, so you can store it anywhere, but you’ll definitely want to leave it out on your counter so that it's in full view of all your guests.

A Duo carafe on a counter with dishware
Heatworks

The only problem? You can’t buy it yet, and The Verge notes that the company doesn’t have a working prototype at CES. When it will actually hit the market is hard to say: Heatworks founder/CEO Jerry Callahan told The Verge that the hope is to ship it as soon as this summer, but there is no public target date yet. When it does come out, it will likely cost somewhere below $200.

There’s good reason to believe that Heatworks will make good on its promise. The company already sells its Ohmic Array Technology in the form of its Wi-Fi-enabled Model 3 tankless home water heater. And it just announced that its frog-designed Tetra Countertop Dishwasher, which debuted at CES last year and uses the same technology, will soon be available for pre-order, with prices starting at $299.

To keep tabs on when the Duo will ship, sign up for updates on the Heatworks website.

These ASMR-Ready Headphones Promise to Lull You to Sleep

AcousticSheep
AcousticSheep

What do hushed whispers, gently tapping fingernails, and Bob Ross’s voice have in common? They’re all examples of triggers that may cause what’s known as an autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR), or, as Dictionary.com succinctly explains it, a “calming, pleasurable feeling often accompanied by a tingling sensation” that can be triggered by soothing stimuli. ASMR has recently been recognized as an effective relaxation technique for those looking to calm their nerves; now, ASMR enthusiasts and novices alike can experience it in the form of a sleep-ready headband.

Upon first glance, SleepPhones: ASMR Edition may look like just a fabric headband, but the device actually features flat speakers tucked into soft, stretchy, eco-friendly material. Unlike regular headphones, SleepPhones can be worn comfortably to bed, even if you sleep on your side, and they come preloaded with content designed to help you relax. They feature eight hours of built-in ASMR content by 16 different ASMR artists (or ASMRtists), including but not limited to tracks with rhythmic tapping and "peaceful Italian whisperings."

A close-up of the SleepPhones speaker technology
AcousticSheep

The speaker components of SleepPhones
AcousticSheep

Using SleepPhones is designed to be a stress-free experience. The speakers have the ability to play for 20 ad-free hours with a mere three-hour charging time in between. There are also zero cords involved, meaning you won’t get all tangled up as you lie down or if you have a tendency to toss and turn at night. The small button located in the back of the headband allows you to start, pause, or skip tracks and control the volume.

For people looking for ways to relax beyond yoga and meditation, ASMR may be the way to go. One study observed that subjects watching ASMR videos not only reported feeling that aforementioned pleasant tingling, but were also found to have reduced heart rates.

You can get a pair of your own SleepPhones on Kickstarter with a pledge of $75 or more. They come in three different sizes with seven colors from which to choose.

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

The UK Wants to Use 'Noise Cameras' to Crack Down on Loud Cars and Bikes

iStock/Ales-A
iStock/Ales-A

Snarled traffic creates more than air pollution. Thanks to modified engines, mufflers, and exhaust systems on cars and motorcycles, congested roadways can become symphonies of belching and rattling. Now, the UK government is looking to do something about it.

According to the BBC, the Department for Transport is currently testing “acoustic cameras” that will measure the decibel levels of vehicles on public roads. If a microphone detects a vehicle producing an excessive amount of noise, a camera will photograph the source and the owner will be fined.

What defines excessive? That remains to be seen. The UK enacted a law in 2016 limiting new cars to no more than 74 decibels. It's primarily older cars and modified motorbikes that create noise disturbances and prompt complaints from people living nearby.

The trial equipment will also need to prove it can identify one vehicle's noise emissions from another's and single out cars from other possible sources of sound. If the trial results are promising, it's likely the "acoustic cameras" will be policing UK roads in the near future.

[h/t Jalopnik]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER