New Software is Looking to Crack Down on Netflix and Hulu Password Sharing

iStock.com/wutwhanfoto
iStock.com/wutwhanfoto

Not everyone who binge-watches Stranger Things is paying for the privilege. In 2017, a Reuters/Ipsos poll found that 21 percent of streaming service viewers aged 18 to 24 accessed a service like Netflix, Hulu, or HBO Go using someone else’s account and password.

Thanks to a combination of technology and an appetite for subscriber growth, you might be forced into a Netflix password reset.

At the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week, UK-based technology company Synamedia announced a software program that uses artificial intelligence to track account activity for streaming subscriptions. If login behavior is atypical—for example, an account sign-in at another home with substantially different tastes in content—the account can be flagged for review. The content provider would then have the choice of offering the user an account upgrade allowing for multiple users or disallowing the sharing activity.

Synamedia is banking on the idea that popular streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime might be interested in the technology, though past comments by executives have indicated the opposite—the companies find account sharing, even outside the household, to be an effective form of advertising.

“We love people sharing Netflix,” CEO Reed Hastings said in 2017. “That’s a positive thing, not a negative thing.”

What could change their tune? If new subscriber growth slows down. Industry analysts believe any significant drop in new account sign-ups could prompt investors to urge streaming companies to curtail sharing. That may become more of an issue as more of these content providers crop up, inching closer toward a monthly billing amount that users may compare unfavorably to expensive cable packages. If you pay for three services, you might be more tempted to borrow the password for the fourth.

Netflix has yet to comment on Synamedia’s efforts.

[h/t WTOC]

These ASMR-Ready Headphones Promise to Lull You to Sleep

AcousticSheep
AcousticSheep

What do hushed whispers, gently tapping fingernails, and Bob Ross’s voice have in common? They’re all examples of triggers that may cause what’s known as an autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR), or, as Dictionary.com succinctly explains it, a “calming, pleasurable feeling often accompanied by a tingling sensation” that can be triggered by soothing stimuli. ASMR has recently been recognized as an effective relaxation technique for those looking to calm their nerves; now, ASMR enthusiasts and novices alike can experience it in the form of a sleep-ready headband.

Upon first glance, SleepPhones: ASMR Edition may look like just a fabric headband, but the device actually features flat speakers tucked into soft, stretchy, eco-friendly material. Unlike regular headphones, SleepPhones can be worn comfortably to bed, even if you sleep on your side, and they come preloaded with content designed to help you relax. They feature eight hours of built-in ASMR content by 16 different ASMR artists (or ASMRtists), including but not limited to tracks with rhythmic tapping and "peaceful Italian whisperings."

A close-up of the SleepPhones speaker technology
AcousticSheep

The speaker components of SleepPhones
AcousticSheep

Using SleepPhones is designed to be a stress-free experience. The speakers have the ability to play for 20 ad-free hours with a mere three-hour charging time in between. There are also zero cords involved, meaning you won’t get all tangled up as you lie down or if you have a tendency to toss and turn at night. The small button located in the back of the headband allows you to start, pause, or skip tracks and control the volume.

For people looking for ways to relax beyond yoga and meditation, ASMR may be the way to go. One study observed that subjects watching ASMR videos not only reported feeling that aforementioned pleasant tingling, but were also found to have reduced heart rates.

You can get a pair of your own SleepPhones on Kickstarter with a pledge of $75 or more. They come in three different sizes with seven colors from which to choose.

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The UK Wants to Use 'Noise Cameras' to Crack Down on Loud Cars and Bikes

iStock/Ales-A
iStock/Ales-A

Snarled traffic creates more than air pollution. Thanks to modified engines, mufflers, and exhaust systems on cars and motorcycles, congested roadways can become symphonies of belching and rattling. Now, the UK government is looking to do something about it.

According to the BBC, the Department for Transport is currently testing “acoustic cameras” that will measure the decibel levels of vehicles on public roads. If a microphone detects a vehicle producing an excessive amount of noise, a camera will photograph the source and the owner will be fined.

What defines excessive? That remains to be seen. The UK enacted a law in 2016 limiting new cars to no more than 74 decibels. It's primarily older cars and modified motorbikes that create noise disturbances and prompt complaints from people living nearby.

The trial equipment will also need to prove it can identify one vehicle's noise emissions from another's and single out cars from other possible sources of sound. If the trial results are promising, it's likely the "acoustic cameras" will be policing UK roads in the near future.

[h/t Jalopnik]

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