IMDb Has Launched Its Own Free Movie Streaming Service

iStock.com/dusanpetkovic
iStock.com/dusanpetkovic

Following on the heels of YouTube's Free to Watch section, which debuted last October, the Amazon-owned IMDb website is the latest company to offer a free streaming service. As Tech Crunch reports, IMDb's newly launched Freedive platform offers U.S. viewers a mix of ad-supported TV shows and blockbuster movies—no subscription necessary.

The selection is fairly small at the moment, but there are some recognizable (and highly rated) titles on offer, including Memento, The Last Samurai, The Illusionist, Drive, Les Misérables, St. Elmo’s Fire, and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. As for the TV selection, they run the gamut from classic to fairly recent: Fringe, Quantum Leap, Heroes, Without A Trace, Gilligan's Island, and Dallas are all available for streaming.

IMDb has also moved its original, film-themed content—including The IMDb Show and Casting Calls—to the IMDb Originals section on Freedive. Viewers can watch Freedive on their phone, laptop, or any device that's also capable of pairing with Prime Video. A new icon will also appear in the "Your Apps & Channels" row on Fire TVs. "We will continue to enhance IMDb Freedive based on customer feedback and will soon make it available more widely, including on IMDb's leading mobile apps," IMDb's CEO, Col Needham, said in a statement.

While no subscription is needed, users will need to register with IMDb or Amazon, with the exception of Fire TV owners. As The Verge reports, IMDb will face stiff competition from similar free streaming platforms, including Tubi, Vudu's Movies On Us, and YouTube's Free to Watch section.

Meanwhile, the number of paid streaming services also continues to grow. If you're having trouble choosing between them, an analysis from September 2018 revealed that Hulu Plus and Prime Video offer the most bang for your buck (best selection for the price). And if you just want to figure out where to watch your favorite movie or TV show without flitting from Netflix to Hulu to Prime, there's a handy app for that.

[h/t Tech Crunch]

Peter Dinklage Can't Say Benevolent in This Game of Thrones Blooper Reel

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

There are many adjectives one might use to describe HBO's Game of Thrones. While hilarious isn't usually one of them (though the series certainly has its moments of levity), that's the best way to describe the Game of Thrones blooper reel below, in which some of your favorite throne-seekers momentarily break character—and Peter Dinklage has a problem pronouncing the word benevolent. (Warning: profanity ahead!)

Ralph Fiennes Almost Turned Down Voldemort Role in Harry Potter Movies

WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS (C) J.K.R.
WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS (C) J.K.R.

Ralph Fiennes has earned Oscar nominations for Schindler's List and The English Patient, but his best-known role might be his performance as He Who Must Not Be Named, otherwise known as Voldemort, in the Harry Potter film series. While the movies introduced Fiennes and his work to a new generation of moviegoers, he recently revealed that he almost said no to the project altogether.

We first saw Fiennes as Voldemort in the fourth film in the series, 2005's Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, and he continued to play the Dark Lord of the Harry Potter universe until the series' conclusion in 2011.

Though fans would argue that it was the role Fiennes was born to play, saying "yes" was not an immediate decision for the celebrated actor.

"The truth is I was actually ignorant about the films and the books," the actor recently admitted while appearing on The Jonathan Ross Show when asked about his relationship to the Potterverse prior to taking on the role. "I was approached by the production. Mike Newell was directing the film that they wanted me to be in ... the first time Voldemort was going to appear physically."

"Out of ignorance I just sort of thought, this isn’t for me," Fiennes continued. "Quite stupidly I resisted, I was hesitant. I think the clincher was that my sister Martha—who has three children who were then probably about 12, 10, and 8—said, 'What do you mean? You’ve got to do it!' So then I rewound my thinking."

Potterheads everywhere owe a debt of gratitude to Fiennes's sister—and her kids.

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