7 Things You Might Have Missed in Game of Thrones’s 'The Bells'

Marc Rissmann in Game of Thrones
Marc Rissmann in Game of Thrones
HBO

Warning: Spoilers for "The Bells," the fifth episode of Game of Thrones season 8, ahead.

The Mother of Dragons and her forces finally infiltrated King’s Landing in "The Bells," the penultimate episode of Game of Thrones's final season, and it's probably safe to say that viewers were not shocked to see her arrive with full-on rage. But her ultimate decision to kill countless innocent people in the process was not easy to watch—for fans or those who know and care about Dany.

Many characters died, for better or worse, in what might’ve been the most eventful episode of the season, and now we’re left with more questions than we had going into it. But until we get to tune into next week’s series finale, here are some things you might have missed in “The Bells.”

1. The recap essentially confirmed what Daenerys was going to do.

After Missandei was killed in last week’s episode “The Last of the Starks,” audiences had a hunch that Daenerys Targaryen was going to turn into some form of the predicted Mad Queen. She definitely became what we all feared tonight, in a move that was actually made obvious in the recap before the episode began. Ending with Daenerys’s reaction to her loyal advisor getting killed, the recap also added lines from various people speaking negatively about her bloodline while showing her face looking more and more enraged. Including quotes from other characters referencing the fact that the members of House Targaryen are known to go insane just proved that Daenerys was going to do something to live up to the nickname of her father, the Mad King.

2. Jon’s repeated words as foreshadowing.

While some fans were getting annoyed at Jon Snow throughout the first half of the episode, where he spent the bulk of his time either defending Daenerys or sulking, his repeated words of loyalty definitely foreshadowed him being betrayed by Dany when she decided to burn down King’s Landing in its entirety. Jon was constantly telling everyone who challenged Daenerys that she was his queen, even telling Dany that she would “always be.” He said it so many times, it’s already become a meme. But we saw his feelings change right when innocent people started getting killed.

3. The one very confusing line from Jaime Lannister.

It's hard for Game of Thrones fans to know how to feel about Jaime Lannister at this point, as the new episode proved he really did go back to King’s Landing just to be with Cersei (and not to kill her, as some theorized). But there was one moment in "The Bells" that made absolutely no sense: When Tyrion Lannister was helping Jaime escape, he pointed out how many innocent people would wind up getting murdered at the capitol, to which Jaime replied that he never really cared for them anyway. We know this can’t be true, however, because Jaime killed a king (hence the nickname “Kingslayer”) so that he could save the people of King’s Landing. When the late Mad King, a.k.a. Aerys II Targaryen, ordered him to “burn them all,” Jaime instead killed the King so that innocent people wouldn’t have to die. So what was this line from tonight even about?

4. Another prophecy might have come true.

As "The Bells" showed all of King’s Landing being burned to the ground, it’s safe to assume the throne room is destroyed. This brings us back to Daenerys’s vision in the House of Undying back in season 2, where she sees the Iron Throne. In the scene, we see some type of debris, which fans have interpreted to be either ashes or snow. (Bran also had this same vision in Season 4.) Since Daenerys and Drogon have wiped out the city, the throne room has presumably been destroyed. Reddit user loadingorofile96 pointed something else out: If Dany saw snow in her vision, it could’ve meant that Jon Snow would ultimately win the Iron Throne, except it wouldn’t be the same anymore. We don’t have any confirmation that Jon will take the throne in the finale, but it’s more possible than ever after Daenerys’s actions in the latest episode.

5. The Mother’s Day curse.

There’s no way fans could ever forget the death of Tywin Lannister back in season 4, however many might not remember that the episode, “The Children,” premiered on Father’s Day 2014. Because an episode would be airing on Mother’s Day this year, fans were even speculating on Reddit which mom would die tonight. Although we didn’t see Cersei Lannister’s dead body to know for sure she was killed when the Red Keep fell, we’re pretty certain she couldn’t have survived that. Coincidence? Maybe. But it’s still pretty funny she died on Mother’s Day, a similar case to her father.

6. Cersei may have tried to fight fire with wildfire.

Though Cersei seemed pretty confident that both Euron Greyjoy's fleet and their collection of dragon-killing crossbows would be enough to protect her from the power of Dany and Drogon, she may have had a backup plan ready, too: wildfire. Between the Battle of Blackwater and Cersei's attack on the Great Sept of Baelor, it's clear that the wildfire supply—which was created by Daenerys's father—has yet to be extinguished. And we saw more of its distinct green fire in tonight's episode, as King's Landing began to burn. (Joanna Robinson at Vanity Fair theorizes that the wildfire wasn't strategically put in place by Cersei but was more of the Mad King's stash—and that it could foreshadow Dany's fate.)

7. Arya’s horse wasn't just a horse.

Arya Stark being able to miraculously find a way out of King’s Landing was without a doubt symbolism, but of what? The white horse could be a reference to the story of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse from the Bible, which includes the verse: “I looked, and there before me was a pale horse! Its rider was named Death, and Hades was following close behind him.” While Arya has cheated death many times throughout the series, she’s also brought it upon many. (In the books, pale mare is a plague, but it's also mentioned in a prophecy delivered to Dany by Quaithe: “The glass candles are burning. Soon comes the pale mare, and after her the others. Kraken and dark flame, lion and griffin, the sun's son and the mummer's dragon. Trust none of them. Remember the Undying. Beware the perfumed seneschal.") We’re not sure what this means for the assassin in the finale, but it looks like Arya still has some things to do.

12 Facts About Revenge of the Nerds For Its 35th Anniversary

Twentieth Century Fox
Twentieth Century Fox

In the summer of 1984, nerds were mainly perceived as guys who wore pocket protectors and had tape on their glasses. But in Silicon Valley, Steve Jobs was inventing the type of nerd culture we’re familiar with today. Decades later, nerds rule the world.

Revenge of the Nerds starred then-unknowns Anthony Edwards, Robert Carradine, Curtis Armstrong, James Cromwell, Larry B. Scott, John Goodman, and Timothy Busfield. In the movie, the jock-filled Alpha Beta fraternity bullies the geeks on the campus of Adams College, so to fight back, they form a frat chapter under black fraternity Lambda Lambda Lambda (Tri-Lambs), and take down the jocks. The movie’s plot and title come from a magazine article published around that time about Silicon Valley innovators—who just happened to be nerds.

The film, which was budgeted at $6 million, only opened on 364 screens (it eventually expanded to 877). Somehow the movie had legs and grossed $40,874,452 at the box office and ranked as the 16th highest-grossing film of 1984. It was successful enough to spawn three sequels, none of which were as popular as the original. To celebrate Revenge of the Nerds' 35th anniversary, here are some geeky facts about the underdog comedy.

1. Greek officials at the University of Arizona objected to the movie being filmed on their campus.

The movie filmed at the University of Arizona, and involved the college’s Greek system. The Greek officials didn’t want the movie to be another Animal House, so they threatened to halt production. “We meet with the sororities, and we’re worried we’re about to deal with a bunch of feminists who are pissed because this is a fairly sexist movie,” the film’s director, Jeff Kanew, told the Arizona Daily Star. “I just say to them, ‘Look, I have kids, and I’ll tell you now, I’d let them see this movie. It’s about the triumph of the underdog, not judging a book by its cover. This is a good movie.’” The filmmakers won, and the Greeks allowed them to film there.

2. The set was one big party.

Ted McGinley—who played Alpha Beta honcho Stan Gable—told The A.V. Club: “I was so embarrassed to say Revenge Of The Nerds.” Kanew cast him because he saw him on the cover of a Men of USC calendar, sold at the University of Arizona bookstore. His good looks attracted “hot girls” from the UofA campus to watch the dailies with the cast and crew. “They had beer and pizza and sandwiches,” McGinley said. “I mean, you just don’t do that on movie sets. It was just so much fun, and I thought, ‘It can’t be better than this!’”

3. Curtis Armstrong knew it would be a good movie, even though his character wasn't fully fleshed out.

Curtis Armstrong filmed Risky Business but then was unemployed for a year before he got Revenge of the Nerds. “You have to realize the character of Booger in the original script was non-existent almost,” Armstrong told Entertainment Weekly. “What was there was just, ‘We’ve got b*sh!’ and ‘Mother’s little d**chebag’—those kinds of lines. I was looking at it and thinking, ‘How do I take this and even begin to make it likeable or accessible?’”

With its strong cast, writers, and director, Armstrong said, “It has to be a good movie. But I wasn’t sure how it was going to be taken as opposed to Risky Business, which was sort of an art-house-type movie. This was very much broader and very much cruder, but it had a message that went beyond sex jokes.”

4. The scenes between Booger and Takashi were improvised.

The actors would bring ideas to the director and vice versa, creating a lot of improvisation in the movie. In one scene, Booger and Takashi (Brian Tochi) engage in a friendly game of cards. But unbeknownst to Takashi, Booger tricks him. “We ran and got our cots, and Brian and I were next to each other,” Armstrong told Entertainment Weekly. “It wasn’t planned that we would be next to each other. It just happened that way.”

The production asked the guys to “come up with something” for them to film. “We had nothing at all!” Armstrong said. “We went to the prop people, and they had a deck of cards. And that’s where that scene [and Booger’s whole bit about taking money from Takashi] came from. And they liked it so much that, every time Takashi and I were in the room together, we would have to come up with something else.”

5. Lambda Lambda Lambda exists in real life.

On January 15, 2006, the University of Connecticut founded the co-ed social fraternity. It’s “unaffiliated with Greek Life” and is “dedicated to the enjoyment and enrichment of pop culture and to the brotherhood of its members. Tri-Lambs does not discriminate based on race, gender, religion, class, ability, gender identity, or sexual orientation.”

6. Booger's belch came from a camel.

In one of the film's more memorable scenes, Booger and Ogre compete in a belching contest. Booger takes a swig of beer and lets out a robust seven-second belch and wins the contest. But the effects were added in post-production. “I can’t even belch on command,” Armstrong told USA Today. “If you said to me, ‘Can you belch now?' I couldn’t do it.”

To make up for Armstrong’s dearth of gas, “They wound up finding a recording of a camel having an orgasm,” Armstrong said. “They took this sound and blended it in with a human belch.”

7. Curtis Armstrong wrote a bio for Booger, but it turned out to be about himself.

Because his character wasn’t fully developed, Armstrong wrote a one-page bio for Booger. Years later he re-read the bio and realized he and Booger had similarities. “I’d basically retold my life as Booger without even being aware of it,” Armstrong told Entertainment Weekly. “[One detail] was that [Booger] used nose-picking and belching as a defense mechanism because [he’s] insecure. Now, mind you, I did not pick my nose and belch because I was insecure. However, I was insecure growing up. I didn’t have dates or anything like that; I was not good around girls. But I had other ways of defending myself other than being crude and picking my nose. When I look at it now with some distance, I realize all I was doing was writing about myself.”

8. A Dallas test screening almost killed Revenge of the Nerds.

The film tested well in Las Vegas—an 85—but when the Fox executives took the movie to Dallas, the number dipped. “You’re gonna send us to Dallas to screen a movie that celebrates nerds and in which the black guys intimidate the white football players?!” director Kanew told the Arizona Daily Star. The movie scored in the 60s, which caused Fox to cut marketing for the film and only release it on 364 screens. “I don’t really understand what happened, but it hung around and grew and grew and grew,” Kanew said.

9. Poindexter was originally named after a prop guy.

When Timothy Busfield auditioned for the movie, his character didn’t have many lines, so he had to read Lamar’s lines. At the time, the character was named Lipschultz, after the prop guy. All that was written for the character description was “a violin-playing Henry Kissinger.”

“There was one line Lipschultz had in the original, but our prop guy was named Lipschultz, and he didn’t like the fact that there was a nerd named Lipschultz, so they changed it to Poindexter,” Busfield said during a San Francisco Sketchfest Nerds reunion. Busfield found Poindexter’s costume at a thrift store and showed up to the audition with his hair parted, and danced to “Beat It.”

10. The sequel to Revenge of the Nerds afforded Anythony Edwards a pool.

Anthony Edwards told The A.V. Club that he didn’t want to appear in Revenge of the Nerds II: Nerds in Paradise, but acquiesced because the producers talked him into it. He’s hardly in the film, but the money he earned afforded him a simple luxury. “I ended up with a pool in my backyard that I called the Revenge of the Nerds II pool,” Edwards said. “Not that I’m complaining, but they seriously overpaid me for my weeks of work on the film, so I used it to put in a pool.”

11. A remake (thankfully) got shut down.

After two weeks of filming in the fall of 2006, a Revenge of the Nerds remake stopped production. Emory University in Atlanta pulled out of filming, but according to Variety, the real reason was because a Fox Atomic executive “was not completely satisfied with the dailies.” The cast included Adam Brody and Jenna Dewan.

12. Revenge of the Nerds pushed nerdom into the mainstream.

“I’m not going to say Revenge of the Nerds was responsible for everything in nerd culture, but I do think you could make an argument that that attitude began with the last scene in Revenge,” Armstrong told HuffPost. “The last scene—the scene I probably love above all in that movie—we’re at the pep rally and come out in front of everybody as nerds, and encourage these people of different generations to join them in their nerdness. I get teary thinking about it, and you could certainly make an argument that that was the beginning of embracing nerd culture by everybody.”

This story has been updated for 2019.

The Office Star Ellie Kemper Wants to Do a Reunion Episode

NBC - NBCUniversal Media
NBC - NBCUniversal Media

While rumors of The Office getting a reboot have been swirling around for years, the outlook on that happening any time soon doesn't look good. But a reunion episode might just be possible.

Ellie Kemper, who played Erin Hannon in the beloved series, recently stopped by Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen to dish about the sitcom and her thoughts on whether it might be making a return to the small screen: "I would love there to be a reboot, but I don't think there will be. So, that's a sad answer," Kemper admitted. "But maybe like a reunion episode? That would be fun."

E! News reports that Kemper isn’t the only cast member that wants to get the band back together. Jenna Fischer, who played Pam Beesly, also thinks a reunion episode would be a hit. “I think it's a great idea," Fischer said in 2018. "I would be honored to come back in any way that I'm able to.”

A key player in the series' success, however, is not so enthusiastic about the idea. Steve Carell, who played the infamous Michael Scott, doesn’t think a revival would be well-received. "The climate's different," Carell told Esquire back in 2018. "I mean, the whole idea of that character, Michael Scott, so much of it was predicated on inappropriate behavior. I mean, he's certainly not a model boss. A lot of what is depicted on that show is completely wrong-minded. That's the point, you know? But I just don't know how that would fly now.”

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