Taco Seasoning Sold at Walmart Has Been Recalled Due to Salmonella Contamination

rez-art/iStock via Getty Images
rez-art/iStock via Getty Images

Consumers who shop at Walmart are being warned to check their pantries. As WFMJ reports, two spice mixes sold by the retail chain—Great Value Mild Taco Seasoning Mix and HEB Taco Seasoning Mix Reduced Sodium—have been recalled due to Salmonella concerns.

Salmonellosis is a food-borne illness caused by Salmonella bacteria. It's normally thought of as spreading through eggs, milk, or meat, but pantry items are also vulnerable to salmonella contamination.

In this case, the potential contamination has been traced back to a single lot of cumin produced by Mincing Spice Co. Both taco seasonings mentioned above contain the spice, and Williams Foods LLC has issued a voluntary recall of the products.

The U.S. is in the middle of a deadly Salmonella outbreak. According to the CDC, 768 people across 48 states have fallen ill with the disease, with 122 patients in the hospital and two dead. These outbreaks have been connected to backyard poultry and pig ear dog treats. So far, no reported cases of salmonellosis have been connected to the recalled taco seasoning.

To heed the precautionary recall, look for items with the below dates and numbers in your kitchen at home:

Great Value Mild Taco Seasoning Mix, 1 oz, Item Number: 564829444, UPC: 0 78742 24572 0, Best if used by 07/08/21, Best if used by 07/09/21

HEB Taco Seasoning Mix Reduced Sodium, 1.25 oz, Item Number: 050215, UPC: 0 41220 79609 0, Better by 07/10/21, Better by 07/11/21, Better by 07/15/21

[h/t WFMJ]

Whirlpool Just Recalled More Than 26,000 Glass Cooktops for Turning On By Themselves

Cunaplus_M.Faba/iStock via Getty Images
Cunaplus_M.Faba/iStock via Getty Images

After receiving 133 reports of glass cooktops turning on by themselves, Whirlpool has recalled more than 26,000 of the appliances.

CBS Sacramento reports that the cooktops in question are both radiant and downdraft radiant models with glass cooking surfaces and touch controls, and they were all sold between March 2017 and August 2019, for $1150 to $2500. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the appliances bear the brand names Whirlpool, KitchenAid, or JennAir (the Whirlpool Corporation owns KitchenAid and JennAir) and were sold in home improvement and appliance stores, including Lowe’s, Home Depot, and Best Buy, both in person and online.

In other words, if you have a glass cooktop, it’s probably worth checking the model number and serial number, which should be printed on the underside of the appliance. Enter the numbers into Whirlpool’s online form to determine if yours was recalled. If it was, Whirlpool will install a new one free of charge. In the meantime, the CPSC advises that you turn off the unit at the circuit breaker when you’re not using it, and don’t leave flammable objects or empty cookware on or around the area.

Thankfully, the faulty cooktops haven’t gravely injured anybody, but they have caused a fair amount of damage. There have been 14 reports of heat damage to nearby items, four reports of fire, and one report of property damage, and two people have sustained minor burn injuries.

It’s not the only device that’s recently been recalled due to fire safety risks. Earlier this month, Apple issued a recall of more than 460,000 MacBook Pro batteries. Find out how to check if yours was affected here.

[h/t CBS Sacramento]

Here’s How to Find Out If Your MacBook Pro Was Just Banned by the FAA

shironosov/iStock via Getty Images
shironosov/iStock via Getty Images

Back in June, Apple issued a recall of approximately 460,000 15-inch MacBook Pro laptops sold between September 2015 and February 2017, stating that “the battery may overheat and pose a fire safety risk.” Now, Bloomberg reports that the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has warned airlines to ban those batteries from flights.

Technically, airlines could have started banning the laptops as soon as Apple issued the recall, since 2016 airline safety instructions mandate that all recalled batteries may not fly as cargo or in carry-on baggage. The FAA has essentially alerted them to the recall and reminded them about the existing rules.

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency banned the laptops in early August, which has been implemented so far by TUI Group Airlines, Thomas Cook Airlines, Air Italy, and Air Transat. Domestic airlines in the U.S. are now following suit, so it’s worth finding out if your laptop battery is part of the recall if you have plans to fly soon. Even if you don’t have any current travel plans, it’s a good opportunity to get your recalled battery replaced—which Apple will do for free.

Fast Company outlines exactly how to check your device: Click the Apple icon in the upper left corner of your screen, and tap “About This Mac.” If you see “MacBook Pro (Retina, 15 inch, Mid 2015)” or a similar description, copy the serial number, and paste it into the box under the “Eligibility” section on this page. If your laptop was affected, scroll down and follow the directions to make an appointment for a replacement battery.

Once your battery is replaced, you’re free to fly with your MacBook; just make sure to bring documentation of your battery replacement to the airport, in case officials ask for proof.

[h/t Bloomberg]

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