Machu Picchu Is Wheelchair-Accessible for the First Time Ever

iStock.com/DavorLovincic
iStock.com/DavorLovincic

Hiking up Machu Picchu in Peru has long been challenging for able-bodied people—and impossible for people who use wheelchairs. Now, CNN Travel reports that travel company Wheel the World has developed a special tour of Machu Picchu for disabled people, making the site wheelchair-accessible for the first time in its 600-year history.

Wheel the World is the brainchild of Alvaro Silberstein and Camilo Navarro, two friends and entrepreneurs from Chile. Their idea formed when the pair planned to hike Torres de Paine National Park in Patagonia together in 2016. Silberstein uses a wheelchair, and his regular chair wasn't suited for the journey. But following a successful crowdfunding campaign, he was able to buy a lightweight, foldable chair for the trip.

Silberstein and Navarro have since made a business out of making sites normally reserved for hikers wheelchair accessible. Wheel the World now offers tours of Easter Island and the Zapotec ruins in Mexico, but designing a tour for Machu Picchu, a site with an elevation close to 8000 feet, was their biggest challenge yet.

Machu Picchu is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and its protected status and vulnerability to erosion means wheelchair ramps can't be installed easily. Instead, Wheel the World came up with a way to provide disabled tourists with special wheelchairs at a price that wasn't outlandish. The wheelchairs are made from steel and aluminum, which makes them lightweight, and they have one wheel in the front and two long handles like a wheelbarrow, making them easier to navigate over tough terrain. A partner is needed to push the chair during the hike.

Wheelchairs are donated to the company and stored near the tour sites, which cuts down on costs. A four-day trip to Machu Picchu, including accommodations, meals, and transportation, costs Wheel the World travelers about $1500.

Wheel the World is set to give its first full tours of Machu Picchu in March 2019.

[h/t CNN Travel]

How to Avoid Paying for Your Already-Booked Hotel Room When Your Flight Is Canceled

jacoblund/iStock via Getty Images
jacoblund/iStock via Getty Images

The news that your flight has been delayed or canceled is the last thing you want to hear on your way to the airport. Flight disruptions are more than just inconvenient—they can be expensive. If you planned your trip around arriving at your destination at an exact time, rearranging your itinerary and rescheduling bookings can end up significantly stretching your travel budget. Fortunately, canceling accommodations at the last minute doesn't always have to lead to financial loss. According to Lifehacker, there are tactics you can use to get a full refund on your hotel room.

In some cases, hotels will refund your money without any hassle. Take a look at the fine print of your reservation confirmation: Many major hotel chains give customers the leeway to change or cancel their stay up to 48 to 72 hours before they arrive.

If you're canceling due to a change in flight plans, you're likely scrambling to figure things out with little time to spare. But missing the official window to change your reservation doesn't necessarily mean you're out of luck. Call the hotel's front desk directly and explain your situation. There's a chance they'll take pity on you and refund your money or allow you to tweak your dates at no extra cost. If the reason for your rescheduled flight is a severe weather event that's also affecting your destination, it's especially likely that the hotel will be understanding—and possibly even overbooked and desperate to make room for other guests.

Of course, after trying every trick in your arsenal, the hotel may simply refuse to accommodate you and force you to pay full price for a reservation you can't make use of. When that happens, it's time to look elsewhere for compensation. Under the Montreal Convention, a treaty that covers most international travel, you can receive a payout of up to $5870 to cover financial loss caused by international flight delays in some cases. Here's how to receive the biggest reimbursement possible for the cancelled flight itself at the same time.

[h/t Lifehacker]

Here’s How to Find Out If Your MacBook Pro Was Just Banned by the FAA

shironosov/iStock via Getty Images
shironosov/iStock via Getty Images

Back in June, Apple issued a recall of approximately 460,000 15-inch MacBook Pro laptops sold between September 2015 and February 2017, stating that “the battery may overheat and pose a fire safety risk.” Now, Bloomberg reports that the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has warned airlines to ban those batteries from flights.

Technically, airlines could have started banning the laptops as soon as Apple issued the recall, since 2016 airline safety instructions mandate that all recalled batteries may not fly as cargo or in carry-on baggage. The FAA has essentially alerted them to the recall and reminded them about the existing rules.

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency banned the laptops in early August, which has been implemented so far by TUI Group Airlines, Thomas Cook Airlines, Air Italy, and Air Transat. Domestic airlines in the U.S. are now following suit, so it’s worth finding out if your laptop battery is part of the recall if you have plans to fly soon. Even if you don’t have any current travel plans, it’s a good opportunity to get your recalled battery replaced—which Apple will do for free.

Fast Company outlines exactly how to check your device: Click the Apple icon in the upper left corner of your screen, and tap “About This Mac.” If you see “MacBook Pro (Retina, 15 inch, Mid 2015)” or a similar description, copy the serial number, and paste it into the box under the “Eligibility” section on this page. If your laptop was affected, scroll down and follow the directions to make an appointment for a replacement battery.

Once your battery is replaced, you’re free to fly with your MacBook; just make sure to bring documentation of your battery replacement to the airport, in case officials ask for proof.

[h/t Bloomberg]

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