16 Encouraging Emma Watson Quotes

Anthony Harvey/Getty Images
Anthony Harvey/Getty Images

From the breakthrough role of a lifetime as Hermione Granger, "the brightest witch of her age," in the Harry Potter film franchise to her turn as bookish Belle in the live-action adaptation of Disney's Beauty and the Beast, Emma Watson has built herself a career playing clever women. The real-life Brown University graduate has a sharp mind and strong voice of her own, which she employs in interviews, on social media, and at various United Nations events in her capacity as UN Women Goodwill Ambassador. Though she's no slacker when it comes to winning celebrity style points, she's more than a fashion icon: to plenty of fans, she's a role model with a good head on her shoulders, and the heart to match. To celebrate her birthday (she was born on April 15, 1990), here are some of her most powerful quotes.

1. ON EMBRACING STRENGTH

Emma Watson attends 'The Circle' Paris Photocall at Hotel Le Bristol on June 22, 2017 in Paris, France.
Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

"I feel like young girls are told they have to be a princess, and be delicate and fragile, and that's bulls**t. I identify much more with the idea of being a warrior, being a fighter. If I was going to be a princess, I'd be a warrior princess, definitely. I think women are scared of feeling powerful and strong and brave sometimes. I think you’ve got to embrace it."

— From a July 2011 press conference

2. ON SELF-DETERMINATION

Emma Watson attends the British Fashion Awards at London Coliseum on December 1, 2014 in London, England.
Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

“I don't want other people to decide who I am. I want to decide that for myself.”

— From a 2009 interview with Elle

3. ON DREAMING BIG

Emma Watson attends the Elle Style Awards 2014 at one Embankment on February 18, 2014 in London, England.
Anthony Harvey/Getty Images

"I want to be a Renaissance woman. I want to paint, and I want to write, and I want to act, and I want to just do everything."

From a November 2010 Q&A with Time

4. ON SCREWING UP ONCE IN A WHILE

Emma Watson attends the UK premiere of 'Noah' at Odeon Leicester Square on March 31, 2014 in London, England.
Anthony Harvey/Getty Images

"I don’t want the fear of failure to stop me from doing what I really care about."

From a June 2011 feature in Vogue

5. ON SCREWING UP, PART TWO

Actress Emma Watson attends 'The Bling Ring' premiere during The 66th Annual Cannes Film Festival at the Palais des Festivals on May 16, 2013 in Cannes, France.
Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

"You only learn from experience, so as much as someone can tell you things, you have to go out there and make your own mistakes in order to learn."

From a September 2012 interview with The Telegraph

6. ON PATIENTLY WORKING TOWARD CHANGE

A tweet by Emma Watson reads: '@TaylaGregson @HeforShe Don't expect change to happen overnight, even if its not always visible it's making more impact than you think'
@EmmaWatson, Twitter

"Don't expect change to happen overnight, even if its not always visible it's making more impact than you think"

From a January 2015 livechat on Twitter

7. ON WHAT TO DO WITH A B.A. IN ENGLISH

Emma Watson attends the Oscars at Hollywood & Highland Center on March 2, 2014 in Hollywood, California.
Christopher Polk/Getty Images

"I’ve been very fulfilled by my studies. English has helped me think in an analytical way. It’s helped me see the world from new perspectives. Diving into these stories and characters has given richness to my own life. And now, when I read scripts or look at stories, I have these references for a larger understanding of humanity. I’m sure it will make my job as an actress more interesting."

From a February 2014 interview with Wonderland magazine

8. ON PHOTOSHOP AND IMPERFECTIONS

Emma Watson attends the premiere of Paramount Pictures' 'NOAH' at Zoo Palast on March 13, 2014 in Berlin, Germany.
Andreas Rentz/Getty Images for Paramount Pictures

"With airbrushing and digital manipulation, fashion can project an unobtainable image that’s dangerously unhealthy. I’m excited about the aging process. I’m more interested in women who aren’t perfect. They’re more compelling."

From a March 2014 interview with The Sunday Times

9. ON PLAYING BY HER OWN RULES

Actress Emma Watson attends the premiere of Columbia Pictures' 'This Is The End' at the Regency Village Theatre on June 3, 2013 in Westwood, California.
Jason Kempin/Getty Images

“All I can do is follow my instincts, because I'll never please everyone.”

From a February 2012 interview with The Independent

10. ON DEFYING SEXIST STEREOTYPES

A screenshot of an Emma Watson tweet encouraging a fan to 'Become an engineer.'
@EmmaWatson, Twitter

From a January 2015 livechat on Twitter

11. ON RE-READING BOOKS

Actress Emma Watson attends the premiere of A24's 'The Bling Ring' at Directors Guild Of America on June 4, 2013 in Los Angeles, California.
Jason Kempin/Getty Images

"I like books that aren't just lovely but that have memories in themselves. Just like playing a song, picking up a book again that has memories can take you back to another place or another time."

From a November 2010 Q&A with Time

12. ON BELIEVING IN, AND BEING, YOURSELF

Emma Watson attends the Oscars at Hollywood & Highland Center on March 2, 2014 in Hollywood, California.
Christopher Polk/Getty Images

"Becoming yourself is really hard and confusing, and it’s a process. I was completely the eager beaver in school, I was the girl in the front of the class who was the first person to put her hand up, and it’s often not cool to be the person that puts themself out there, and I’ve often gotten teased mercilessly, but I found that ultimately if you truly pour your heart into what you believe in—even if it makes you vulnerable—amazing things can and will happen."

From her 2013 MTV Movie Awards "Trailblazer" acceptance speech

13. ON NATURAL BEAUTY

Actress Emma Watson attends 'The Bling Ring' press conference during the 66th Annual Cannes Film Festival at Palais des Festival on May 16, 2013 in Cannes, France.
Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Image

"I truly, truly believe that beauty is something that comes from within. You can only really look beautiful if you feel beautiful on the inside. It shows through your face, the way you move and the way you hold yourself."

From a September 2011 interview with Hello! magazine

14. ON LOVING AND LEARNING

Actress and model Emma Watson attends the GQ Men Of The Year Awards at The Royal Opera House on September 6, 2011 in London, England.
Chris Jackson/Getty Images

"When I started dating I had this kind of Romeo and Juliet, fateful romantic idea about love which was almost that you were a victim and there was a lot of pain involved and that was how it should be. Shakespeare said the course of true love never did run smooth, and I had this sense that it had to be painful. It was such a revelation [...] to realize that it shouldn’t be that way and that you get to choose who you love and who you decide to give your heart to.

"It sounds like a cliché but I also learnt that you’re not going to fall for the right person until you really love yourself and feel good about how you are. Well, that was revelatory to me.”

From a September 2012 interview with The Telegraph

15. ON COURAGE

Actress Emma Watson attends the Premiere of Columbia Pictures' 'This Is The End' at Regency Village Theatre on June 3, 2013 in Westwood, California.
Jason Kempin/Getty Images

"There's nothing wrong with being afraid. It's not the absence of fear; it's overcoming it. Sometimes you've got to blast through and have faith."

— From a July 2011 press conference

16. ON CELEBRATING LIFE’S LITTLE ACCOMPLISHMENTS

An Emma Watson tweet reads: 'I never feel so accomplished as when I open a tough jar.'
@EmmaWatson, Twitter

"I never feel so accomplished as when I open a tough jar."

From a November 2012 tweet

This story was first published in 2016.

9 Surprising Facts About James McAvoy

Chris Jackson, Getty Images
Chris Jackson, Getty Images

Whether you know James McAvoy from the X-Men movies or have been a fan since his early gigs on British television, there's no denying that 2019 has already been a very good year for the Scottish actor. In addition to his starring role in M. Night Shyamalan's Glass, McAvoy is set to star in June's Dark Phoenix, will be taking on the role of an adult Bill Denbrough in It: Chapter 2 in October, and will appear in the upcoming TV version of His Dark Materials later this year. And to top it all off, he’s turning 40 on April 21.

In celebration of McAvoy's big day—and even bigger year—here are some things you might not know about the Golden Globe-nominated actor.

1. He was raised by his grandparents.

James McAvoy was born in Glasgow, Scotland, to a psychiatric nurse and a builder. However, his parents split when he was seven, and because his mother was in poor health, McAvoy and his sister went to live with their maternal grandparents. While his mother lived with them on and off throughout his childhood, McAvoy hasn’t spoken to his father since he was a kid.

2. He considered becoming a priest.

McAvoy was brought up in the Roman Catholic church, but that wasn’t the reason he considered becoming a priest. Long before he decided to go the drama school route, he considered entering the priesthood because he thought it would give him an excuse to travel the world.

"I wanted to be a missionary, but it was only because I wanted a free ticket to go and explore the world," McAvoy told The Telegraph in 2006. "I realized I was using God and religion to get my kicks so I knocked that on the head."

3. He married his on-screen love interest.

Anne-Marie Duff and James McAvoy attends the Suffragette Premiere during the Opening Night Gala during the BFI London Film Festival at Leicester Square on October 7, 2015 in London, England
John Phillips, Getty Images for BFI

While working on the UK version of Shameless in the early 2000s, McAvoy met his on-screen love interest and future wife, Anne-Marie Duff. The pair started a relationship that they kept very private, and married in 2006. They went on to also star in 2009’s The Last Station together, but McAvoy later announced he would no longer be working with his then-wife.

"You have to weigh it up against how much of a headache it would be. It exposes you to a lot of questions," he told USA Today in 2011. "I'm very big in saying that I don't agree that if you put yourself in the spotlight, you have to accept it. I do think that if you work together as husband and wife, you're kind of asking for it." Ultimately, the couple split in 2016.

4. Acting was never his plan.

In addition to the priesthood, McAvoy considered a few others careers before he settled on acting. In fact, acting kind of happened by accident. While speaking to The Guardian in 2006, McAvoy explained that it wasn’t until director David Hayman came to his school to speak about the entertainment business that he knew he wanted to give it a go. He was so sure, in fact, that he reportedly approached Hayman after the talk and asked him for some work. (McAvoy's first credited role was in 1995's The Near Room, which Hayman directed.)

“I always believed that I never wanted to be an actor; I only did it because I was allowed to do it and I had to do something,” McAvoy explained. “I felt as if my career just happened to me. I hadn't actually engaged in it. I suppose I felt totally disempowered, just by this fate thing.”

5. Band of Brothers was his big break.

McAvoy’s big break came in HBO’s 2001 miniseries Band of Brothers, produced by Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks. The actor played character James W. Miller in just one episode, but that’s all it took for his phone to start ringing; shortly thereafter, McAvoy scored notable roles on BBC’s Shameless (2004), The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005), and The Last King of Scotland (2006). He wasn't the only up-and-comer who made a name for himself with Band of Brothers: Michael Fassbender, Tom Hardy, and Dominic Cooper were among his co-stars.

6. He’s a Golden Globe nominee.

In 2007, McAvoy played Keira Knightley's love interest in Joe Wright’s period drama Atonement, based on the Ian McEwan novel. The role was one of the actor’s most moving performances to date, and scored him a Golden Globe nomination. Although he has wowed audiences in numerous parts since, such as the man with 23 different personalities in 2016’s Split (and 2019’s Glass), his role in Atonement has earned him the most critical acclaim. McAvoy, too, is a fan.

"[T]o find a film that was so epic, sweeping and romantic, yet be intelligent, was nice to me," McAvoy said. "Also the fact that it’s a very classic story, but it’s told in a very contemporary and modern way."

7. He was slightly tipsy the first time he met M. Night Shyamalan.

M. Night Shyamalan and James McAvoy attend the “Glass” Paris Gala Screening at la Cinematheque Francaise on January 07, 2019 in Paris, France
Kristy Sparow, Getty Images for Disney Studios

Speaking of Split and Glass: McAvoy was definitely in the right place at the right time—and in the right frame of mind—when he first met director M. Night Shyamalan. In a 2017 interview with The Guardian, McAvoy shared how he and Shyamalan just happened to cross paths at San Diego Comic-Con in 2015. "There was a big party, you couldn’t turn around without bumping into somebody off the telly," he said. "My mate Jesse was playing miniature golf in the middle of it. We were getting particularly drunk, and then I saw M. Night Shyamalan. He goes: ‘You’re James McAvoy!’ And I said: ‘You’re M Night Shyamalan! What do I call you?’ I was very drunk.”

Inebriated or not, Shyamalan saw something he liked. One month later, he was on the set of Split (in a role that Joaquin Phoenix was originally set to play, but dropped out of at the last minute).

8. He admires Samuel L. Jackson's no-nonsense attitude.

While promoting Glass, McAvoy participated in a lot of press events with Samuel L. Jackson, and was impressed by what he saw. "I saw examples of what I might be able to do when I got the balls he’s got,” McAvoy said. "That guy does not suffer fools, which is a positive quality. If he gets any kind of question that is in any way not thought out properly, he just drops the F-bomb and is like, ‘What are you talking about? What? What?’ He calls out [the journalist] so hard, and it’s the funniest thing."

9. He credits his success to a lot of luck.

When asked about the secret to his success, McAvoy doesn't mince words: "I got lucky," he told The Talks. "I got so f***ing lucky that I fell into the lap of a director when I was 16 and he gave me a part in a film and my horizons immediately exploded wide with all the weird people in it and all these crazy f***ing actors and directors and artistic people who were from all over the world. Through that one job I met people from England, I met people from America, and I met people from all over the place with challenging points of view and sympathetic points of view to mine. And then I went to a youth theater for six months as well, and that expanded my mind massively. It gave me so much more confidence to find out who I was and not be afraid of who I was simply because I’m in a scenario that I don’t understand ... I got really lucky. I got really, really lucky. It’s been a good ride for me."

Game of Thrones Star Sophie Turner Opened Up About Her Struggles With Depression

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

Playing one of the main characters on the most popular show currently on television isn't always as glamorous as it seems. Sometimes, the pressures of fame can be too much. Sophie Turner realized this while playing Sansa Stark on Game of Thrones, and has recently revealed how being in the public eye took a toll on her mental health.

Turner took on the role of Sansa Stark in 2011, when she was just a teenager, and she quickly became a household name. Now, at 23, she's come forward to Dr. Phil on his podcast Phil in the Blanks to explain how negative comments on social media affected her self-image and mental health.

"I would just believe it. I would say, ‘Yeah, I am spotty. I am fat. I am a bad actress.' I would just believe it," Turned explained. "I would get [the costume department] to tighten my corset a lot. I just got very, very self-conscious."

Later on, these feelings led to major depression. Turner developed a sense of isolation after she realized that all of her friends and family were going off to colleege while she was pursuing a sometimes-lonely acting career.

"I had no motivation to do anything or go out. Even with my best friends, I wouldn't want to see them, I wouldn't want to go out and eat with them," Turner explained. "I just would cry and cry and cry over just getting changed and putting on clothes and be like, 'I can't do this. I can't go outside. I have nothing that I want to do.'"

The feelings of depression stayed with Turner for most of the time she was filming Game of Thrones, and it's a battle she's still fighting. "I've suffered with my depression for five or six years now. The biggest challenge for me is getting out of bed and getting out of the house. Learning to love yourself is the biggest challenge," she continued.

The actress shared that she goes to a therapist and takes medication for her depression—two things that have helped her feel better.

Between Game of Thrones ending and planning her wedding to fiancé Joe Jonas, Turner may not have the time to take on many new acting roles in the near future. However, we'll continue to see her as Sansa Stark in the final season of Game of Thrones, and as Jean Grey in Dark Phoenix, which hits theaters on June 7.

[h/t: E! News]

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