Dog-opoly Lets You Buy Dogs Instead of Real Estate

Late for the Sky
Late for the Sky

The goal of this take on Monopoly from specialty board game company Late for the Sky isn't to rack up luxury properties. Instead, players compete to spend their fortunes on dogs of different breeds and sizes while learning fun facts about their favorite canines along the way.

Dog-opoly, one of many unofficial twists on the board game, has similar rules to the classic version. Competitors have their choice of pet-themed playing pieces—such as a dog bowl, a mailman, and a fire hydrant—to play with, and they can purchase dogs by landing on their spaces. Value correlates to breed size, with Chihuahua standing in for Mediterranean Avenue and Great Dane serving as the game's Boardwalk. (The system is one of the more creative ways themed Monopoly games have ranked properties). Each dog deed comes with facts about the breed.

Board of Dog-opoly game.
Late for the Sky

Players can collect $200 by passing Go Fetch, or give up that money by catching fleas. The Go to Jail space has been replaced with Go to Kennel, and instead of houses and hotels, players can develop their properties with dog houses and big bones.

Dog-opoly is available on Amazon for $19. If you're more of a cat person, there's an unofficial Monopoly spin-off out there for you as well.

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Plano, Texas Is Home to a Dog-Friendly Movie Theater That Serves Bottomless Wine or Whiskey

K9 Cinemas
K9 Cinemas

For dog owners in Plano, Texas, movie night with Fido no longer just means cuddling on the couch and browsing Netflix. The recently opened K9 Cinemas invites moviegoers—both human and canine—to watch classic films on the big screen. And the best part for the human members of this couple? Your $15 ticket includes bottomless wine or whiskey (or soft drinks if you're under 21).

The theater operates as a pop-up (or perhaps pup-up?) in a private event space near Custer Road and 15th Street in Plano. Snacks—both the pet and people kind—are available for $2 apiece. Dogs are limited to two per person, and just 25 human seats are sold per showing to leave room for the furry guests.

Pet owners are asked follow a few rules in order to take advantage of what the theater has to offer. Dogs must be up-to-date on all their shots, and owners can submit veterinary records online or bring a hard copy to the theater to verify their pooch's health status. Once inside, owners are responsible for taking their dog out for potty breaks and cleaning up after any accidents that happen (thankfully the floors are concrete and easy to wipe down).

While many of the movies shown are canine-themed—a recent screening of A Dog's Journey included branded bandanas with every ticket purchase—they also hold special events, like a Game of Thrones finale watch party (no word on how the puppers in attendance responded to Jon Snow finally acknowledging what a good boy Ghost is).

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